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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


500-Level - Spring 2018

ANTH 550.001 / Archaeological Laboratory Methods

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Course Readings:

There is no text book for this course, but students will be expected to buy a set of inexpensive digital calipers.  Details in first class.

Course Description:

This is a course in basic laboratory procedures for the analysis of archaeological materials.  Topics include archaeological taxonomy and the analysis of ceramics, lithics and animal remains from archeological sites.


  

ANTH 552.001 / Medical Anthropology

Professor: David Simmons

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Cross-listed with HPEB 552.001 and HPEB.H10 

Course Readings:

Donald Joralemon (2006) Exploring Medical Anthropology (2nd Ed.). Pearson Allyn and Bacon.  

Anne Fadiman (1997) The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down. FSG. ISBN 9780374533403 

Paul Farmer (2006) AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame. UC Press. ISBN 0520248392 

Course Description:

This course introduces the field of medical anthropology, which is the study of human health, disease and healing from a cross-cultural perspective. The political economy of health as a result of modernization is a central focus. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of illness and healing, the social/cultural context of health and health interventions, and the impacts of emerging and re-emerging diseases such as AIDS, Ebola, and Tuberculosis on world health. The underlying theme of the course is the use of anthropological concepts and methods in domestic and international public health contexts.


 

ANTH 561.001 / Human Osteology

Professor: Carlina De La Cova

 (4 credits) 

Fulfills the Biological Requirement for the Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Course Readings:

Human Osteology, 3rd Edition. Time White, et al. Hardcover, ISBN 13: 978-0123741349 

Additional readings will be placed on Blackboard. It is the student’s responsibility to check Blackboard daily as announcements, readings, and other materials will be posted on Blackboard.

Course Description:

This course provides an intensive, hands-on and active learning introduction to the identification of human skeletal remains. Throughout the course of the semester students will learn: 1) how to identify skeletal elements, both whole and fragmentary; 2) how to estimate age, sex, ancestry, and stature of an individual; 3) how to distinguish between human and non-human remains; 4) how to reconstruct populations, particularly in terms of diet and disease; and 5) real world applications of human osteology.