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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


700-Level - Spring 2018

ANTH 722.001 / Field School in Archaeology

Professor: Andrew White

(3 Credits) 

Meets with Anth 322 

Course Readings:

No textbook required 

Course Description:

This one-day-a-week archaeological field school will give you hands-on experience in basic excavation methods and techniques, including:

  • grid systems and mapping;
  • controlled hand excavation;
  • documentation of cultural features;
  • description of sediments;
  • record keeping and photography;
  • strategy, logistics, and teamwork.

We will be working at a site along the Broad River that was used by prehistoric peoples over the course of at least 5000 years.  Previous work at the site revealed the presence of a series of prehistoric occupations buried within a natural sand levee. Our work at the site this semester will be focused on: (1) using careful hand excavation to collect detailed information about identified Late Archaic age (ca. 3500-1000 BC) deposits at the site; and (2) investigating deeply buried deposits that may date to the Early Archaic period (ca. 9000-7000 BC).

We will depart from campus each Friday at 8:00 and return by 4:00 (transportation provided). Students will bring their own lunch. There are no formal bathroom facilities on site. Each student will be required to have a small set of personal field gear (e.g., small toolbox, gloves, mason’s trowel, 5m metric tape measure, notebook, etc.). Other tools and field equipment will be provided.


  

ANTH 730.001 / Cultural Theory through Ethnography

Professor: Kimberly Simmons

(3 credits) 

Course Readings:  

Translated Woman by Behar; ISBN: 9780520233683 

Near Northwest Side Storyby Perez; ISBN: 9780520233683 

Tobacco Town Futures by Kingsolver; ISBN: 9781577667087 

Reconstructing Racial Identity and the African Past in the Dominican Republic by Simmons; ISBN: 9780813036755 

After Love: Queer Intimacy and Erotic Economies in Post-Soviet Cuba by Stout; ISBN: 9780822356851 

Recommended:

Harlemworld by Jackson; ISBN: 9780812221312 

First Strike: Educational Enclosures I by Damie; ISBN: 9780816697557 

Feminist Ethnography: Thinking Through by Davis; ISBN: 9780759122451 

Decolonizing Anthropology by Harrison; ISBN: 9780913167830

Course Description:

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the emergence of linguistic anthropology as one of the four core sub-fields within Anthropology, its relationship(s) to sociolinguistics, (critical) discourse analysis, and conversation analysis.  Emphasis will be placed on the scholarly contributions that this tradition has made to social theory as well as theories of language and discourse. 

Course Presentation:

Seminar format driven by student led presentations of prescribed readings on a particular topic. 

Audience: Graduate students in linguistics, anthropology, education, and other related fields interested in the social scientific examination of language in context.


 

ANTH 748.001 / Intro to Linguistic Anthropology

Professor: Jennifer Reynolds

(3 credits) 

Course Readings:

Voices of Modernity by Bauman; ISBN: 9780521008976 

Light of Knowledge by Cody; ISBN: 978080147182 

Intimate Grammars by Webster; ISBN: 9780816531530

He-Said-She-Said by Goodwin; ISBN: 9780253206183 

Language of Law School by Mertz; ISBN: 9780195183108 

Linguistic Anthropology by Duranti; ISBN: 9780521449939 

Course description:

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the emergence of linguistic anthropology as one of the four core sub-fields within Anthropology, its relationship(s) to sociolinguistics, (critical) discourse analysis, and conversation analysis.  Emphasis will be placed on the scholarly contributions that this tradition has made to social theory as well as theories of language and discourse. 

Course Presentation:

Seminar format driven by student led presentations of prescribed readings on a particular topic. 

Audience:

Graduate students in linguistics, anthropology, education, and other related fields interested in the social scientific examination of language in context.