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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


CULTURAL - Spring 2018

 

ANTH 231.001 / African American Cultures

Professor: Terry Weik

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Race in the 21st Century: Ethnographic Approaches, John Hartigan 

Uncommon Ground: Archaeology and Early African America, 1650-1800, by Leland Ferguson. 

See Blackboard for additional readings, handouts, a copy of the syllabus, extra credit, etc. 

Course Description:

This course will survey some of the major perspectives on African American experiences during the last few centuries. The main themes that will be explored include cultural practices, oral traditions, social interactions, African heritage, slavery, inequality, resistance, material culture, religion, and migration.  Although North America will be our geographical focus, we will also briefly explore connections with people of African descent who live in other parts of the world.  We will explore African American cultures through anthropology, and also consider alternative approaches such as Black studies, Afrocentricity, nationalism, and African Diaspora.  Within these discourses circulate theories and concepts such as culture, identity, race, and class that also shape our view of different populations.  Lectures, exercises, films, music, and discussions comprise class content. 

Learning Outcomes:

Students will be able to do the following by the end of the semester:

1) identify critical thinking skills that can be applied to African American studies and mass media

2) explain social and cultural factors that affect different populations and experiences  

3) articulate ways that race(ism) has shaped people’s lives 

4) assess African Americans’ contributions to and impacts on South Carolina and the world.

5) conduct cultural analyses of academic, popular, and community representations of Blackness 

Method of Evaluation:

Films, readings, hands-on activities, & lectures contain vital information that students will apply on assignments and exams.


ANTH 291.001 / Selected Topic: Race and Racialization

Professor: Sherina Feliciano-Santos

(3 credits)  

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Articles posted on Blackboard 

Course Description:

What is race? What does it mean to talk about race as a “social construct”?  This course will consider these and other questions by tracing the trajectories of the concept(s) of race, including the changing and sometimes contradictory ways that race has been defined along with the political, economic, social, and cultural corollaries of race.  This course will draw on all four fields of anthropology (biological, linguistic, cultural, and archaeological anthropology) to consider the multiple processes involved in racialization and racism, in tandem with their impact on human experiences across cultural settings in the United States and other countries. Topics will consider race from the perspective of the body, material culture, language, identity, social movements, immigration, sports, globalization, the legal and justice system, gender and sexuality, environmental racism, “racism without racists,” and anti-racism.   We will study different academic approaches to the study of race and racialization, which students will apply to a short research project.  Students from all disciplinary perspectives are welcome.


                            ANTH 291.H01 / Selected Topic: Gender Issues in China

Professor: Marc Moskowitz

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Kuan, Teresa. 2015. Love’s Uncertainty: The Politics and Ethics of Child Rearing in Contemporary China. University of California Press. 

Moskowitz, Marc L. 2010. Cries of Joy, Songs of Sorrow. Chinese Popular Music. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 

Zheng, Tiantian. 2015. Tonzhi Living: Men Attracted to Men in Postsocialist China. University of Minnesota Press.

Articles on Blackboard. 

Course Description:

In this course we will cover a wide range of gender issues in Chinese culture in traditional China, the PRC, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The course will begin by briefly addressing the roles of women and men in traditional China and then trace changes in women's and men's roles in the early years of the People's Republic of China. We will then explore contemporary Chinese speaking cultures in contrast to traditional belief systems.  


ANTH 356.Y01/ Anthropology of Art

Professor: Jonathan Leader

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Calliope’s Sisters: A Comparative Study of Philosophies of Art by Anderson; ISBN: 9780130936097 

Art in Small-Scale Societies: Contemporary Readings by Anderson; ISBN: 9780130454515 

Aboriginal Art by Morphy; ISBN: 9780714837529

Course Description:

This course will introduce the student to the anthropological study of art. Classic concepts and articles will be discussed in class for their enduring insights, temporal connections, and areas of blindness. Contemporary studies from within and without western societies will be used to illustrate the breadth and current concerns within the sub-discipline. By the end of class the student will have acquired a basic understanding of this field of endeavor and have mastered the terminology.


ANTH 360.001 / Anthropology of Sex

Professor: Marc Moskowitz

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major and GLD (Global Learning) 

Course Readings:

Bonhomme, Julien. [2009] 2016. The Sex Thieves: The Anthropology of a Rumor. Chicago: Hau Books. ISBN: 9780986132582 

Gray, Mary L. 2009. Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America. New York: NYU Press. ISBN: 9780814731932 

Kulick, Don. 1998. Travesti: Sex, Gender, and Culture among Brazilian Transgendered Prostitutes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN: 9780226461007 

Moskowitz, Marc L. 2001. The Haunting Fetus: Abortion, Sexuality, and the Spirit World in Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.  ISBN: 9780520276321 

Course Description:

This course is a cross-cultural examination of sexual ideologies and practices. In it, we will address a wide range of cultural manifestations of sexuality and variations within particular cultures around the world. The course will primarily be focused on contemporary culture but we will also address historical shifts in conceptualizing sexuality as a moral and medicalized discourse. There will be a special emphasis on cultural, economic, political, and religious influences on sexual thought and practice though we will also touch on psychological and other theoretical models of sexuality. 


ANTH 391.H01 / Global Women’s Health

Professor: Kathryn Luchok

(3 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Meets With WGST 430

Course Readings:

Anne Firth Murray. 2013, 2nd edition. From Outrage to Courage: The Unjust and Unhealthy Situation of Women in Poorer Countries and What They are Doing About it. Menlo Park, CA: Anne Firth Murray. 

Ida Susser. 2009. AIDS, Sex, and Culture: Global Politics and Survival in Southern Africa.: Wiley-Blackwell Press. 

Nicolas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn. 2010. Half the Sky, Vintage Books. 

Course Description:

This course examines health issues important in the lives of women around the world. The course will take a life cycle approach beginning with issues surrounding the birth of girl babies, continuing through the period of growth and development, adulthood, including family planning, pregnancy and lactation and ending with old age. Drawing on medical and applied anthropology perspectives, the course will cover the sociocultural landscape of women’s lives, including the forces that promote and hinder the health and well-being of women around the globe. Also examined will be programs aimed at improving women’s lives world-wide. The goal of this course is to provide students with a clearer understanding of the female life cycle and a greater appreciation for the mental, physical and social health risks women face on a global scale. 

This class will be of interest to any undergraduate interested in global issues, culture and health and/or women’s health, including but not limited to those in Anthropology, Global Studies, WGST, Public Health, Nursing, Social Work, Education, Sociology, and Psychology.



ANTH 552.001 / Medical Anthropology

Professor: David Simmons

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Cross-listed with HPEB 552.001 and HPEB.H10 

Course Readings:

Donald Joralemon (2006) Exploring Medical Anthropology (2nd Ed.). Pearson Allyn and Bacon.  

Anne Fadiman (1997) The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down. FSG. ISBN 9780374533403 

Paul Farmer (2006) AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame. UC Press. ISBN 0520248392 

Course Description:

This course introduces the field of medical anthropology, which is the study of human health, disease and healing from a cross-cultural perspective. The political economy of health as a result of modernization is a central focus. Topics covered include cross-cultural understandings of illness and healing, the social/cultural context of health and health interventions, and the impacts of emerging and re-emerging diseases such as AIDS, Ebola, and Tuberculosis on world health. The underlying theme of the course is the use of anthropological concepts and methods in domestic and international public health contexts.