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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


GRADUATION WITH LEADERSHIP DISTINCTION - Spring 2018

ANTH 102.001-012 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Courtney Lewis

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement and GLD (Global Learning) 

Course Readings:

Cultural Anthropology Bundle by Miller; ISBN: 9780134667249

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: 

Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity. 



ANTH 102.013 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Anais Parada

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement and GLD (Global Learning) 

Course Readings:

Miller, Barbara. 2015. Cultural Anthropology in a Globalizing World. 4th Edition. Pearson. 

Kingsolver, Ann E. 2011. Tobacco Town Futures: Global Encounters in Rural Kentucky. Long Grove, Il: Waveland Press, Inc. 

Selected readings posted on Blackboard Main Lecture Site. 

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: 

Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity.


 

ANTH 360.001 / Anthropology of Sex

Professor: Marc Moskowitz

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Requirement for the Anthropology Major and GLD (Global Learning) 

Course Readings:

Bonhomme, Julien. [2009] 2016. The Sex Thieves: The Anthropology of a Rumor. Chicago: Hau Books. 

Gray, Mary L. Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America. New York: NYU Press. 

Course Description:

This course is a cross-cultural examination of sexual ideologies and practices. In it, we will address a wide range of cultural manifestations of sexuality and variations within particular cultures around the world. The course will primarily be focused on contemporary culture but we will also address historical shifts in conceptualizing sexuality as a moral and medicalized discourse. There will be a special emphasis on cultural, economic, political, and religious influences on sexual thought and practice though we will also touch on psychological and other theoretical models of sexuality. 


Anthropology 371.001 / Ethnography of Communication

Professor: Sherina Feliciano-Santos

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Linguistic Requirement for the Anthropology Major and GLD: PCE Leadership 

Course Readings:

Ethnography of Communication by Saville-Troike; ISBN: 978631228424 

Homegirls by Mendoza-Denton; ISBN: 978631234906 

Cultural Approach to Interperson Communitcation by Monaghan; ISBN: 9781444335316

Course Description:

This course will introduce students to the empirical study of language and communication in context.  Using a cross-cultural approach, students will explore how norms and expectations for what are considered appropriate ways of talking and interacting (including things like gaze, spatial organization, hand gestures, and bodily positioning for example) differ across social events and cultural locales.  In fact, we will consider how such norms and expectations might help us constitute “identities” and “communities.”  Additionally, students will familiarize themselves with ethnographic and analytical methods in the study of communication, which they will apply to a short research project.