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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


ARCHAEOLOGY - Spring 2018

ANTH 224.Y01 / Indigenous Caribbean Archaeology

ONLINE

Professor: Antonio de la Cova

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Indigenous Caribbean Arcaeology. Wilson, Samuel M. The Archaeology of the Caribbean (Cambridge University Press, 2007) 

Rouse, Irving. The Tainos: Rise and Decline of the People Who Greeted Columbus (Yale

University Press, 1992) Hayward, Michele H. ed., et al. Rock Art of the Caribbean (University of Alabama Press, 2009). 

Course Description:

Indigenous Caribbean Archaeology: Historical archaeology and ethnography of the Saladoid, Taino, Carib and other indigenous cultures of the Caribbean from 4,000 BC to 1524 AD. Emphasis on social complexity, religion, art, and political organization to illustrate the diversity and richness of Amerindian Caribbean life until their rapid decline after European contact.


ANTH 229.001 / Southeastern Archaeology

Professor: Gail Wagner

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

Recent Developments in Southeastern Archaeology, From Colonization to Complexity, by David G. Anderson and Kenneth E. Sassaman. 2012. The SAA Press, Washington, D.C. ISBN 978-0-932839-43-5 

Course Description:

This course begins with a brief introductory background on archaeology, as well as an overview of the cultures and the environmental setting of the Southeast. During the semester we progress from the first humans in the Southeast through time up into the early Colonial period when Europeans began to explore and settle the Southeast. One focus of the course is on characterizing each of the cultural-temporal periods. Additionally, we investigate seven major issues: initial colonization, mounding, pottery, domestication, the Hopewell Interaction Sphere, the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex, and foodways. 

Course Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of ANTH 229, students will be able to:

1.   List the names and date ranges of the major cultural-temporal periods in the Southeast;

2.   Differentiate between the cultural periods by describing the climatic and cultural settings;

3.   Identify (who, what, where, when) major archaeological sites of the Southeast;

4.   List and discuss major issues in southeastern archaeology. 

Evaluation:

Course grades will be based on quizzes, assignments, and tests. Attendance is required. 

Course Presentation: 

This is a lecture course. Blackboard is heavily used. 

Audience: 

For students who are interested in archaeology or the Southeast, this is a basic introductory course taught about a region and by discussing important issues. No prior knowledge of anthropology or archaeology is needed.


 

ANTH 319.001 / Principles of Archaeology

Professor: Terry Weik

 (3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

(Integrative Course) 

Course Readings: 

Archaeology (2013, 6th edition), by Robert L. Kelly & David Hurst Thomas.  Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. 

Course Description:

This class introduces students to the history, research methods, and theoretical traditions of Archaeology.  The nature of archaeological data and evidence is explored in different contexts and case studies.  The course has a global scope that explores a variety of approaches and perspectives. 

Course Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the semester students will be able to:

1.  Differentiate archaeology from other approaches to the past.

2.  Articulate some fundamental research methods used by archaeologists.

3.  Understand how human life was different in the ancient past.

4.  Explain core ideas and concepts that shape anthropological theory.

5.  Identify important places that constitute our world historical heritage.

6.  Understand how professionals curate artifacts.

7.  Engage in hands on exercises involving digital and qualitative methods for analyzing landscapes and artifact chronologies. 

Couse Method of Evaluation:

Students will be evaluated based on their performance on exams, class discussions, and exercises. 

Course Presentation:

This course involves classroom discussions, introductory lectures, films, computer applications, and artifact exercises. 

Course Audience:

Students who take this course tend to come from a variety of majors and backgrounds. 


ANTH 322.001 / Field School in Archaeology

Professor: Andrew White

(3 credits) 

Meets with Anth 722 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major or DURT 

Course Readings:

No textbook required 

Course Description:

This one-day-a-week archaeological field school will give you hands-on experience in basic excavation methods and techniques, including:

  • grid systems and mapping;
  • controlled hand excavation;
  • documentation of cultural features;
  • description of sediments;
  • record keeping and photography;
  • strategy, logistics, and teamwork.

We will be working at a site along the Broad River that was used by prehistoric peoples over the course of at least 5000 years.  Previous work at the site revealed the presence of a series of prehistoric occupations buried within a natural sand levee. Our work at the site this semester will be focused on: (1) using careful hand excavation to collect detailed information about identified Late Archaic age (ca. 3500-1000 BC) deposits at the site; and (2) investigating deeply buried deposits that may date to the Early Archaic period (ca. 9000-7000 BC).

We will depart from campus each Friday at 8:00 and return by 4:00 (transportation provided). Students will bring their own lunch. There are no formal bathroom facilities on site. Each student will be required to have a small set of personal field gear (e.g., small toolbox, gloves, mason’s trowel, 5m metric tape measure, notebook, etc.). Other tools and field equipment will be provided.


ANTH 327.Y01 / Prehistoric Civilizations of the New World

Online

Professor: Antonio De La Cova

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

 Course Readings:

Prehistoric Civilizations of the New World. Richard Townsend, The Aztecs (3rd ed., 2009) ISBN 0-500-2879-10 

Michael D. Coe and Stephen Houston, The Maya (9th ed., 2015) ISBN 978-0-500-29188-7 

Rebecca R. Stone, The Art of the Andes (3rd ed., 2012) ISBN 0-500-2041-5 

Course Description:

Prehistoric Civilizations of the New World: Study of South American and  Mesoamerican civilizations, including the Caral, Chavin, Nazca, Moche, Tiwanacu, Wari, Inca, Maya and Aztec nations. Processes of state formation as reflected in archaeological data. Emphasis is on the social life, gender roles, cultural achievements, religion, human sacrifice, mummification, and political systems to illustrate the diversity and richness of Amerindian life before the Spanish conquest.


ANTH 328.Y01 / Ancient Civilizations

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major 

Course Readings:

TBA 

Course Description:

Ancient Civilizations. One of the things that history teaches us is that great civilizations rise and fall. Even our own will someday fall. In this class we will explore the history of some of the world’s great civilizations, like those that developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Central America. All ancient civilizations had some form of record keeping, but their beginnings often happened before their history was recorded. For this reason, we will explore these ancient civilizations through the lens of archaeology—the material remains of past behaviors. During this course you will learn what is meant by the term civilization and how to use archaeology to study civilizations. You will leave the course with an in-depth understanding of some of the world’s greatest civilizations.


ANTH 546.001 / Forensic Archaeological Recovery (FAR)

Professor: Jonathan Leader

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Course Readings:

TBA 

Course Description:

This course introduces the student to Forensic Archaeological Recovery (FAR).  The application of archaeology’s methods and techniques to the search and recovery of human remains, other items and otherwise buried/hidden data. A core tool in the arsenal for the investigation of criminal cases, cold cases, missing person’s cases, battlefield MIA/KIA, massacres and disasters. This is applied archaeology on the edge. Where accuracy counts and justice and families wait. 

Central concepts, defining articles and multimedia presentations will be presented and discussed in class for their enduring insights, multi-disciplinary connections, and areas of relevance. Contemporary case studies from within and without western societies will be used to illustrate the breadth and current concerns within the sub-discipline. By the end of class the student will have acquired a basic understanding of this field of endeavor and have mastered the terminology.

Learning Outcomes:

 Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

  1. Recognize and apply specific anthropological terminology and concepts as it relates to the sub-field.
  2. Understand the fundamental elements of FAR.
  3. Understand the methods used in and goals of FAR.
  4. Recognize the interdependency of forensic activity and cultural norms and expectations.
  5. Recognize the defining characteristics of FAR and its relationship to the client base, stakeholders, judiciary and other forensic practitioners.

Audience: Previous knowledge in this specific area is not required, but a basic understanding of anthropology or allied area of study (e.g., criminal justice, sociology, political science, psychology, law, history, social geography, military studies or medicine/nursing) is expected.


  

ANTH 550.001 / Archaeological Laboratory Methods

Professor: Joanna Casey

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Archaeological Requirement for the Anthropology Major

OR

Fulfills the 500-level(s) requirement(s) for the Major or for DURT 

Course Readings:

There is no text book for this course, but students will be expected to buy a set of inexpensive digital calipers.  Details in first class.

Course Description:

This is a course in basic laboratory procedures for the analysis of archaeological materials.  Topics include archaeological taxonomy and the analysis of ceramics, lithics and animal remains from archeological sites.