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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


GSS - Spring 2018

Anthropology 101.001 / Primates, People, and Prehistory

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs. of the 6 hr. Social Sciences (GSS) Requirement 

Course Readings:

Human Antiquity: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology by Kenneth L. Feder and Michael Alan Park. Mayfield Publishing Company. 

Course Description:

Physical anthropology, as a subfield of general anthropology, is focused on understanding humans as biological organisms and users of culture. This class will provide an introduction to the concepts, methods, and data of physical, biological, and archaeological anthropology. 

Students will explore human origins, human evolution, human prehistory, and cultural existence from its less complex forms to early civilizations.


ANTH 102.001-012 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Courtney Lewis

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement and GLD (Global Learning)

Course Readings:

TBA 

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: 

Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity. 


ANTH 102.013 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Anais Parada

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement and GLD (Global Learning) 

Course Readings:

Miller, Barbara. 2015. Cultural Anthropology in a Globalizing World. 4th Edition. Pearson. 

Kingsolver, Ann E. 2011. Tobacco Town Futures: Global Encounters in Rural Kentucky. Long Grove, Il: Waveland Press, Inc. 

Selected readings posted on Blackboard Main Lecture Site. 

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: 

Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity.


Anthropology 102.S1A / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Kathryn Luchok

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement 

Only one prerequisite per Major can be used for the GSS Requirement 

Graduation with Leadership Distinction: Global Learning 

CLOSED: Shorelight Students Only


ANTH 213.001 / Ethnobotany: Plants and Peoples

Professor: Gail Wagner

(3 credits) 

Fulfills the Cultural Anthropology Course Requirement and GSS Requirement

Also can be used for DURT Track-Methodology 

Course Readings:

Students read articles posted on Blackboard. 

Course Description:

Every culture depends on plants for needs as diverse as food, shelter, clothing, and medicines. Certain plants hold symbolic meanings for people. Plants affect people in many ways. Ethnobotany—the interrelationships between cultures and plants—is a field of study by disciplines as diverse as anthropology, botany, chemistry, pharmacognosy, and engineering. This course provides a multi-cultural overview of human-plant interactions through the lenses of the four anthropological subfields of cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistics, and archaeology. No background in either anthropology or botany is needed, just a curiosity to learn more about human-plant relationships. The emphasis is on cultural anthropology: students participate in a class research project on an ethnobotanical subject. 

Course Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of Anthropology 213, students will be able to:

1. Answer the question: what is ethnobotany?

2. List the subfields of anthropology and summarize how each intersects with ethnobotany;

3. Outline differences in worldviews and how those affect human-nature relationships;

4. Summarize important ethnobotanical issues;

5. Give examples of ethical responsibilities in human subject research;

6. Be professionally and nationally CITI certified for human subject research;

7. Conduct an oral interview;

8. Apply the scientific method by stating a testable hypothesis, researching the topic, compiling data, and evaluating the findings. 

Course Evaluation:

Online worksheets, online questions about each reading, Assignments, and work on the class project. 

Course Audience:

This course is suitable for anyone from any background, with no prerequisites. If you are interested in learning more about the relationships between people and plants, this is the course for you! No prior knowledge of either anthropology or botany needed, and you come out of the course with marketable skills to put on your resume (CITI certification, human subject research).