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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


Prereq Spring 2018

Anthropology 101.001 / Primates, People, and Prehistory

Professor: Adam King

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs. of the 6 hr. Social Sciences (GSS) Requirement 

Course Readings:

Human Antiquity: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology by Kenneth L. Feder and Michael Alan Park. Mayfield Publishing Company. 

Course Description:

Physical anthropology, as a subfield of general anthropology, is focused on understanding humans as biological organisms and users of culture. This class will provide an introduction to the concepts, methods, and data of physical, biological, and archaeological anthropology. 

Students will explore human origins, human evolution, human prehistory, and cultural existence from its less complex forms to early civilizations.


 

ANTH 102.001 - .012 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Courtney Lewis

(3 credits)

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement

 Only one prerequisite per Major can be used for the GSS Requirement

 Graduation with Leadership Distinction: Global Learning 

Course Readings:

Cultural Anthropology Bundle by Miller; ISBN: 9780134667249

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: 

Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity.


ANTH 102.013 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Anais Parada

(3 credits)

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement

 Only one prerequisite per Major can be used for the GSS Requirement

 Graduation with Leadership Distinction: Global Learning 

Course Readings:

Miller, Barbara. 2015. Cultural Anthropology in a Globalizing World. 4th Edition. Pearson. 

Kingsolver, Ann E. 2011. Tobacco Town Futures: Global Encounters in Rural Kentucky. Long

Grove, Il: Waveland Press, Inc. 

Selected readings posted on Blackboard Main Lecture Site 

Course Description: 

What is the concept of culture?  How have anthropologists studied it?  This course is designed to celebrate creative similarities & differences expressed through cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations.  It will also deal with the effects of class, ethnic, racial, and gender hierarchies across a range of cultural and societal contexts.  The course will introduce the beginning student to the primary domains of cultural anthropology: the concept of culture, fieldwork, and professional ethics. The overarching objectives of this class seek to help students develop an appreciation of how human cultural diversity is always understood against the backdrop of what is shared, to develop an awareness of our own cultural ethnocentrisms, to deepen students’ understanding of different forms of social stratification and inequality in cross-cultural perspective, and to illustrate how anthropology contributes to interdisciplinary approaches which seek to ameliorate contemporary world problems. 

Course Presentation:

Lectures, films, and small & large group discussion. 

Audience: Undergraduate students interested in learning about contemporary human cultural and linguistic diversity.


 

ANTH 102.S1A / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Kathryn Luchok

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement and GLD (Global Learning) 

NOTE: Shorelight Students Only

 

Course Readings:

Kenneth Guest: Cultural Anthropology: A Toolkit for a Global Age, 2nd Edition, NY: W.W. Norton 

Course Description:

We live in an ever changing world and our global connections are constantly growing. We often come in contact with people who have different ways of thinking and acting. Cultural anthropology is the study of humans and how they have organized themselves to live together and to give meaning to their lives. The research strategies of anthropologists can help us better understand and engage in today’s world. What can anthropology teach us about the everyday relationships, realities, and social problems we face within and across other cultures? This course will introduce us to cultural diversity in all of its social and symbolic manifestations. We will learn about different ideas, worldviews, and cultural practices. We will encounter similarities that link us all as human beings as well as differences that make us unique. To understand a culture implies recognition of such similarities and differences, along with a desire to know why such differences exist, and to appreciate these differences on their own terms and in their own historical, social, and cultural contexts. We will examine how people in various cultural contexts create meaning and negotiate power and we will also see the myriad ways we effect each other in this ever expanding global village. While we learn about others, we also get a clearer picture of ourselves. 


 

Anthropology 161.001 - .008 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

                                                                                           Professor: Kenneth Kelly

     (4 credits)

 Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

 (Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No textbook required.

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


ANTH 161.H01 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

Professor: Josh Robinson

(4 credits)

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No textbook required.

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


Anthropology 161.H02 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

      Professor: Josh Robinson

     (4 credits)

 FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY

 Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains;. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


Anthropology 161.H03 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

      Professor: Josh Robinson

     (4 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement)

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains;. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.