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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Anthropology


PREREQUISITE - SPRING 2017

**PREREQUISITES**

(The prerequisite courses do not have to be taken before other Anthropology courses and ANTH 101 / 161** and ANTH 102 may be taken at the same time. Either Anth 101 OR Anth 102 can be used to also satisfy 3 hours of the GSS Requirement. )

NOTE: The Prerequisites do not fulfill the Biological, Cultural or any Elective Requirement in Anthropology!

**ANTH 161 can be used as 4 credits of the 8 credit needed for the Scientific Literacy Requirement at the same time it can be used as our Prerequisite.


 

Anthropology 101.001 / Primates, People, and Prehistory 

Professor: Joanna Casey 

(3 credits)  

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors 

AND 

Fulfills 3 hrs. of the 6 hr. Social Sciences (GSS) Requirement  

Course Readings: 

Understanding Humans by Lewis, Barry, Robert Jurmain and Lynn Kilgore (2013)  

There will also be some required readings the links for which will be posted on Blackboard  

Course Description: 

This is a course on Human Evolution. The course commences with an overview of the processes of evolution, and adaptation and modern human diversity. We then investigate the place of humans within the animal kingdom, and move on to the fossil evidence for human evolution and the archaeological artifacts that inform us about cultural developments and changes.  

Evaluation: 

There will be four multiple choice and short answer tests throughout the semester and several short assignments. Attendance is mandatory  

Audience: 

This course is suitable for everyone.

 


 

Anthropology 101.002 / Primates, People and Prehistory

Professor: Terrance Weik

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs. of the 6 hr. Social Sciences (GSS) Requirement

 

Course Readings:

Articles on Black Board 

Course Description:

This course is a survey of some of the fundamental evidence, methods, and theories that comprise archaeology and biological anthropology. Students will develop an introductory understanding of how archaeology and biological anthropology are related to other subfields of anthropology, as well as the social and natural sciences. This class is designed to explore the relationship between human biology, history, environment, artifacts, and culture, with special emphasis on evolution. 

Course Learning Objectives

By the end of the semester students will be able to

1) Understand how human culture & evolution interrelate;

2)  Describe methods that archaeologists & biological anthropologists use to study evolution;

3) Recognize human & primate anatomy and behavior;

4) Explain how theories connect subfields of anthropology;

5) Map our ancient, global biological & cultural heritage;

6) Articulate how human affairs are interrelated to cultural and natural resources;

7) Apply cultural analysis & critical thinking to theories about human origins and ancient life. 

Grading:    

Assignments include a quiz, an exam, a fieldwork exercise, and a final exam. Participation also affects one’s grade. 

Carolina Core

This course meets a requirement for the Carolina Core.  Sample assignments or exams will be collected (with names removed & identities kept anonymous) so that they can be submitted to Faculty & Staff who review this course for the Carolina Core Program.


 

ANTH 102.001-012 / Understanding Other Cultures

Professor: Kimberly Simmons

(3 credits) 

Prerequisite for Anthropology Majors & Minors

AND

Fulfills 3 hrs of the 6-hr Social Science GSS (Global Citizenship & Multicultural Understanding) Carolina Core Requirement

 

Course Readings: TBA 

Course Description:

An exploration and comparison of selected contemporary cultures, including their languages. An introduction to the concepts, methods, and data of socio-cultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. May be taken with, or independently of, ANTH 101.



Anthropology 161.001 - 008 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

Professor: Kenneth Kelly

     (4 credits) 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains;. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.



Anthropology 161.H01 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

      Professor: William Stevens

     (4 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs 

(Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains;. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.


  

Anthropology 161.H02 / Human Origins: An Intro to Biological Anthropology

      Professor: Kevin Fogle

     (4 credits) 

FOR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY 

Can be used as a Prerequisite in place of ANTH 101 within the Major & Minor

AND

Fulfills 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Scientific Literacy’s 8 hrs 

 (Note: This course can be used as a Prerequisite for the Anthropology Major and it can also be used for 4 hrs of the Carolina Core Requirements for the Science Literacy’s 8 credits at the same time. This course cannot be used to satisfy any credits for the Social Science GSS Carolina Core Requirement) 

Course Readings:

No required texts 

Course Description:

This four-credit course satisfies the College of Arts and Sciences requirement for a Lab Science Course.  It can also meet the Anthropology Major prerequisite requirement and the Anthropology Minor requirement in place of ANTH 101.  It meets for two one hour and fifteen minute lectures and a required two-hour lab.  Students should take either ANTH 101 or ANTH 161, and not take both courses due to some course overlap. The course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Biological anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that emphasizes a focus on humanity and its origin from a biological perspective.  As a subfield of Anthropology, biological anthropology recognizes the complex interaction of biology and culture in the evolutionary development of the human species.  In this class we study the basic concepts and mechanisms of evolution and the evolutionary history of humankind from primate beginnings to anatomically and behaviorally modern Homo sapiens. The course is divided into 3 sections: 1) the science of anthropology and the models and mechanisms of human evolution; 2) modern human variation and adaptation, and our relationships to non-human primates; and 3) the origin, development, and dispersal of humans using evidence from the fossil record (paleoanthropology) and archaeological remains;. Along the way, it illustrates the ways in which anthropologists learn about the past and how we can use our knowledge of the past to understand the present.  The weekly labs will address subjects including genetics, human variation, primate anatomy and behavior, human anatomy, fossil hominids, and archaeological dating techniques.