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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures


Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Courses  | Graduate Courses | Courses taught in English

German Undergraduate Courses

German 109: Beginning German I. (3) This course is designed for students who have not previously studied German or for those who have received a G1 score on the University of South Carolina German Placement Test. Particular emphasis is placed on establishing the basis for subsequent development of functional levels of reading, writing, listening, and speaking ability in modern German through German video, audio, and reading materials. Also taught in the evening.

German 110: Beginning German II. (3) This second semester course in German is only for students who have completed German 109 at USC. It builds on the material introduced in German 109, offering the student the opportunity to continue the development of listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills in modern German. Also taught in the evening.

German 121: Elementary German. (4) This course is open only to students who have previously studied German and have received a G2 score on the University of South Carolina German Placement Test. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills through German video, audio, and reading materials. This course covers the same material as German 109 and 110, however it includes only a brief review of the most basic features of the language.

German 122: Basic Proficiency in German. (3) This course is open only to those students who have successfully completed German 110 or 121 or have received a G3 score on the University of South Carolina German Placement Test. Through the use of authentic video, audio, and reading materials students are offered the opportunity to develop their reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills in modern German. The course also includes some instruction in everyday German culture. Successful completion of the exit examination fulfills the foreign language requirement for the College of Arts and Sciences.

German 210: Intermediate German. (Prereq.: Germ 122 or score of G5 on Phase II placement test.).The goal of German 210 is to strengthen all four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) and review the grammar learned in the 100-level courses while introducing you to contemporary German culture and literature. With your active participation, you will hone your reading strategies in German, enabling you to understand and analyze authentic German texts, write longer essays based on your opinions and readings, improve your spoken and written accuracy, and learn about various aspects of the culture of German-speaking countries.

German 211: Intermediate German. (Prereq.: Germ 122 or score of G5 on Phase II placement test.) This course will continue to practice the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills as well as complete the grammar review begun in German 210. Students will read progressively longer German texts, engage in more involved writing activities, watch German films, and listen to authentic German to learn more about the history and culture of German-speaking countries.

German 230: The Idea of Nature in Germany. The idea of nature in Germany from the 18th century to today. Focus on scientific, technological, philosophical, practical, social and political entanglements that prompt radical shifts in how German thinkers view nature.  

German 270: Knights and Ladies. The course is an introduction to Middle High German courtly literature. The history and culture of the High Middle Ages will provide the background for the readings. The roles of men and women, such as the serving knight, the lord, the lady, and the literary patron will stand at the center of discussions. The major genres/texts analyzed include the courtly romances Erec, Iwein, Parzival, and Tristan, the Nibelungenlied, and the courtly love lyrics of Walther von der Vogelweide, Reinmar von Hagenau, and Heinrich von Morungen. No prerequisite or knowledge of German is required.

German 280: Survey of German Culture & Civilization. Multimedia (Powerpoint, film, music) introduction to the length and breadth of German culture, starting with the arrival in the 5th century of the Germanic tribes into western and southern Europe, and ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall and resultant unification of Germany in 1989/90. The focus will be on culture inthe widest sense, meaning not only attention to the peaks of literature, the visual arts, and music, but also to the development of major trends in thoughtas formulated by significant philosophers and reflected in the political and social transformation of Germany. Fulfils the Carolina Core Non-US History (GHS) requirement!

German 290: Viking Mythology. The course is an introduction to the mythology and heroic poetry of Viking Age Scandinavia. The history and culture of the Germanic tribes will provide background for the readings. Attention will be paid to Icelandic society at the time the myths and much of the heroic poetry were recorded. The mythologic texts deal with the gods of war, fertility, justice, magic, and learning. In addition to the heroic lays of the Elder Edda, we will also read Beowulf and Icelandic prose texts, including a saga.

German 295: German Green Technologies. This course examines the roots and culture of environmentalism in Germany, including its long history with recycling and Germans’ fascination with and appreciation for nature, the Greens political party, and current environmental initiatives in Germany, including the newest innovations regarding green technology and how they are received by and marketed to the German people. The course will also investigate environmental initiatives within other countries in Europe and how European Union regulations have influenced Europe’s green innovations. Current green practices within the U.S. and other countries around the world will also be discussed to serve as a comparison to current practices within Germany and Europe.

German 310: German Conversation. (Prereq.: Germ 210 and 211 or equivalent) This course continues attention to all four skills with focus on conversation within the context of cultural awareness for the period before 1945. One longer text will be read in preparation for the upper division literature and culture sequence and the course includes a grammar review. Emphasis is placed on correct, idiomatic oral expression.

German 311: German Conversation & Composition. (Prereq.: Germ 210 and 211 or equivalent) This course continues attention to all four skills with focus on conversation and composition. Course content centers on cultural awareness for the period after 1945. One longer text will be read in preparation for the upper division literature and culture sequence and the course includes a grammar review. A student who has completed this course is eligible to participate in the Bamberg Exchange Program.

German 316: Introduction to German for Business & Other Professions. (Prereq: Germ 211 or consent of instructor) Development of basic language and cultural skills necessary for functioning in the business and professional world of German-speaking countries. 

German 320: German Kabarett. (prereq.: Germ 310 or consent of instructor). Literary-historical analysis and discussion of texts from German Kabarett, including comedic skits, political and social satire, parody, humorous poetry. Semester ends with a public performance in German! Immersion into German language and culture through involvement with theatre production and performance. The analysis, discussion, adaptation and memorization of mainly literary texts from German Kabarett will increase students’ reading, speaking, writing, and interpersonal skills, while also introducing their ability to „relate“ to German in social settings. Additional emphasis is put on aspects and practice of German pronunciation and enunciation.

German 333: Study Abroad

German 340: Reading in German Literature. (Prereq.: Germ 310 and 311 or consent of instructor) This course is designed to start you thinking about German literature. We’ll introduce you to a number of literary genres (drama, poetry, the short story, and the German Novelle); and at the same time equip you with strategies for reading longer texts in a foreign language more efficiently. Read works by authors like Goethe, Lessing, Eichendorff, Keller, Rilke, Brecht, Böll, and Dürrenmatt; and get to know more about their historical contexts. A paper and a presentation are required. Readings and discussions in German.

German 401P: Practicum in Teaching German to Young Children. (Coreq: Must be concurrently enrolled in German 210 or higher and German 401 or have permission of instructor)
This course provides students with field experience in teaching German to young children. The class meets at Brennen Elementary School or at A.C. Moore Elementary School once per week. We will meet to preview the day’s lesson for a half hour and the children will be in the classroom for the next 45 minutes.

German 410Advanced German Grammar. The prerequisite is German 310 and 311 or equivalent course work in German. Although attention will be paid to all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, the special focus of the course is German grammar. Grammar topics covered in the course will be the more difficult points of German grammar and usage.  

German 411: Advanced Language Practice in German. (Prereq.: Germ 310 311, or consent of instructor). Advanced practice in oral and written German, emphasis is placed on refinement of student's writing skills. In this course, all four skills are polished as it is intended to develop language proficiency necessary to communicate in a job situation. A national standardized Oral Proficiency Test is offered upon request to assess the level of communication skills. 

German 416: Advanced German for Business and Other Professions. (Prereq.: Germ 316 or consent of instructor) Development of advanced language and cultural skills necessary for functioning in the professional world of German-speaking countries. Preparation for standardized exams. 

German 420: Survey of German literature and culture of the Middle Ages. Germanic, Old High German, classical Middle High German, and late Middle High German periods. Mythological poetry, heroic poetry, magic charms, documents of conversion, gospel harmony, courtly love lyric, gnomic poetry, courtly romance, and mystical writings. Germanic, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. The movements in literature and art set against the social and political developments of the Early, High and Late Middle Ages.

German 430: The German Enlightenment and its Countercurrents. German literature and culture of the 18th century with emphasis on the period between 1750 and Weimar Classicism. May include major works by Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller.

German 440: German Literature and Culture from 1800-1871.Introduction to enduring works of German literature, music, art, and thought of the 19th century. The young generation of Romantics and the birth of the German national movementm early responses to industrialization and the transition from medieval feudal structures to more democratic and progressive modes of political and sociological thinking. The globally significant works of Wagner, Marx, and Nietzsche.

German 450: German Literature from 1871-1945. German literary, cultural, and intellectual developments from Unification to the end of WWII, including Naturalism, Expressionism, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the exile period.

German 460: Post-War and Contemporary German Literature. Post-1945 German literature and film in its cultural, political, and historical context.  The special situation of post-war Germany in the wake of WWII and the Holocaust, division during the Cold War, reunification as a multi-ethnic nation within the European community. Austrian and Swiss identity in an increasingly multi-national, multi-cultural "German" literary scene.


German Graduate Courses

German 500: Survey of German Culture. (3) (Prereq: advanced reading ability in German) Survey of the most significant aspects of German culture from Roman times to the late 20th century, including the visual arts, music, philosophy, and film, but with special emphasis on providing a coherent overview of literary periods and movements. Readings in the course will include a short history of Germany and a brief survey of literary history as well as select, usually non-literary, texts providing significant additional insight into German-speaking culture.

German 515: Introduction to German Linguistics. [=LING 503] (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Structural and descriptive linguistics applied to the German language.

German 516: History of the German Language. [=LING 733] (3) Development of German in the Germanic, Old High German, Middle High German, and New High German periods. Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and the relationship between dialects and the standard language.

German 517: Introduction to the Germanic. Languages [=LING 533] (3) Introduction to historical Germanic linguistics including a survey of the Old Germanic languages (Old English, Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German, Old Norse, Gothic); comparative phonology, morphology, and syntax, typology of modern Germanic languages and dialects; and common Germanic in its Indo-European context.

German 518: German Sociolinguistics. [=LING 548] (3) Introduction to the study of variation in Modern German. Traditional German dialectology and dialect geography, language and society, multilingualism in the German-speaking countries, German in contact with other languages.

German 575: Teaching German in Secondary Schools. [=EDSE 578] (3) Current methods, techniques, and materials of instruction appropriate for secondary schools.

German 580: Topics in German Film. (3) Examination of recurring themes and issues or of significant periods and influential styles in German Film. Course content varies and individual topics will be announced with course suffix and title.

German 598: Selected Topics in German. (3) (Prereq: consent of instructor) Reading and research on selected topics in German. Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of courses by suffix and title.

German 700: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. (3) Introduction to literary methods in the field of German, combined with practical instruction in bibliography and in the preparation of elementary research projects.

German 710: Middle High German. (3) Study of Middle High German language and literature with special emphasis on the lyric and epic poetry of the late 12th and early 13th centuries.

German 711: Selected Topics in Old Germanic Languages. (3) Reading and translation of texts in one of the Old Germanic languages: Old High German (H), Old Saxon (S), Old Norse (N), or Gothic (G). May be repeated for credit with a different letter suffix. Reading knowledge of Modern German required.

German 720: The German Renaissance and Baroque. (3) Reading and interpretation of significant literary works of the 16th and 17th centuries.

German 730: The German Enlightenment and its Counter-Currents. (3) Reading and discussion of key literary and theoretical works from specific 18th-century movements, including Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Weimar Classicism.

German 740: German Romanticism. (3) Investigation of German Romanticism as a theoretical project articulated in philosophical texts, as well as literary, visual and musical arts. literary works and personalities.

German 750: German Realism. (3) German Realism, its major literary works and background.

German 760: German Literature from 1889 to 1945. (3) Currents of German literature since Naturalism, accompanied by critical reading of characteristic works by major writers of the period.

German 770: Recent and Contemporary German Literature. (3) The development of German literature since World War II, through critical reading and interpretation of major representative works.

German 775: Seminars on Selected Topics in Foreign Language Education. [=EDSE 785, =FREN 775, =LATN 775, =SPAN 775] (3) (Prereq: permission of instructor) Topics will be identified by suffix and title in the schedule of classes. Each topic may be taken only once.

German 776: The Teaching of German in College I. (2) Basic principles of teaching German combined with practical demonstrations. Does not count toward M.A. or M.A.T.

German 777: The Teaching of German in College II. (1) Basic principles of teaching German combined with practical demonstrations. This course will not count toward the M.A. or M.A.T. degree. Spring only.

German 780, 781: German Seminar. (3 each) Content varies.

German 790: Directed Reading and Research. (3)

German 799: Thesis Preparation. (1-9)


 
German Courses Taught in English
 
These courses fulfill various requirements:
 

Carolina Core / General Education Requirements. 

Literature requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences

Cultural awareness requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences and Sciences.

 

German 230: The Idea of Nature in Germany. The idea of nature in Germany from the 18th century to today. Focus on scientific, technological, philosophical, practical, social and political entanglements that prompt radical shifts in how German thinkers view nature.  

German 270: Knights and Ladies. The course is an introduction to Middle High German courtly literature. The history and culture of the High Middle Ages will provide the background for the readings. The roles of men and women, such as the serving knight, the lord, the lady, and the literary patron will stand at the center of discussions. The major genres/texts analyzed include the courtly romances Erec, Iwein, Parzival, and Tristan, the Nibelungenlied, and the courtly love lyrics of Walther von der Vogelweide, Reinmar von Hagenau, and Heinrich von Morungen.

German 280: Survey of German Culture & Civilization. Multimedia (Powerpoint, film, music) introduction to the length and breadth of German culture, starting with the arrival in the 5th century of the Germanic tribes into western and southern Europe, and ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall and resultant unification of Germany in 1989/90. The focus will be on culture inthe widest sense, meaning not only attention to the peaks of literature, the visual arts, and music, but also to the development of major trends in thoughtas formulated by significant philosophers and reflected in the political and social transformation of Germany.

German 290: Viking Mythology. The course is an introduction to the mythology and heroic poetry of Viking Age Scandinavia. The history and culture of the Germanic tribes will provide background for the readings. Attention will be paid to Icelandic society at the time the myths and much of the heroic poetry were recorded. The mythologic texts deal with the gods of war, fertility, justice, magic, and learning. In addition to the heroic lays of the Elder Edda, we will also read Beowulf and Icelandic prose texts, including a saga.

German 295: German Green Technologies. This course examines the roots and culture of environmentalism in Germany, including its long history with recycling and Germans’ fascination with and appreciation for nature, the Greens political party, and current environmental initiatives in Germany, including the newest innovations regarding green technology and how they are received by and marketed to the German people. The course will also investigate environmental initiatives within other countries in Europe and how European Union regulations have influenced Europe’s green innovations. Current green practices within the U.S. and other countries around the world will also be discussed to serve as a comparison to current practices within Germany and Europe.

German 580: Topics in German Film. Examination of recurring themes and issues or of significant periods and influential styles in German film. Course content varies and individual topics will be announced with course suffix and title.

 

Topics courses

German 398A: Germany in the Twenties. 

German 398C: Germany Under Hitler. Who was Adolf Hitler? 

German 398K: Genius and Genocide.

German 398Y: Berlin: Topographies of the Twentieth Century.

 

Honors College Courses

SCHC 365A: Goethe's Life and Major Works. 

SCHC 365D: Wagner: On Trial.

SCHC 365F: Our Hitler.