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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures


Faculty & Staff Directory

María Mabrey

Professor & Spanish Program Director
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures
University of South Carolina

Office: HUO 920
Email: mabreym@mailbox.sc.edu
Vitae: Download PDF
Mabrey

              My areas of interest and research: Spanish Contemporary Literature; Film Studies and Culture; Women’s Studies; Comparative Literature; Spain and Latin America Cultural interconnections. Throughout my career as scholar I have discovered a broad range of geographies and academic subjects. My passion for poetry written by women and the avant-garde movements of early twentieth century have taken me to make incursions in other fields, such as film, cultural theory, and women artists of Spain and Latin America. All along, my studies have given me personal joy as I have been able to introduce to my students many authors, literary works and films unknown to them. I consider students’ research an extension of my own, and I have gained from my students’ research by directing their theses and mentoring their papers and dissertations. Their curiosity helps me to stride on my own path to literature, culture and film. My admiration for the Latin American civilization and my study of some of the most interesting contemporary authors and filmmakers has led me to find important and stimulating interconnections between Spain and Latin America through film, narrative, and poetry. I have pursued these connections guided by my original interests as a student. The paintings of Frida Khalo, Norah Borges, Maruja Mallo, the editorial work of Victoria Ocampo and Luzmaría Jiménez Faro, the intriguing short stories of Cristina Peri Rossi or poems by Ernestina de Champourcin, Gloria Fuertes or Julia Uceda are most dear to me. I have studied and published on the great works of Federico García Lorca written during his trip to America, and particularly his master piece, Poet in New York. This study is still an on-going undertaking and many times I look at it through the work of American contemporary poets, such as Allen Ginsberg and painters like Jasper Johns. Currently I am working on several projects involving Spanish and Latin American women intellectuals (mujeres de letras) in exile. I am also working on a book-length project exploring the plastic arts and women of the avant-garde movements (Dada and Surrealism) who created, in or outside these movements, an extraordinary art, and saw the world with new, feminine eyes.