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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures


Spanish Course Descriptions

ALL COURSES AT THE INTERMEDIATE LEVEL AND ABOVE ARE TAUGHT IN SPANISH unless otherwise specified.

Undergraduate courses are numbered 100-599; graduate courses are numbered 500-799.

SPAN 109 Beginning Spanish I.

Introduction to grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to SPAN 109 is reserved exclusively for those who have never studied Spanish or have not studied Spanish within the past five (5) years, or have placed into this class according to the results of his/her Phase I placement exam.

SPAN 110 Beginning Spanish II

Continuation of grammar and practical vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills. Admission to SPAN 110 is reserved exclusively for those who have successfully completed SPAN 109 at USC. SPAN 109 is reserved exclusively for those who have never studied Spanish or have not studied Spanish within the past five (5) years, or have scored an S1 on USC Phase I placement exam.

SPAN 121 Elementary Spanish

Grammar and vocabulary necessary for fundamental communication skills will be covered. This course assumes prior experience in Spanish. Admission to SPAN 121 is reserved exclusively for those who have taken the USC Spanish Phase 1 Placement Exam and received the score of S2.

Spanish 122 Basic Proficiency in Spanish

Practice and further development of essential listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills will be covered. Admission to SPAN 122 is reserved exclusively for those who have taken the USC Spanish Phase I Placement Exam and received the score of S3 OR have successfully completed SPAN 110, SPAN 111 or SPAN 121.

This course continues the development of basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Spanish, along with the study of the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. Students in Arts and Sciences(and those in many other colleges) must successfully complete this course to fulfill the language requirement.

Spanish 122 is designed for students who have already taken Spanish 109 and 110, or Spanish 111, or Spanish 121. It is also open to students who have studied Spanish before coming to the University and who have received the corresponding score on the Department’s placement test. It is expected that students in this class will have a basic familiarity with essential vocabulary (greetings, numbers, days and months, time, family terms, homes and furniture, description of people, daily routine) and key grammatical structures (present tense verbs, the verb gustar, noun-adjective agreement, basic word order for statements and questions).

Everyday class work includes practicing new vocabulary and grammar and applying these studies to practical, real-life situations, such as finding your way around a city, explaining your symptoms to a doctor, haggling over prices in a market, inviting a friend to a movie, and telling stories about past experiences. We also watch videos related to Hispanic cultures and focus on a different Spanish-speaking country each chapter.

Homework includes listening to recorded conversations on audio CDs, completing exercises in a workbook, and reading short articles, poems or stories. Generally, the first drafts of compositions are written during class time; and the second (final) drafts, outside of class. There are several quizzes and three exams each semester. At the end of the semester all students must demonstrate that they have achieved basic proficiency in Spanish by passing all sections of an Exit Exam. This exam contains speaking, listening, reading and writing sections; each section is scored independently of the others on a pass-fail basis. Students who fail a section may retake it one time.

The Honors sections feature special projects and an increased emphasis on conversational Spanish.

SPAN 207 Intermediate Oral Practice

Prerequisites: Prior completion of SPAN 122 or equivalent. Learning the sound system of Spanish well is typically quite difficult for most English-speaking students, and the focus of this class will be practical: how to improve your pronunciation of Spanish. There will beextensive practice and activities (songs, tongue twisters, poetry, etc.), along with some readings, to help you understand the ins-and-outs of what goes on in a Spanish-speaker’s mouth (and mind).

SPAN 209 Intermediate Spanish I

Practice and further development of essential speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Admission either by Spanish Proficiency Tests I and II or successful completion of 122.

SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish II

Practice and further development of essential speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Admission either by Spanish Proficiency Tests I and II or successful completion of Spanish 209.

SPAN 211 Intensive Intermediate Spanish

Practice and further development of essential speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. The drama Nosotros somos dios by Wilberto Cantón will also be read. Admission either by Spanish Proficiency Tests I and II or successful completion of Spanish 122.

SPAN 301 Service Learning Course

Spanish 301 Service Learning is an independent study course which allows students of Spanish who are at the intermediate or advanced levels of proficiency to put their language skills to use in serving the Spanish-speaking communities of South Carolina.

Students who receive credit for this course must commit between 15-20 hours of community service during the semester. Credits earned are from 1 to 2 and the grade is Pass or Fail. It does not replace a core Spanish program course (major or minor). Contact the Spanish Program Director for more information. 

SPAN 302 Advanced Spanish 

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in SPAN 210 or 211, by Phase II placement exam, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students. In-depth study of advanced grammatical structures of Spanish to develop proviciency in all 4 skills and cultural compentency. Gateway course for Spanish majors. 

SPAN 303 Cultural Readings and Advanced Composition

Prerequisite: SPAN 302, by Phase II placement exam, or consent of instructor. Department permission required for transfer students. Development of advanced composition skills in Spanish on a variety of topics related to cultural production of the Spanish-seapking world. 

SPAN 305 Working with Hispanic Clients

Cross-cultural approaches to interactions with persons of Hispanic origin in a variety of professional settings. This course has two purposes: a) a cross-cultural orientation, especially related to issues faced by Hispanics living in the United States; and b) a pre-professional orientation; knowledge and vocabulary useful for working with Hispanics in the U.S in a variety of professional areas.

SPAN 312 Reading Hispanic Literary Texts/Literary Criticism

Prerequisites: Students must have passed SPAN 302 with the grade of B or higher. This course is an introduction to literary criticism. It focuses on literary terms and its applications in close readings of selected Spanish and Spanish-American texts. The course has four sections that correspond to the four main literary genres: Fiction, Poetry, Drama and Essay. Along with the study of the specific subject matter, this course includes cultural and historical background for each text to be studied.

SPAN 316 Business Spanish

Commercial organizations and business in Spanish-speaking countries, business correspondence, terminology, and techniques in commercial transactions. Standardized examinations available such as the Certificado de la Cámara de Comercio de Madrid.

SPAN 317 Spanish Phonetics & Pronunciation

Prerequisites: Placement at 300 level on Phase II placement exam, grade of C+ or better in SPAN 302, or consent of instructor. Analysis of and practice in pronunciation and listening comprehension.

SPAN 350 Spanish Language Study Abroad

Intensive language practice in native environment with emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; community contact and homestay.

SPAN 375 Topics in Hispanic Cultures and Literatures

Course content varies and will be announced in the schedule of classes by suffix and title.

SPAN 380A Spanish Film

This course is an introduction to film aesthetics through the screening of motion pictures created by Spanish filmmakers or based on Spanish themes (i.e. Carmen by Francesco Rosi). The films represent Spain’s society, history and culture of the twentieth century. They also expose the talents of those Spanish film directors who worked under censorship restrictions imposed on them by dictatorship. Film industry and film aesthetics were liberalized after 1975, when Spain began the process of “Transition” to democracy. Today Spanish movie directors enjoy a freedom of speech and creativity that makes Spanish cinema one of the most open and widely praised internationally. This course studies through the medium of film these two periods (censorship/freedom of speech) in Spanish cultural history.

SPAN 380B Spanish-American Film and Culture

This course focuses on Spanish-American Film: Study of Spanish-American film history, film discourse, techniques and main themes of the genre in the 20th century. As such, it will explore the connections between film, society, history, culture, gender issues, and politics. Due to the extensive number and diversity of the countries (multiracial, multilingual, and diverse immigration in each area), this course will concentrate on the most significant films produced in the main four regions: Caribbean, Central American, Andean, and Southern Cone.

SPAN 398 Selected Topics

Intensive study of selected topics of the Hispanic world.

SPAN 399 Independent Study

SPAN 400 Spain: Civilization and Culture

This course is an introduction to Spain’s origins, civilization and culture through the interconnectivity with other major civilizations (Roman, Arab, American) up to the present day. The course is an overview and requires a concerted effort by the student to become familiar with all the required texts for the course, either written or visual. Spanish history is long and complex. The course focuses on critical periods and events that have substantially transformed the Spanish culture and produced the fabric of European Spain today.

SPAN 401 Spanish American Civilization and Culture

The course will cover the history, civilization and culture of Latin America from the Discovery to the present century, and includes lectures, visuals, and readings on selected topics of Spanish American civilization and its cultural heritage. The course emphasizes Spanish America during the 20th Century covering the most important aspects and events related to its cultures. The students will develop an understanding and appreciation of Spanish America through geography, economics, politics, arts, society, and customs, and finally its relationship with the outside world. Textbook: Latinoamérica, su civilización y su cultura by Chang Rodriguez, and materials selected by the professor. Requirements: 2 exams and a final paper.

SPAN 404 Literary Tendencies and Masterpieces of Spain

A survey of the masterworks and literary tendencies of Spain from the medieval period to the current time. This course aims to acquaint the student both with literary periods and works, and to provide the necessary background of the literary, historical and political movements to better comprehend the authors and their works. Class format is discussion of assigned texts, student presentations, and several films that provide an overview for the various movements studied. The text is Voces de Espana (Thomson-Heinle, 2005). Requirements: three exams, a 10-15 minute presentation, and two short research papers. All readings, discussions, and papers are in Spanish. Taught every spring semester. Counts for the major requirement for an advanced literature class.

SPAN 405 Literary Tendencies and Masterpieces of Spanish America

A survey of the masterworks and literary tendencies of Spanish America. Survey of the most significant works from the Colonial period through the present. This course aims to acquaint the student both with literary periods and works, and to provide the necessary background of the literary, historical and political movements to better comprehend the authors and their works. The professor will select an anthology of readings from, for example, Voces de Hispanoamérica by Chang-Rodriguez, and a selection of poems and short stories compiled by the professor. Requirements: 2 tests (60%) and a final exam (40%).

SPAN 409 Introduction to Stylistics in Spanish

Prerequisite: SPAN 309 or consent of instructor Written application of advanced Spanish grammar structures and composition techniques; directed writing exercises based on model reading selections.

SPAN 417 Advanced Business Spanish and the Professions

Vocabulary, concepts, and oral/written skills necessary to communicate effectively in the social, cultural, or economic infrastructure of Hispanic countries. Introduction to the use of technology for the acquisition and processing of materials relevant to students' professional goals.

SPAN 499 Senior Seminar

A special seminar devoted to the in-depth study of selected subjects in Hispanic literature, culture, or language. Required for the intensive major in Spanish. All courses at the graduate level taught in Spanish, unless otherwise noted.

SPAN 500 Contemporary Spain

Offered in the summer This course is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students seeking to gain an overview and a general understanding of the major historical events of Spain in the twentieth century and how they have affected Spain’s contemporary culture. Some of these major events include Spain's Second Republic, the Civil War, Franco’s Dictatorship, the transition to pluralistic rule (La Transición), and the present-day democracy (La Democracia). A combination of traditional and visual texts will be studied and analyzed.

SPAN 501 Contemporary Spanish America

Offered in the summer The course will emphasize Spanish America during the 20th and 21st-centuries covering the most important aspects and events related to the culture. The objectives of the course are to develop an understanding and appreciation of the Spanish American world through geography, economics, politics fine arts, society, and customs; to understand the religious, philosophical, political and economic ideas that are shaping the modern world and their relationship with the outside world, USA in particular; and to develop appreciation of selected literary and artistic works as product of the Spanish American cultures. Materials are selected and prepared by the professor: selected readings, movies, videos, newspapers, Internet, and other sources. Participation in class is very important. The students must present at least one report on any country. The subject of the report must be based on the latest issues and events in that particular country. The requirements are: 2 exams, 1or 2 oral presentations, and a final paper. Important note: Some material may not agree with your personal, social, political, and religious beliefs.

SPAN 512 Advanced Writing and Research in Spanish Language and Cultural Studies

Required of all M. A. students in Spanish - Offered in the fall. This course is designed to prepare graduate and advanced undergraduate students (M.A.; M.A.T.; M.T.) to become competent in using modern Spanish for academic writing. In addition, the course is an introduction to research methods with the objective of mastering strategies to write research papers and thesis responding critically to a variety of texts within the four major literary genres.

SPAN 515 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics [= LING 504]

Required of all M.A.T. students in Spanish - Normally taught in the fall. In this course we will develop an increased awareness of the marvel that is human language, and in particular, the Spanish language. We will pose such questions as, "What is language? How is it used? How does it work?" Although these questions may seem trivial -- after all, we all know how to use our native language without any particular conscious effort -- we will discover that there is an important distinction between knowing how to use a language and knowing precisely how it works. By analyzing the grammatical structures of Spanish (in the widest sense of the term 'grammar', including the sound system) and making comparisons with English, we will achieve a greater understanding of how the Spanish language works (and to a lesser degree, how English does too). We will see how the meanings we wish to communicate are encoded in structures, and how these are then transmitted via sound. Consequently we will be in a better position to anticipate and answer the questions that our students ask us, and to respond with precision, clarity and confidence. The goals of the course are the following:

To show the existence of recurrent structures in Spanish, which is a system of symbols. These regularities occur in all languages of the world, and at all levels of language: sound-, word-, meaning- and sentence structure.

To encourage the self-examination of one's thoughts, attitudes and beliefs about language; to become aware of the diversity of human language and its systematicity.

To be able to apply what is learned to improve the teaching of Spanish in our classes.

To develop and retain in the future a more profound comprehension of the miracle of language.

Topics to be covered include: the sounds and sound structure of Spanish; syllabification, emphasis and written accentuation; various ways that words are put together in Spanish; the structure of verbal tenses; different types of pronouns and their implications for language teaching; the 10 types of se; the various types of subordination and coordination; a sketch of the history of the Spanish language; and others.

SPAN 516 The Structure of Modern Spanish [= LING 554]

This course provides a description of the grammatical structures (morphology and syntax) of Modern Spanish. In addition, a historical component for each topic helps students understand how Spanish came to be structured as it is today. SPAN 516 meets American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) teacher certification (NCATE) standards for Understanding Linguistics in the areas of morphology, syntax, semantics, rules for word and sentence formation, changing nature of language, sociolinguistic variation, and comparisons between target and other languages. This course is intended for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in the Spanish and Linguistics programs. Serves as an elective for the undergraduate minor and major in Spanish, including the recently approved undergraduate teacher certification option, and for the minor or BAIS major in Linguistics. The course will likewise be of interest to students with an interest in translation and interpretation of Spanish.

SPAN 517 Contrastive English-Spanish Phonetics and Phonology[= LING 514]

Normally taught in the summer. This course will provide a general introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology and their application to the sounds and sound systems of English and Spanish. We will learn enough of the anatomy of the vocal tract to begin to figure out how the tongue, lips, larynx and other articulators work together to produce speech. Another important part of the course will be to learn how to produce and recognize the sounds of the two languages, as well as to increase awareness of the differences between them so as to facilitate improvement of pronunciation. To that end there will be extensive practice in broad and narrow phonetic transcription, accentuation and orthography. We will also work on the development of techniques to teach pronunciation of both English and Spanish. Additionally, we will see how the sounds of Spanish have changed over time and some of the principal dialectal varieties of Modern Spanish. The course will be taught in English, as the content is relevant to students who intend to pursue careers teaching Spanish to nonnative speakers, as well as to those who will teach English to Spanish speakers. Knowledge of Spanish will be helpful, however.

SPAN 518 Introduction to Spanish Medieval Literature

Survey of Spanish literature form its first manifestations to La Celestina. Introduction; early works; the epic; 13th- through 15th-century prose and verse; Berceo, Alfonso X, Juan Ruiz, Marques de Santillana; others.

SPAN 524 Renaissance and Golden Age Literature

An introduction to Spanish narrative, poetry and theater of the Transition from a Feudal to a Mercantile society during the 16th and 17th centuries. Topics: The representation of early bourgeois values; the birth of the public theater; the formation of modern forms of subjectivity in poetry; the reinforcement of seigniorial beliefs and the emergence of Absolutism. The goal is to discuss relations between literature, theater and ideology in Spanish Classical culture. Texts by Lope de Vega, Calderón, Tirso de Molina, Garcilaso de la Vega, Quevedo, Góngora, and Lazarillo de Tormes.

SPAN 534 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature

This course will focus specifically on the prose, poetry, and drama that have traditionally been included in Spain’s nineteenth-century literary canon. Because of this century’s dichotomy (in Spain) between Romanticism and Realism, the course as such will be divided accordingly. In addition to the authors to be studied, outside assignments (for presentations and papers) will deal with other works of Spanish Romanticism and Realism. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with Spanish literature of the nineteenth century in the context of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment as well as the political and social upheavals that plagued nineteenth-century Spain (as precursor to the Spanish Civil War of the twentieth century). A Xeroxed packet of selections from (complete) works as well as entire texts will be used. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (latest edition) will be used in the preparation of all papers, and Spanish will be the language of instruction (all papers and presentations are to be done in Spanish).

SPAN 538 Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

Survey of major Peninsular writers from the Generation of 1898 to the present. This course will focus specifically on representative works of prose, poetry, and drama that have traditionally been included in Spain’s twentieth-century literary canon. Because the works of this century constitute a second golden age in the history of Spanish letters, and given the impossible task of discussing fully each genre and period, all outside assignments (for papers and presentations) will deal with works not included for class discussion in order to provide as broad a panorama of Spain’s literary achievements of this century. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (latest edition) will be used in the preparation of the final paper, and Spanish will be the language of instruction (all papers and presentations are to be done in Spanish).

SPAN 543 Spanish-American Literature from the Independence Through Modernism

Survey of the most significant works of the independence through Modernism. The course covers from 1810 through 1910 and by utilizing Spanish-American all genres and the most important authors and works intents to acquaint the students with both works and literary periods, and its historical and socio-political frame. The instructor will make a selection of authors and works. In some cases, especially in narrative, the student have to read the novels completely. A sample of the list of writers and selections composed by the professor is: Simón Bolivar, Esteban Echevarría, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Ricardo Palma, José Martí and Rubén Darío. Usually the requirements are: 2 exams and a final research paper. The students must follow the MLA style.

SPAN 550 Advanced Language Study Abroad

Intensive language practice in a native environment with special emphasis on oral skills. Instruction by native speakers; extensive community contact and home stay.

SPAN 555 Spanish American Literature from Modernism through 1960

Utilizing Spanish American poetry, narrative and essays from Modernism through 1960, this course intends to acquaint students with the most relevant authors, their literary periods and works. Some authors that will be included are Rómulo Gallegos, José Eustasio Rivera, Ricardo Guiraldes, Maria Luisa Bombal, Mariano Azuela, and Miguel Angel Asturias.

SPAN 557 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature

Survey of the most significant works from 1960 to the present. Spanish American literature from the 1960s through the 1990s. Utilizing a selection of Spanish American narrative, theater, poetry and essay, this course intends to acquaint the student with the most relevant writers, their literary period and their works. Some authors and works to be discussed include Rosario Castellanos (El eterno femenino), Manuel Puig (El beso de la mujer araña), José Donoso (El lugar sin límites), Mario Vargas Llosa (Casa verde), and Rigoberta Menchú (Me llamo Rigoberta Menchú y así me nació la conciencia). Also, a selection of poetry, dramas, and essays compiled by the professor will be available. Requirements: 2 exams, 1 presentation, and a final paper.

SPAN 615 Intensive Readings in Spanish

Intensive reading for non-majors. Graduate students fulfill their foreign language reading requirement with successful completion of the course. Undergraduates may take the course as an elective only. Grades S/U for graduates and undergraduates.

SPAN 711 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

Required of all M. A. students in Spanish Taught in the Spring An overview of twentieth-century literary theories and methodologies used in literary analysis. This course will teach students the fundamental principles of literary discourse in Spanish by way of the study and discussion of the tenets of twentieth-century literary theory as they apply to literary texts written in Spanish. The goal of this course is to enhance critical discourse written in Spanish by applying various paradigms/models of twentieth-century literary theory and criticism to selected works written in Spanish for the purpose of sharpening critical analysis, interpretation, and appreciation as well as appreciating the role of literary theory in general, and of the twentieth-century in particular.

SPAN 715 History of the Spanish Language [= LING 734]

This course will trace the evolution of the Spanish language from its beginnings as a regional dialect of spoken Latin to the present day. We will consider internal/structural changes in the language (its sounds and sound system, word and sentence structure, vocabulary) and discuss the external factors that have shaped its development over time (e.g., invasions, migrations, contacts with other languages and cultures). Part of the course will be dedicated to discussion of geographic variation, including Peninsular dialects, American Spanish, Judeo-Spanish (Ladino) and Spanish-based creoles (e.g., Papiamento).

SPAN 722: Cervantes

A discussion of Cervantes' narrative work and, in particular, of the cultural, ideological and ideological significance of Don Quijote. Textual analysis and critical theories combine to open the work to current interpretations with the goal to provide access to the aesthetic possibilities immersed within the novel: parody, satire, along the transformations taken place in Early Modern Spain.

SPAN 724: Renaissance and Baroque Poetry and Drama

A critical reading of major trends in Spanish Renaissance and Baroque poetry, and a discussion of their function within the cultural and ideological transformation of Early Modern times. The goal is to provide an analysis of the field of poetic discourse during the 16th and 17th centuries in relation to the emergence of a literary representation of subjectivity. Relations between oral and written practices. Poetical conventions and philosophical, religious and social issues.

SPAN 730 Contemporary Spanish Prose Fiction

Emphasis on the post-Spanish Civil War narrative. Course description: This course will study a number of the acclaimed Spanish novels and short stories written after 1939. Because this period in Spanish letters is so prolific, the works chosen represent the major trends that fashioned Spain’s narrative (prose fiction) as it emerged from the Civil War (1936-1939). While framed within their corresponding socio-historical contexts, discussion of these works will emphasize an eclectic approach to the application of literary theory (close readings are crucial and the focus is process-oriented rather than lecture-based). A seminar format will be used. In this regard, students will be encouraged to supplement their reading of the primary creative and critical texts with secondary materials. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (latest edition) will be used in the preparation of all papers, and Spanish will be the language of instruction (all papers and presentations are to be done in Spanish). The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth study of selected Spanish works of prose fiction with the goal of fostering independent research and scholarly study of novels and short stories that are not covered in classroom discussions.

SPAN 732 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Prose and Poetry

Intensive reading of major works of Spanish Romanticism and Realism. Course description: This course will focus specifically on the following writers and their works: (from the Romantic period) Mariano José de Larra, Mesonero Romanos, Angel Saavedra, José Zorrilla, José de Espronceda, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, and Rosalía de Castro; (from the Realist period) Benito Pérez Galdós, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Carmen de Burgos, Clarín, Vicente Blasco Ibáñez, José Echegaray, and Manuel Tamayo y Baus. A Xeroxed collection as well as entire texts will be used. A seminar format will be used (numerous outside readings [i.e., Octavio Paz’s Los hijos del limo] will serve as frame for classroom discussion). The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (latest edition) is to be used in the preparation of all written work (to be turned in), and Spanish will be the language of instruction (all papers and presentations will be done in Spanish). The goal of this course is to provide an in-depth study of selected authors and their works.

SPAN 733: Trans-Atlantic Perspectives

The course explores the interconnections between Spain and the Americas in order to discuss a number of issues relating to processes of articulation and assimilation between the Spanish legacy and America's cultures, together with the African dimension. Readings on the social, economic, and political contexts will stimulate reflection and a questioning of some of the traditional notions of national, cultural and ethnic identities.

SPAN 734 Poetry of the Generation of 1927

This course explores the works of the so-called Generation of 1927, a group of poets and scholars whose influence has been felt throughout the twentieth century and beyond. They are considered to be an integral part of Spain’s Silver Age. A selection of texts written by major poets, three women, and minor poets of the Generation of 1927 will be the major texts for the course. The avant-garde movements in Spain produced countless works of art, and for its close relation to the Generation, films by Buñuel and Surrealist paintings will be examined in conjunction with the poetry.

SPAN 736 The Generation of 1898

Essay, verse, drama, and fiction of the major writers of this Generation. This course will focus specifically on the works of those writers who have traditionally been grouped together to form the canon of what has been called “The Generation of 1898" in Spain: Azorín, Pío Baroja, Antonio Machado, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramón María del Valle-Inclán, and others. To be studied is a selection of their essays, novels, short stories, poetry, and theatre. An anthology as well as the entire texts of various works will be used. Outside readings will be assigned form time to time. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (latest edition) will be used in the preparation of all written work (to be turned in), and Spanish will be the language of instruction (all papers and presentations will be done in Spanish). In addition to familiarizing students with this period of Spanish letters, the goal of this course is to provide a clear awareness of the literary themes, techniques and theories which were of seminal importance for the rest of the century’s literary production.

SPAN 746 Post-Baroque Spanish Drama

A graduate seminar focusing on the application of Spanish and European major stage theories to modern Spanish theatre. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study of contemporary Spanish drama and the contributions of Spanish playwrights to modern styles of writing and producing plays. The impact that modern European theatre performances had on Spanish playwrights will be examined. Works by Moratín, Benavente, Tamayo y Baus, García Lorca, Valle-Inclán, Mihura, Buero Vallejo and Arrabal will be explored together with Pirandello, Artaud, Becket and Brecht.

SPAN 751. Twentieth-Century Spanish American Short Story

Spanish-American short story from 1901 through 2000, with in-depth study of the most significant authors of the 20th-Century. This course will acquaint the student with the literary periods, historical frame and the geographical spaces in which the works were created. The professor will make a selection of the authors and short stories to be discussed in class and to be researched for the final project. Some authors to be studied include Borges, Bombal, Donoso, Mallea, Cortázar, Quiroga, Rojas, Rulfo, Arreola and Ramírez. Requirements: Active participation, 2 exams and a final research paper (MLA format).

SPAN 752: Twentieth-Century Spanish Exile Literature

This course will study the creative works which high profile Spanish writers wrote while in exile (in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Argentina, and the U.S.) during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and the ensuing Francoist regime (1939-1975), hence the course's trans-Atlantic focus. These writers' prior works (before leaving Spain) will serve as background for an in-depth discussion of the stylistics/technical, ideological, and thematic aspects of their trans-Atlantic literary productivity. Attention will be paid to the artistic communities which grew from this dialogue and which resulted in the creation of Ibero-American centers of creative excellence, such as El Colegio de México. By way of selected topics for the final paper and a follow-up colloquium, students will compare these works written in exile with those of other Spaniards, such as, for example, Jorge Semprón, Fernando Arrabal, Juan Goytisolo, and María Zambrano, whose chosen places of exile were France, Italy, Switzerland, etc. The course will also make mention of the flourishing sub-genre of literatura memorialística (literature of memory) which provides a personal narrative account of experiences also rooted in one form or another of exile literature.

SPAN 763 Contemporary Spanish-American Narrative

Emphasis on works published during the second half of the 20th Century. Some of the topics of study and discussion will be: fiction and reality; fiction within fiction, pop culture; hybrid cultures; dictatorship, political and sexual repression, psychological narrative, exploitation, myth, empowerment of feminine and feminist narrative, narrative voices; the problematic heritage of the mestizo, detective fiction, and rhythm in narrative and polyphonic voices. Some authors and works to be studied include Manuel Puig (Boquitas pintadas), José Donoso (El jardín de al lado), Angeles Mastret (Arráncame la vida), Rodrigo Rey Rosas (Lo que soñó Sebastián), Alberto Fuguet (Mala onda), Carlos Fuentes (La muerte de Artemio Cruz) and Fernando Vallejo, (La Virgen de los sicarios).

SPAN 765 Contemporary Spanish American Poets

Beginning with Modernismo and ending with the most recent trends in Spanish American poetry, the course will cover different literary movements and cultural formations with an emphasis on issues of gender, race, nation and ideology. Students will read and discuss texts from Darío, Martí, Huidoro, Storni, Guillén and others, and look critically at questions surrounding the formation of a national / regional cannon and the representation of these authors in it’s ever changing condition. Main book: Antología de la poesía Hispanoamericana. Editor Julio Ortega. Mexico: Siglo XXI, 1987.

SPAN 767 Spanish-American Testimonial Literature

In-depth study of selected contemporary testimonial accounts, internationally hailed as classics in the genre, from different Spanish American countries, as well as an in-depth study of two films that fall in the same category of being the voice of the voiceless. Texts covered will include Un día en la vida (Manlio Argueta), Biografía de un cimarrón (Miguel Barnet), Me llamo Rigoberta Menchu y así me nació la conciencia (Elizabeth Burgos), Juan Pérez Jolote (Ricardo Pozas), Tejas verdes. Diario de un campo de concentración en Chile (Hernán Valdés), "Si me permiten hablar..." Testimonio de Domitila (Moema Viezzer), and the films Verónico Cruz and Chile, Obstinate Memory.

SPAN 769 Hispanic Women Writers

In-depth study on women authors’ works from Spain and Spanish America--poets, narrators, playwrights, essayists--writing during the period of the Spanish Civil War and later during the Cold War. This course will study the literary strategies used by women writers to express and denounce, in a highly coded discourse, the horror of violence, human right abuses, the disintegration of family and nation, and the diverse role of women, within family and society, as portrayed in the texts. Selected authors such as Gabriela Mistral, Carmen Martín Gaite, Ana María Matute, Rosa Montero, Lidia Falcón, Gioconda Belli, Claribel Alegría, and others will be some of the authors studied in this course.

SPAN 776 The Teaching of Foreign Language in College

This three-credit course will focus on the basic principles of foreign language teaching in college combined with practical demonstrations and is required of all graduate teaching assistants.

SPAN 777 Supervised Instruction in Teaching Foreign Language in College

This one-credit course will focus on the basic principles of foreign language teaching in college combined with practical teaching in college and is required of all graduate teaching assistants having completed their first semester in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures-Spanish Program.

SPAN 780 The Spanish American Essay

In-depth study of the Spanish American Essay from its origins to present time. The anthology covers five centuries and it is extensive. However, course will focus on two main subjects of study. First, the identity of Spanish America manifested through the history of the essay as a genre in the continent, as illustrated by diverse authors from different countries. Second, the reflection on writing by the essayists in connection to their specific historical circumstances, and their conscious dialogue with other writers, past and present, linking the regional to the universal--East/West; North/South--, both in techniques as well as in their approaches to the main themes they explore.