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College of Arts & Sciences
Film and Media Studies Program


Fall 2015 Courses

A complete list of Film and Media Studies course offerings for Fall 2015 can also be viewed on USC's Master Schedule. 

 

FILM 110 Media Culture

Professor Laura Kissel
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 PM - 5:40 PM
Screening: Tuesday  6 - 8 PM

An introduction to the study of media forms: photography, advertising, film, television, and new media. Students learn how to analyze, comprehend, and contextualize our image-saturated media culture; acquire an analytical/theoretical vocabulary for images; and gain an understanding of key concepts in and theories of visual media. The course also offers students the chance to apply their newfound skill set for media analysis to the art of media production of both sound and image.

 

FILM 240.001 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 10:05 - 11:20 AM
Screening: Tuesday  4:25 - 6:25 PM

Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguments about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.

 

FILM 240 H01 Introduction to Film and Media Studies  HONORS SECTION

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 3:55 - 5:10 PM
Screening: Mondays 5:30 - 7:30 PM 

Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguements about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.

 

FILM 240.E01 Introduction to Film and Media Studies

Professor  Evren Ozselcuk
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 6:00-7:15PM
Screening: Thursdays 7:35-9:35PM

Introduction to the critical study of film and media. Students will closely analyze moving images and develop written arguements about film and media. This course is required for the major and minor in Film and Media Studies.

 

FILM 300 Film and Media History

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Thursdays 6 - 8 PM

Surveys the development of cinema and related media from the 1820s to the present, Attention to the relations among key technological, cultural, and industrial changes, their causes, and consequences.

 

FILM 510.001  History of Experimental Film

Professor Susan Felleman
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 4:25 - 6:40 PM  (includes screening time)
cross listed with ARTH 569 and MART 592

From almost the beginning of cinema, there has been a parallel history: that of film art created by painters and sculptors, poets and critics, composers, experimentalists, philosophers, and others who have seen and explored possibilities other than the dominant (illusionistic narrative) in the medium of film. This course surveys some of the most important currents in that history, including cubist and other avant-garde practices of the 1920s; Impressionist, Expressionist, Dada and Surrealist cinemas; psychodramas, cameraless films, experiments in animation and collage, neo-Dada, pop, Structuralist film, and more.
 

FILM 511-001  Introduction to Game Studies

Professor Heidi Rae Cooley
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 10:05 - 11:20
Screening: Wednesdays 5:30 - 7:30 PM 
cross listed with MART 591.001

Invites students to think critically about games and game-play. Prepares students to approach games as historical and cultural objects. Helps students to understand how games and gameplay function socially to shape how people think about themselves, others, and the world around them.

 

FILM 511-002  Stardom, Celebrity, and Performance

Professor Kelly Wolf
Class: Monday and Wednesday 6 - 7:15 PM
Screening: Wednesday 7:30 - 9:30 PM
cross listed with MART 591.002

This course will explore the forms and functions of stardom and celebrity as a phenomenon of both production and consumption that operates both onscreen and off. We will be looking at the manner in which a variety of performers from film, television, and new media can be seen not only as highly skilled workers operating within specialized fields but also as cultural icons channeling viewer identification and forms of fandom. The course will also trace the roles that industry economics, technological development, and socio-cultural change have played in the emergence of individual performers, various acting and training methodologies, modes of studio promotion, and patterns of exhibition. Students will learn to recognize the specificities that characterize types of stardom and celebrity operating across multiple media forms and through different performance strategies.

 

FILM 566.001  Mediating Ferguson USA: 1915-2015

Professor Susan Courtney
Class: Tuesday and Thursday 1:15 - 2:30 PM
Screening: Tuesday 6:30 - 8:30 PM 

cross listed with ENGL 566-001

This course considers race, justice, and popular U.S. film and media in the 20th and 21st centuries. But it is a history for the present. We’ll begin with the recent national conversation about incidents in which white law enforcement officers have killed unarmed African American men and boys: Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, Kejieme Powell and others. First, we’ll study media related to these cases--from viral cell phone videos to Fruitvale Station (2013)--to develop key questions for the course. With those in mind, and drawing upon scholarship on media formations of race and related forms of identity and power (e.g., gender, sexuality, social class), we’ll then consider what the history of race and justice at the movies and on TV--from D.W. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation (1915)to HBO’s The Wire (2002-08)--might have to teach us about where we are now, how we got here, and strategies for moving forward. 

 

FILM 566.002  Superheroes Across Media

Professor Mark Minett
Class: Monday and Wednesday 2:20 - 3:35 PM
Screening: Mondays 7:30 - 9:30 PM 
cross listed with ENGL 566-002

Traces the aesthetic, cultural, technological, and industrial history of the superhero genre and superhero storytelling in comics, television, film, radio, and new media. Primary focus is placed on examining the transmedia franchising and (re)iteration of iconic “comic book superheroes” such as Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Avengers. 

 

FILM 710  Media/Archives

Professor Mark Cooper
Class: Wednesday 2:20 - 4:50 PM

cross listed with ENGL 765 and HIST 700

This class explores the role of the archives in determining how media (past, present, and future) are understood and practiced. We will ask how, to what ends, and for whom, is knowledge produced by means of archives? The course will emphasize the recent outpouring of scholarship on this question in Film and Media Studies but will also engage foundational arguments from philosophy, history, and library and information science. Regardless of discipline, graduate students will discover how the unique archival resources of the University’s Moving Image Research Collections can supplement their programs of research and/or creative activity. Students interested in “film” will be invited to reconsider what that term means. Students interested in metadata will be asked to revise the division of labor that creates it. Students interested in historical evidence will encounter powerfully supplemental new kinds of it. Student interest in ontology will touch archival things.