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Fall 2010 Class Schedule

Course Descriptions - Fall 2010 Semester

Course levels: Undergraduates may take 100- through 500-level courses. Graduate students will only receive credit for courses numbered at the 500-level and above. Some class materials may be available on-line.

100  |  200  |  300  |  400  |  500  |  700  |  800

GEOGRAPHY 103-001-- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
T TH 2:00p.m. –3:15p.m. CLS 005

Mr. Robert Greeley (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts.

GEOGRAPHY 103-002 - INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
M W 2:30p.m. - 3:45p.m.  CALLCOTT 011

Ms. Sarah Schwartz (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also shows how geographic knowledge is relevant to current issues of globalization.

GEOGRAPHY 103-003 - INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
M W  F 11:15a.m. –12:05p.m.  CALLCOTT 011

Mr. Alspan Risvanoglu (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also shows how geographic knowledge is relevant to current issues of globalization.

GEOGRAPHY E103-300 -- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
M W  5:30p.m. – 6:45p.m. CALLCOTT 101

Mr. James Byrum (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts.

GEOGRAPHY 104-001 -- INTRO TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
T TH 11:00a.m. – 12:15 p.m. CALLCOTT 201

Ms. Kirsten Hunt (7-5234)

Physical geography is an area of study that synthesizes and connects elements of our physical environment as they relate to human beings. GEOG 104 is an introductory level course that explores the processes and forms of Earth's surface system, including climate, hydrology, soils, biogeography, water resources, and landforms. The objective of this course is to provide a systematic introduction to physical geography, emphasizing the basic principles that explain the processes and forms of the atmosphere (including climates and meteorology), hydrosphere (including rivers and oceans), biosphere (with emphasis on the distribution and diversity of organisms), and the geosphere (with emphasis on the surface forms and processes).  Dominant themes of the course include the spatial distribution of basic physical, chemical, and biological processes, as well as the interactions of human societies with the natural systems that support them.

GEOGRAPHY 105-001 & 002 -- The Digital Earth
T 2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 003

TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. Lab I CALLCOTT 005
TH   12:30p.m. – 1:45p.m. Lab II  CALLCOTT 005

Mr. William Lynn Shirley (7-4590)

The Digital Earth is an introductory survey course about how the earth is represented in digital formats (e.g. maps) and how it can be viewed and analyzed:  from global positioning systems (GPS), aerial photography and remote sensing as means of capturing earth images, to geographic information systems (GIS) and cartographic visualization as means of analyzing and displaying spatial information.  Students will use GPS equipment, learn to create 3-D building representations and be exposed to leading edge trends in mapping technology – with examples from everyday life like web maps and iPhones.

A balance of lecture and hands-on computer lab exercises are used to introduce several different concepts and applications such as Google Earth, ArcGIS, SketchUp, ArcPAD and others.

Only basic Windows operating system experience is assumed.

 

GEOGRAPHY 121- 001 – LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
T TH 9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 011

Mr. Alpan Risvanoglu (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 121- 002 – LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
MWF  11:15a.m.- 12:05p.m. CALLCOTT 201

Ms. Natalie Jensen (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 201-001, 002, 003, 004 LANDFORM GEOGRAPHY
T TH 9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 201

Lab I: T 11:00a.m.-12:50 CALLCOTT 202
Lab II: T 2:00p.m.-3:50p.m.  CALLCOTT 202
Lab III: W 10:10a.m.-12:00p.m. CALLCOTT 202
Lab IV: W 12:20p.m.-2:10p.m. CALLCOTT 202


Dr. Jean T. Ellis (7-1593)

Landforms are physical features on the Earth’s surface that often define landscapes. This introductory lab sciences course will explore the diverse types and formation processes of landforms. This course will approach the study of landforms from a geographic perspective and will consider the influence and relationships between various spatial and temporal scales. Students will be introduced to climate, soils, and hydrology and the relationships to landform development and evolution. The power of water, wind, ice, and gravity will be examined in relation to landform creation, modification, and destruction.  Throughout the course, the impact of humans and environmental change on the Earth’s landforms, especially glacial, coastal, and riverine systems, will be considered. Course-related current events will be examined. Students will attend lectures where grading is based on three mid-terms. Ten laboratories meet throughout the semester. Labs complement topics discussed in lecture and emphasize hands-on activities. The laboratory portion of the course comprises 25% of the total course grade and considers laboratory activities, quizzes, and a small project. Students shall register for lecture (T TH 9:30-10:45 am) and one 110-minute laboratory session.

 

GEOGRAPHY 202-001 & 002 WEATHER AND CLIMATE

T  TH 9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 102
Lab I:  W 12:20 p.m.- 2:10 p.m.   CALLCOTT  004/005
Lab II: W 2:30 p.m. – 4:20 p.m. CALLCOTT  004/005

Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)

This course provides students with a general understanding of the processes which influence weather and climate patterns on the earth.  It first examines the sources of energy driving atmospheric processes, the importance of atmospheric moisture, and the forces creating the winds.  The second part of the course focuses on storm systems, including mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather.  The last third of the class is devoted to the study of climate, climate variability and change, and the impact of such change on human activity.  The laboratory sections will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics.  The final grade will be based on three lecture exams, three lab exams, take-home exercises, a weather journal, and regular lecture and lab quizzes.

 *4 credit hour course, includes a 2 hour laboratory each week

 

GEOGRAPHY 210-001 PEOPLES, PLACES and ENVIRONMENTS
T TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 201

Dr. Edward Carr (7-1854)

This course provides a thematic introduction to contemporary human geography, a broad geographic subfield directly concerned with human beings and their interaction with their natural and cultural environment.  The course explores themes of urbanization, population growth, rural to urban and international migrations, international development, territorial sovereignties, statehood and terrorism, and the cultural geographies of place and landscapes, just to name a few, to illustrate how these different concerns are linked through geographic perspectives and methods of investigation.

 

GEOGRAPHY 223-001 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA/LASP 331
M W 2:30p.m. -3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 101

Mr. James Byrum (7-6380)

An introduction to the physical and human geography of Latin America. Lectures are structured in 5 major areas: (i) physical geography (different ecosystems,  climate, vegetation, and land patterns), (ii) historical geography (the impact that colonization had on indigenous peoples, on the social and political organization of the region, and on the behavioral aspects of its individuals), (iii) population geography (racial and ethnic composition; population growth and demographic transition; patterns of mortality, fertility and migration; settlement patterns; religious practices; and urbanization), (iv) economic geography (patterns of economic activity, and the potential influences of international economic cycles and organizations), and (v) political geography (political changes, including national governments and international policies).

 

GEOGRAPHY 225-001 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE
T TH  12:30p.m. – 1:45p.m. CALLCOTT 201

Dr. Caroline Nagel (7-4970)

This class will explore historical and contemporary geographies of Europe.  We will focus on human processes, but will also consider human-environment interactions and the role of physical geography in shaping industrial and urban development.  Topics will include: historical patterns agricultural production; the emergence of cities; industrialization; the formation of the European nation-state system; Cold War geographies; urban redevelopment; housing and transportation; immigration and ethnic minorities; the European Union; and energy and environmental policies.

 

GEOGRAPHY 311-001 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
T TH 11:00a.m.– 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT 101

Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

How does where you live influence who you are? How do our understandings of the world – our beliefs, values, dreams, and memories – influence the environments of everyday life? What can we learn about cultural identity and belonging by examining the landscapes and places we think are important to who we are? How does society reinforce or challenge issues such as social, economic, or political inequality through planning and organizing physical and social space? This course will introduce students to spatial ways of thinking about culture, including the interrelationships between power, meanings and values, ways of life, and the material things we create and use in ordinary life. By the end of this course students will be able to: define and use the concepts of space, place, and landscape to examine current social and cultural issues; demonstrate a geographic understanding of how identity and inequality are produced in society; and use spatial concepts and geographic methodologies to research a local cultural or social topic.

 

GEOGRAPHY 330-001 THE GEOGRAPHY OF DISASTERS
M W 2:30p.m. – 3:45 p.m. CALLCOTT 201

                                                            Mr. Eric Tate (7-5234)

 

The study of disasters, their triggering mechanisms (natural, human, technological), their spatial distributions from local to global scales, and associated human responses.

 

GEOG 337-001 PSYCHOGEOGRAPHY
10:10a.m.-11:00a.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Sarah Battersby (7-5729)

This course examines aspects of human-geography relationships.  Emphasis is placed on spatial decision making, place preference, cognitive mapping, and other geographical and spatial information.  Through lecture, discussion, reading, and practical lab exercises you will learn about numerous topics and theories relevant for understanding the psychology of geography – how we interact with geographic space, learn about new environments, and, in general, acquire and use spatial information.

 

GEOGRAPHY 341-001 CARTOGRAPHY
M W 12:20p.m. – 1:10p.m. CALLCOTT 003

LAB: F 12:20p.m. – 1:10p.m. CALLCOTT 005

Dr. Sarah Battersby  (7-5729)

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of map design. It provides the student with an understanding of the most appropriate ways of symbolizing geographic data on maps. Students develop cartographic skills through the completion of map projects using the latest Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. Students learn how to design effective and attractive maps through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and creating their own maps. In the latter half of the course, each student completes a final mapping project, based on a topic he or she selects.

 

GEOGRAPHY 343-001 HUMAN IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT
M W  2:30p.m. -3:45  CALLCOTT 202

Dr. Kirstin Dow (7-2482)

Human actions are transforming the Earth.  To understand environmental change processes today requires examining the interactions between humans, our social systems, and the biochemical processes that generate particular patterns of environmental damage across the globe - alterations in the global climate, degradation of rich coastal systems, heavy losses of tropical biodiversity,  desertification of marginal arid lands, and concentrations of municipal and industrial wastes associated with increasing urbanization. The class addresses these impacts and strategies for reducing or responding to them.  Evaluation in the course will be based upon a series of exams and short papers/assignments.

 

GEOGRAPHY 345-001 INTERPRETATION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS
T  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 005

Staff (7-5234)

This course introduces the fundamental principles of aerial photography including the history, radiant energy, filtration, properties of the photographic image, aerial photography data collection, airphoto geometry, photogrammetric measurement,  and interpretation of aerial photographs.  Emphasis is placed on practical photo-interpretation training in an effort to make the student a competent user of aerial photographs for a variety of geographic and multidisciplinary applications.

Evaluation is based on lab exercises, a mid-term, and a final exam.

 

GEOGRAPHY 347-001 WATER AS A RESOURCE
T TH 11:00a.m. – 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Allan James (7-6117)

This is a survey course on basic concepts and tools of water resources management.  It begins  with the hydrologic cycle and develops a fundamental understanding of water systems, water  quality, and water-related hazards.  It then covers historical and contemporary water uses for  municipal, agricultural, industrial, and power-generation purposes, as well as global  distributions of supply and demand.  Institutional controls on water use in the United States  will be emphasized, including the economics of water, water rights law, and legislative  controls such as the Clean Water Act and the National Environmental Policy Act.   Grades  will be based on two exams (70%), exercises (20%), attendance (5%), and participation in a  one-day field excursion (5%).


GEOGRAPHY 363-001 & 002-GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MW 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CALLCOTT 201

Lab I: F 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CALLCOTT 005
Lab II: F 11:15a.m. – 12:05p.m. CALLCOTT 005

Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976)

Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.  Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with an emphasis on modeling the Earth and abstracting geographical data, collection of geographical data using modern techniques such as GPS, and analysing patterns and spatial relationships. 

Practical experience with GIS is provided during the lab exercises using a state-of-the-art GI System. Students are expected to be comfortable with the Microsoft windows interface.

 

GEOGRAPHY 363-003 - GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T TH 3:30p.m. – 4:45p.m.  CALLCOTT 005

Mr. Ian Kramer (7-5234)

Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.

Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with emphasis on spatial data, manipulation and analysis, and applications.  Practical experience with GIS is provided through hands-on computer and manual exercises.  Students are expected to be familiar with the Microsoft windows interface.

 

GEOG 365-001 HURRICANES AND TROPICAL CLIMATOLOGY
M W 2:30p.m. – 3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Cary Mock (7-1211)

The purpose of the course is to present the basic concepts and processes as they relate to tropical climatology and hurricanes.  It covers weather basics at large geographic scales encompassing climate processes that relate to the entire tropics, and then progressing to smaller regional spatial scales such as those dealing with monsoon climates, followed by tropical climate forcings such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation.  Tropical cyclones and hurricane topics include the structure and characteristics, followed by hurricane forecasting techniques and then various aspects of hurricane climatology.  Tropical weather forecast discussions, following a format routinely used by the National Hurricane Center and utilizing real-time weather information, will reinforce important concepts learned in lecture. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 399 -- INDEPENDENT STUDY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127

GEOGRAPHY 495-001 SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHY
T  3:30p.m. – 6:00p.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Jean Ellis (7-1593)

This is a capstone course for undergraduate geography majors, is a requirement for graduation, and is taught only during fall semesters.  Students will learn professional development skills, including resume preparation. Post-undergraduate job opportunities and graduate school will be discussed. Pending availability, geography alumni will visit the class to share their experiences in the workforce. A significant portion of the course grade comprises a group-based research activity, and the associated papers and presentations, designed to integrate geographic knowledge and apply it to real-world problems.

 

GEOGRAPHY 498 -- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234) 
CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 499 -- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)        
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127

GEOG RAPHY 512-001 MIGRATION AND GLOBALIZATION
T TH 9:30a.m.-10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 101

Dr. Caroline Nagel (7-4970)

Migration has been one of the most significant forces shaping the political, economic and social landscapes of the contemporary world system.  Today, no region or country is isolated from the changes wrought by population movement. The increasing scale and diversity of migration can be linked to changing patterns of development associated with ‘globalization’.  But migration is not simply an outcome of globalization; instead migration actively creates ‘the global’ by forging expansive networks of people, commodities, cultures, and political action.  In this course, we will explore historical and contemporary migration flows and the processes driving these flows, the impacts of migration on places of origin and destinations, and the multiple linkages that exist between migrants and their places of origin.     We will also give special attention to border politics, citizenship and integration policies, gender and migration, and new urban spaces of ‘superdiversity’.  

 

GEOGRAPHY 525-001 GEOGRAPHY ANALYSIS TRANSPORTATION
T TH 12:30p.m.-1:45p.m. CALLCOTT 112

Dr. Christopher Upchurch (7-5867)

Analysis of transportation systems and the application of geographic tools to transportation planning. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 530-001 ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS
M W  8:40a.m. – 9:55a.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Susan Cutter (7-1590)

This course investigates the causes and impacts of environmental hazards on society.  Specifically, the course focuses on the relationship between society and nature, especially how people and societies respond to hazardous geologic, atmospheric, hydrologic, and technological events.  In addition to briefly reviewing the physical/technological dynamics of hazards, we will focus most of our attention on hazards mitigation and recovery from disasters.

The major goals of the course are to 1) examine the causes and consequences of hazards on society over time and space; 2) to assess various responses to disasters (relief, recovery, reconstruction, mitigation) by individuals and society; 3) understand the evolution of and current status of hazards policy; and 4) identify gaps in knowledge and policy in the hazards area.  The pre-requisites for the course are GEOG 330 The Geography of Disasters or its equivalent.

 

GEOGRAPHY 531-001 QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN GEOGRAPHIC RESEARCH
 MW 4:00p.m.-5:15p.m.

Dr. Cary Mock  (7-1211)

This course will deal with the nature of geographical data sets, and statistical measures and models commonly used by geographers to describe spatial variations and patterns, distributions, and relationships among geographical data. Each student will be given opportunities to apply these techniques to geographical datasets, with practice involving use of computer-based exercises and written examinations. The course assumes knowledge of basic algebra.  The course does not focus on the derivation of equations, but rather focuses on applications.

 

GEOGRAPHY 551-001 PRINCIPLES OF REMOTE SENSING
T 11:00a.m. – 1:30p.m. CALLCOTT 005

Dr. John Jensen (7-5790)

Objectives: The goal of this course is to introduce  students to the fundamental concepts of remote sensing of the environment using airborne and satellite remote sensing systems. Remote sensing image analysis is primarily based on analog, visual image processing.

Method of Presentation: First, the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with earth surface materials is explored. Then, various types of remote sensor systems are introduced so that the user can match the most appropriate sensor system with the application. The second half of the course emphasizes applications of remote sensing to earth resource investigations, including: remote sensing of vegetation, water, urban/suburban infrastructure, and soils and rocks. 

Method of Evaluation: Grades are based on exercises (30%), a mid-term (30%), and a final exam (40%).

Required Text: Jensen, J. R., 2007, Remote Sensing of the Environment, 2nd Edition, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc., 550 p.

 

GEOGRAPHY 561-001 GEOGRAPHY FOR TEACHERS
MW 11:15a.m.-12:30p.m. CALLCOTT 102

Dr. Jerry Mitchell (7-2986)

Basic concepts and content related physical, cultural, and economic characteristics of place, human-environment interaction, migration, regions, and the national geography standards

 

GEOGRAPHY 563-001 & 002 ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T  9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m.   CALLCOTT 003

 Lab I - TH  9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m.  CALLCOTT 005
Lab II TH 11:00p.m. – 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT 005

Dr. Christopher Upchurch (7-5867)

This course covers the technical and conceptual bases of Geographic Information Systems.  This includes how GIS is used to perform spatial analysis, analysis of networks, incorporation of remote sensing data, and three-dimensional surfaces.

An integral part of this course is the extensive experience students gain using an operational geographic information system.  This experience allows the exploration of theoretical topics presented as well as examination and formulation of real-world applications areas as diverse as real estate, crime analysis, environmental protection, public health, and planning.

 

GEOGRAPHY 564-001 GIS BASED MODELING
MW 1:25p.m. – 2:15p.m. CALLCOTT 003

Lab: F 1:25p.m. – 2:15p.m. CALLCOTT 005

Dr. Michael Hodgson – (7-8976)

Purpose of Course

The purpose of the course is to present geographical and temporal modeling concepts using GIS modeling languages and techniques.  Practical laboratory experience with state-of-the-art software and hardware will be used.  Material covered will include the cartographic modeling language concepts by Tomlin, deterministic and statistical models, and coupled/embedded approaches to modeling.  By the end of the course, students should be able to make informed decisions about the appropriate conceptual model, scale of analysis, and GIS implementation strategy for geographical modeling problems.  Students will also be able to implement a variety of embedded models using ArcGIS and either Visual Basic Applications (VBA) or C#.

Prerequisites.   Students entering this course should have the equivalent of GEOG 563 and some experience with Visual Basic or C#/Java.

 Course Presentation.   Material will be presented through lectures (Monday and Wednesday class meetings) and hands on work in the computing laboratory (generally on Fridays).  The geographic concepts are first presented in the context of one or more applications.  An implementation solution to the concept is next presented.  Finally, students conduct an extension of this concept and implementation using a GISystem.

 

GEOGRAPHY 570-001 GEOGRAPHY PUBLIC LAND AND WATER POLICY
T  9:30a.m. -12:00p.m. CALLCOTT 112

Dr. John Kupfer (7-6739)

Geography of public land, water, and related public trust resources (wildlife, timber, minerals, fuels, recreation, wetlands, coastal zones, wilderness); historical geography of policy; spatial aspects of current research and management.

 

GEOGRAPHY 571-001 MICROCLIMATOLOGY
MW 2:30p.m.-4:30p.m. CALLCOTT 112

Dr. April Hiscox (7-5234)

This course examines the interactions between the earth’s surface and the lower atmosphere. Microclimatology involves understanding the mean states and permanent repeated phenomena in the atmosphere on the micrometeorological scale. The focus on the course is the description of transport processes of energy and mass in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system.  Processes discussed with include radiation, turbulence, soil heat fluxes, momentum transfer, latent and sensible heat fluxes, moisture fluxes and evaporation.  After completion of this course, students will understand the scientific theory governing land-atmosphere interactions, as well as the role of models and fieldwork in enhancing the current understanding. Student will work with microclimatic data and instrumentation.

 

GEOGRAPHY 595-001 -- INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY
(*A Signed Internship Contract Required by the Instructor before Enrolling)
T B A
Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976)
CALLCOTT 326

The internship in geography helps students acquire valuable "on the job" experience and develop marketable job skills as well as learn about employment opportunities and requirements.  Students serve as interns with cooperating government agencies, or commercial and nonprofit businesses.  A special effort is made to assign each intern to a position compatible with his/her interests, abilities, and career aspirations.  The course is graded on a pass/not pass basis.  Grades are determined by the Internship Director in consultation with supervisory personnel in cooperating agencies.  Grades are based on the performance of internship duties and the preparation of an internship summary report.

 

GEOGRAPHY 705 -- DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr.Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127


Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.


GEOGRAPHY 706 -- SELECTED TOPICS IN CART/RS
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127


Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.

 

Geography 747-001 SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
TH  1:00p.m.-3:30p.m. CALLCOTT 228

Dr. Allan James (7-6117)

Lab and Field Methods in Geomorphology and Hydrology.  This seminar will provide students with field and laboratory experience in hydrology, water quality, sedimentology, soils, and geomorphology.  It will have three components:  (1) round-table discussions to go over readings about field and lab methods; (2) outdoor field excursions to examine, measure, survey, and sample soils, streams, sediment, slopes, etc.; (3) indoor laboratory exercises to process samples and learn lab techniques.  Readings will preceed field and lab sessions to provide instruction and equipment orientations.  Field work at sites near campus will include basic surveying (total station, GPS, etc.), sediment sampling (bulk density, coring, etc.), water quality sampling, and discharge and sediment flux measurements.  A stream gauge will be established and calibrated with a stage-discharge curve and sediment-rating curve.  This will involve installing a stage sensor, digital data logger, and ISCO automated water sampler, measuring streamflow, sampling total solids for a range of discharge events, and a topographic survey of the channel.  A weekend field trip to the tri-state area (NC, GA, SC) with two nights of camping at Standing Indian Park will visit the Coweeta Hydrology lab and Tallulah Falls.  Lab work will include GISci computer processing of field survey map data and processing of sediment and water quality data in the biogeomorphology lab.  Previous lab or field experience is not required but some experience in physical geography, geology, surveying, or hydrology, and enthusiasm for learning how to measure, analyze, and map water and earth materials outdoors and in the lab are important.  Grades will be determined by a series of exercises, projects, and written assignments.

For questions, please contact the instructor, Dr. Allan James, by phone (777-6117) or email (ajames@sc.edu)

 

GEOGRAPHY 799 -- THESIS PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 805 -- DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION PROCESSING

(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics in geographical information processing processing to be individually supervised by graduate faculty.

 

GEOGRAPHY 810-001 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Readings In Contemporary Human Geography
“SPACE, PLACE, LANDSCAPE, AND SCALE: UNDERSTANDING THE SPATIAL TURN”W 2:00p.m.-4:30p.m. CALLCOTT 228

Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

Course Description:

While concepts such as “space”, “place”, “landscape”, and “scale” are core ideas in geography, spatial concepts also shape research approaches and questions in other disciplines, in the context of a recent “spatial turn”. This course surveys chosen topics at the research frontier in human geography with an eye to introducing and interrogating these foundational concepts. This seminar is designed to provide students (in geography and in other disciplines) with a practical and theoretical understanding of these concepts and the ways in which they connect geography to areas more broadly in the social sciences and humanities. Human geography is a diverse field; selected research to be discussed in this seminar may include recent studies of:

  • human movement across space

migration; geopolitics; global and local questions of citizenship; transnationalism

  • human/environment relationships

role of cultural constructions of nature and the attachment to place in environmental preservation; political and economic ideologies and cultural values in processes of local and international development

  • human experiences in place

identity politics constructed and experienced in space; power dynamics of heritage and memory in place; imagined and experienced belonging and exclusion in social space

  • people and place as interdependent, through globalization

the role of territory or space in state or imperial power; the importance of locality to the global cultural economy; the cultural politics of global values in particular places; the role and meaning of the city in a globalized world

Because human geographic research methodologies are diverse, the research we will examine will employ a range of methods, including: quantitative or qualitative social science approaches; the study of visual, auditory, or electronic media; and the investigation of historical archival material, maps, oral histories, or fictional narratives. In this course, students will accomplish the following learning objectives: demonstrate familiarity with key research in contemporary human geography; demonstrate knowledge of current research trends in “the spatial turn” in the social sciences and humanities; understand, theorize and employ critical geographic spatial concepts in research. The final grade for this reading-intensive course will be based on assessments of student participation in seminar discussion, short response papers, and a final project in which theories examined in the course are applied in the student’s own research.

           

GEOGRAPHY 851-001 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN REMOTE SENSING
T  2:00p.m. – 4:30p.m. CALLCOTT 228

Dr. John Jensen (7-5790)

Objectives: The course will extent the discussion of the concepts introduced in 1) Geography 551: Principles of Remote Sensing, and 2) Geography 751: Digital Techniques of Remote Sensing.  The course will delve more deeply into remote sensing research topics that are of particular interest to the graduate student class participants.

Method of Presentation: Each Tuesday from 2:00 p.m. until approximately 4:30 p.m. the class will meet in the Department of Geography Seminar Room.  Readings will be distributed.  Students will be expected to read the material and be prepared to discuss specific articles the following week.  The graduate students will take the lead in discussing certain articles and contribute in the discussion of other articles.

Method of Evaluation: Weekly seminar participation will be evaluated (70%).  A written term paper based on an aspect of the course content is required (20%) and must be presented orally (10%).  In some cases, the term paper may represent the first draft of either a masters thesis or a doctoral dissertation proposal.

Required Text: Jensen, J. R., 2005, Introductory Digital Image Processing: A Remote Sensing Perspective, 3rd Edition, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc., 552 p.

Supplementary Readings: Journal articles from Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing, IEEE Transaction on remote Sensing, Remote Sensing of the environment, International Journal of Remote Sensing, Manual of remote Sensing, International Journal of Geographic Information Systems, and Selected texts on remote sensing of the environment.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of remote sensing of the environment. First, the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with earth surface materials is explored. Then, various types of remote sensor systems are introduced so that the user can match the most appropriate sensor system with the application. The latter part of the course emphasizes applications of remote sensing to earth resource investigations, including: remote sensing of vegetation, water, urban/suburban infrastructure, and soils and rocks.  Evaluation is based on lab exercises (30%), a mid-term (30%), and a final exam (40%).

 

GEOGRAPHY 899 – DISSERTATION PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)  T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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