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Spring 2010 Class Schedule

Course Descriptions - Spring 2010 Semester

Course levels: Undergraduates may take 100- through 500-level courses. Graduate students will only receive credit for courses numbered at the 500-level and above. Some class materials may be available on-line.

100  |  200  |  300  |  400  |  500  |  700  |  800

GEOGRAPHY 103-001-- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
 MW  2:30p.m. – 3:45 CALLCOTT 011
Ms. Natalie Jensen (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts

GEOGRAPHY 103-002 -- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
MWF  12:20p.m. – 1:10p.m.  CALLCOTT 201
Ms. Sarah Schwartz (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also shows how geographic knowledge is relevant to current issues of globalization.

GEOGRAPHY 103-003-- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
T TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 201
Mr. Alpan Risvanoglu  (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also shows how geographic knowledge is relevant to current issues of globalization.

GEOGRAPHY E103-300 -- INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
MW 5:30 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. CALLCOTT 201
Mr. James Byrum   (7-6380)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts.

GEOGRAPHY 104-001 -- INTRO TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
T TH 11:00am – 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT  201
Ms. Kimberly Meitzen (7-5234)

Physical geography is an area of study that synthesizes and connects elements of our physical environment as they relate to human beings. GEOG 104 is an introductory level course that explores the processes and forms of Earth's surface system, including climate, hydrology, soils, biogeography, water resources, and landforms. The objective of this course is to provide a systematic introduction to physical geography, emphasizing the basic principles that explain the processes and forms of the atmosphere (including climates and meteorology), hydrosphere (including rivers and oceans), biosphere (with emphasis on the distribution and diversity of organisms), and the geosphere (with emphasis on the surface forms and processes).  Dominant themes of the course include the spatial distribution of basic physical, chemical, and biological processes, as well as the interactions of human societies with the natural systems that support them.

GEOGRAPHY 105-001 & 002 -- THE DIGITAL EARTH
         T 2:00 p.m. -3:15 p.m. CALLCOTT 003
Lab I:  TH 2:00 p.m.- 3:15 p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Lab II:  TH  12:30p.m. – 1:45p.m.CALLCOTT 005
Mr. Lynn Shirley (7-4590)
 

The Digital Earth is an introductory survey course about how the earth is represented in digital formats (e.g. maps) and how it can be viewed and analyzed:  from global positioning systems (GPS), aerial photography and remote sensing as means of capturing earth images, to geographic information systems (GIS) and cartographic visualization as means of analyzing and displaying spatial information.  Students will use GPS equipment, learn to create 3-D building representations and be exposed to leading edge trends in mapping technology – with examples from everyday life like web maps and iPhones.

A balance of lecture and hands-on computer lab exercises are used to introduce several different concepts and applications such as Google Earth, ArcGIS, SketchUp, ArcPAD and others.  Only basic Windows operating system experience is assumed.

GEOGRAPHY 121- 001 – LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
T TH 11:00a.m. - 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT 011
Mr. Michael Finewood   (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world. 

GEOGRAPHY 121- 002 – LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
MWF 11:15a.m. – 12:05p.m. CALLCOTT 201
Ms. Mary Thompson  (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world. 

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GEOGRAPHY 201-001, 002, 003, 004 LANDFORM  GEOGRAPHY
9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 201
Dr. Jean T. Ellis (7-1593)
Lab I:  W 10:10a.m. – 12:00p.m. CALLCOTT 202
Lab II:  W 12:20p.m. – 2:10p.m. CALLCOTT 202
Lab III: TH 11:00a.m. – 12:50p.m. CALLCOTT 202
Lab IV: TH 2:00p.m. – 3:50p.m. CALLCOTT 202

Landforms are physical features on the Earth’s surface that often define landscapes. This introductory course will explore the diverse types and formation processes of landforms. This course will approach the study of landforms from a geographic perspective and will consider the influence and relationship between time and landform location. Students will learn about soils and hydrology. The power of water, wind, ice, and gravity will be examined in relation to landform creation, modification, and destruction.  Throughout the course, the impact of humans and environmental change on the Earth’s landforms, especially glacial, coastal, and riverine systems, will be considered. Students will attend lectures where grading is based on two mid-terms, a final exam, and a project where students describe photographs. Students must also register for a 110-minute laboratory session. In laboratory, students will apply their lecture-learned knowledge by conducting hands-on experiments. Weekly laboratory exercises are graded.

GEOGRAPHY 202-001 & 002 WEATHER AND CLIMATE
T TH 9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m. CALLCOTT 102

Lab I:  W 12:20 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.   CALLCOTT  004
Lab I:  W 12:20 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.   CALLCOTT  005
Lab II: W 2:30p.m. - 4:20 p.m. – 4:20 p.m. CALLCOTT 004
Lab II: W 3:45p.m. – 4:20 p.m. CALLCOTT  005
              Dr. Greg Carbone (7-0682)

This course provides students with a general understanding of the processes which influence weather and climate patterns on the earth.  It first examines the sources of energy driving atmospheric processes, the importance of atmospheric moisture, and the forces creating the winds.  The second part of the course focuses on storm systems, including mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather.  The last third of the class is devoted to the study of climate, climate variability and change, and the impact of such change on human activity.  The laboratory sections will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics.  The final grade will be based on three lecture exams, three lab exams, take-home exercises, a weather journal, and regular lecture and lab quizzes.  *4 credit hour course, includes a 2 hour laboratory each week.


GEOGRAPHY 202-501 WEATHER AND CLIMATE
(HONORS)

T TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 112
Lab: TH 2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 004
Lab: TH 3:30p.m. – 5:15p.m. CALLCOTT 005
        Dr. Greg Carbone (7-0682)

This course provides students with a general understanding of the processes which influence weather and climate patterns on the earth.  It first examines the sources of energy driving atmospheric processes, the importance of atmospheric moisture, and the forces creating the winds.  The second part of the course focuses on storm systems, including mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather.  The last third of the class is devoted to the study of climate, climate variability and change, and the impact of such change on human activity.  The laboratory sections will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics.  The final grade will be based on three lecture exams, three lab exams, take-home exercises, a weather journal, and regular lecture and lab quizzes.  *4 credit hour course, includes a 2 hour laboratory each week.

GEOGRAPHY 210-001 PEOPLES, PLACES and ENVIRONMENTS
M W 2:30p.m. – 3:45p.m.  CALLCOTT 201
Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

This course provides a thematic introduction to contemporary human geography, a broad geographic subfield directly concerned with human beings and their interaction with their natural and cultural environment.  The course explores themes of urbanization, population growth, rural to urban and international migrations, international development, territorial sovereignties, statehood and terrorism, and the cultural geographies of place and landscapes, just to name a few, to illustrate how these different concerns are linked through geographic perspectives and methods of investigation.

GEOGRAPHY 221-001 GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
MWF 9:05a.m. -9:55a.m. CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Jerry T. Mitchell (7-2986)

Geography of South Carolina.   An intensive regional analysis of South Carolina. Selected phenomena such as urbanization, industrialization, land use, the physical environment, and their interrelationships.

GEOGRAPHY 223-001 GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA/LASP 331
MW  2:30p.m.  – 3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 101
Mr. James Byrum (7-6380)

An introduction to the physical and human geography of Latin America. Lectures are structured in 5 major areas: (i) physical geography (different ecosystems,  climate, vegetation, and land patterns), (ii) historical geography (the impact that colonization had on indigenous peoples, on the social and political organization of the region, and on the behavioral aspects of its individuals), (iii) population geography (racial and ethnic composition; population growth and demographic transition; patterns of mortality, fertility and migration; settlement patterns; religious practices; and urbanization), (iv) economic geography (patterns of economic activity, and the potential influences of international economic cycles and organizations), and (v) political geography (political changes, including national governments and international policies).

GEOGRAPHY 226-001 GEOGRAPHY OF THE MIDDLE EAST
MW  4:00p.m. - 5:15p.m. CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

This course approaches the region of the Middle East from a human geography perspective and does not attempt to cover the entire region. Rather, students in this course will use geographic concepts to: 1) develop an understanding of historic and contemporary cultures and environments in the Middle East and; 2) examine current topics and debates in the Middle East as local expressions of geographic connections to the region and to global processes.  The course begins with a historical geographic overview of the region and then focuses on specific country examples and special topics in social, cultural, economic, and political geography.  Among the topics to be covered are: expansion of Islam, Islamic cities, and medieval Islamic geography; colonial and national boundaries; urbanization and poverty; environmental resources in culture and politics; gender, veiling, and Islamic feminism; and current debates in society and culture.

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GEOGRAPHY 312-001 GEOGRAPHY AND GLOBAL GEOPOLITICS
T TH  9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m.  CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Caroline Nagel  (7-4970)

Geopolitics traditionally refers to relationships between nation-states and the actions through which nation-states maximize their control and influence over resources, territorial borders, and potential adversaries.  The history of the modern world is replete with examples of geopolitical maneuverings, from Hitler’s Lebensraum to American Cold War ‘containment’ strategies to Pakistan’s sponsorship of efforts to destabilize Kashmir.  This course takes a critical approach to geopolitics by considering the geographical thinking that underlies countries’ foreign policy decisions.  How have world powers and regional power viewed the world and their place in it?  How have they put particular views of the world into practice through military action, foreign aid, diplomacy, and territorial expansionism?  We will also consider how geopolitical imaginings enter into everyday life through the media.  How, for instance, do television and film shape ordinary Americans’ understandings of the Darfur conflict and the ‘War on Terror’?  Finally, we examine how geopolitical viewpoints and geopolitical realities have changed in the post-Cold War world, and how a variety of phenomena—from the creation of terrorist networks to the emergence of global environmental movements—challenge existing geopolitical thinking.

GEOGRAPHY 313-001 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
“The Geography of Global Development”

T TH  12:30p.m. - 1:45p.m. CALLCOT 101
Dr. Edward Carr (7-1854)

This course introduces students to the geography of global development, examining the opportunities and challenges that face the contemporary world of the global poor.  Grounded in economic geography, the course will engage issues of free trade, fair trade, sustainable development, globalization, economic and environmental data, international organizations like The World Bank, The International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, international debt, transnational corporations, and offshore outsourcing.

GEOGRAPHY 330-001 THE GEOGRAPHY OF DISASTERS
T TH 9:30a.m. –  10:45a.m.  CALLCOTT 202
  Mr. Eric Tate (7-5234)

       The study of disasters, their triggering mechanisms (natural, human, technological), their spatial distributions from local to global scales, and associated human responses.

GEOGRAPHY 333-001 GEOGRAPHY OF POPULAR MUSIC
T TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 011
Dr. John Jakubs (7-6604)
 email:  jjakubs@sc.edu

This course examines the role of popular music in society focusing on the unique geographic nature of US/American music forms (e.g., country, blues, jazz, rock n'  roll, etc.).  Basic geographic processes and concepts (e.g., diffusion, migration, cultural landscape, economic multipliers, etc.) are introduced and discussed within the contextual framework of popular music.  Topics include the diffusion of the Delta Blues, Folk and Protest music, the British Invasion, Punks and Rastas, Rap, World Music, etc.  The student is introduced to elements of cultural, economic, urban, environmental and political geography while discussing important topics of US history such as the Civil Rights movement, the Cold War, and the impact of the music industry on society.  Teaching methods include lectures, music, videos, and guest speakers/performers. 

GEOGRAPHY 341-001 - CARTOGRAPHY
MW 12:20p.m. – 1:10p.m.  CALLCOTT 003
LAB:  F 12:20p.m. – 1:10p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Sarah Battersby  (7-5729)

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of map design. It provides the student with an understanding of the most appropriate ways of symbolizing geographic data on maps. Students develop cartographic skills through the completion of map projects using the latest Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. Students learn how to design effective and attractive maps through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and creating their own maps. In the latter half of the course, each student completes a final mapping project, based on a topic he or she selects.

GEOGRAPHY 343-001 HUMAN INPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT
MW  8:40a.m.  – 9:45a.m. CALLCOTT 202
Dr. Kirstin Dow  (7-2482)

Human actions have transformed the Earth.  To understand "nature" today requires examining the interactions between humans, our social systems, and the biochemical processes that generate particular patterns of environmental damage across the globe - degradation of rich coastal systems, heavy losses of tropical biodiversity, alterations in the global climate, desertification of marginal arid lands, and concentrations of municipal and industrial wastes associated with increasing urbanization. The class addresses these impacts and strategies for reducing or responding to them.  Evaluation in the course will be based upon a series of exams and short papers/assignments.

GEOGRAPHY 345-001 INTERPRETATION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS
MW  9:05a.m. - 9:55a.m. CALLCOTT 003
 Lab:  F 9:05a.m. – 9:55p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Subhajit Ghoshal  (7-5234)

            This course introduces the basics of aerial photography including radiant energy, properties of the photographic image, photo geometry, photogrammetric measurement, photo acquisition, and interpretation of aerial photographs.  Emphasis is placed on practical training in an effort to make the student a competent user of air photos for a variety of geographic and multidisciplinary applications. 

GEOGRAPHY 347-001 WATER AS A RESOURCE
T TH 11:00a.m. – 12:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Allan James (7-6117)

This is a survey course on basic concepts and tools of water resources management.  It begins  with the hydrologic cycle and develops a fundamental understanding of water systems, water  quality, and water-related hazards.  It then covers historical and contemporary water uses for  municipal, agricultural, industrial, and power-generation purposes, as well as global  distributions of supply and demand.  Institutional controls on water use in the United States  will be emphasized, including the economics of water, water rights law, and legislative  controls such as the Clean Water Act and the National Environmental Policy Act.   Grades  will be based on two exams (70%), exercises (20%), attendance (5%), and participation in a  one-day field excursion (5%).

GEOGRAPHY 363-001 & 002  INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MW 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CALLCOTT 201
Lab I: F 10:10 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CALLCOTT 005
Lab II: F 11:15a.m. – 12:05p.m. CALLCOTT 005
    Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976)

Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.  Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with an emphasis on modeling the Earth and abstracting geographical data, collection of geographical data using modern techniques such as GPS, and analysing patterns and spatial relationships. 

Practical experience with GIS is provided during the lab exercises using a state-of-the-art GI System. Students are expected to be comfortable with the Microsoft windows interface.

GEOGRAPHY 363-003  INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
 TH 11:00a.m  – 12:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 003
 LAB: T 11:00a.m.--12:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 005
 Dr. Diansheng Guo  (7-2989)

Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.
Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with emphasis on spatial data, manipulation and analysis, and applications.  Practical experience with GIS is provided through hands-on computer and manual exercises.  Students are expected to be familiar with the Microsoft windows interface.
           

GEOGRAPHY 370-001 AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS
T TH  12:30p.m.  – 1:45p.m.  CALLCOTT 201
Dr. John Kupfer (7-6739)

This course introduces students to the major resource, managerial and recreational components of America’s National Park system. To provide a context for understanding current management issues, we will begin with an examination of the National Park Service’s history, development, explicit mission, and decision-making framework. These will be followed by broad-brush treatments and case studies of current issues facing park system units, including wildfire management, invasive species, species reintroductions, pollution, recreation pressure, and other significant environmental changes.

GEOGRAPHY 399 -- INDEPENDENT STUDY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
  Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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GEOGRAPHY 498 -- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

  (*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
   Dr. William Graf (7-5234)  CALLCOTT 127

GEOGRAPHY 499 -- UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
         (*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)        
  T B A
  Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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GEOGRAPHY 511-001 PLANNING AND LOCATIONAL ANALYSIS
T TH 11:00a.m. – 12:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 101
Dr. John Jakubs (7-6604)

Through lectures, slides, discussions and classroom simulations students learn the rudiments of land use planning as well as the potentials and realizations of planning to date.  The U.S. is the focus of attention, but comparisons are made with the United Kingdom where planning has had a stronger role.  Students review land use, transportation and neighborhood plans focused on Columbia but placed within the broader context of U.S. planning efforts.  They learn about land use controls, growth controls, and population, employment and land use forecasting methods and models.  Practicing planners address the class as guest speakers and at least one local field trip is included in the course.  Evaluation consists of take-home exercises, two examinations and a short paper focusing on a local planning issue.

GEOGRAPHY 512-001 MIGRATION AND GLOBALIZATION
T TH 12:30p.m. – 1:45p.m. CALLCOTT 112
Dr. Caroline Nagel  (7-4970)

Migration has been one of the most significant forces shaping the political, economic and social landscapes of the contemporary world system.  Today, no region or country is isolated from the changes wrought by population movement. The increasing scale and diversity of migration can be linked to changing patterns of development associated with ‘globalization’.  But migration is not simply an outcome of globalization; instead migration actively creates ‘the global’ by forging expansive networks of people, commodities, cultures, and political action.  In this course, we will explore historical and contemporary migration flows and the processes driving these flows, the impacts of migration on places of origin and destinations, and the multiple linkages that exist between migrants and their places of origin.     We will also give special attention to border politics, citizenship and integration policies, gender and migration, and new urban spaces of ‘superdiversity’.  

GEOGRAPHY 516-001 COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT
T TH 2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m. CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Jean Ellis (7-1593)

Coastal regions in the United States are under intense anthropogenic and natural pressures. This course integrates physical, social, and economic principles underpinning contemporary coastal management practices. In this course, students will learn about the competing interests of coastal zone stakeholders, environmentalists, and major industry, including landowners, tourism and recreation, fisheries, and natural resource extraction. Concepts of conservation, preservation, and sustainability related to coastal regions will be discussed. Students will learn the dominant coastal physical processes as a basis for understanding coastal zone management practices. Coastal zone management practices and policies will be considered at multiple spatial scales: international, federal, regional, state, and local, with a focus on the United States Coastal Zone Management Act and the South Carolina Coastal Zone Management Plan. The physical, social, and policy-based impacts of sea level rise and coastal hazards will also be discussed.

GEOGRAPHY 541-001 ADVANCED CARTOGRAPHY
M W  2:30p.m. – 3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 003
LAB: W 2:30p.m. – 3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Sarah Battersby (7-5729)

This course examines current issues and approaches in cartography and geographic visualization, focusing on the uses of interactivity and animation in cartography in order to facilitate thinking, problem solving, and decision making.  Through a series of mini-projects during the first part of the course, the student will gain experience in the use of computers and graphics software to develop interactive cartographic visualizations.  Students will complete a fully interactive or animated, web-publishable map as a final project. 

GEOG 546-001 APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY
M W 2:30p.m. – 4:30p.m.CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Cary Mock (7-1211)

This course involves the application of climatic datasets and techniques to understand their relationships on how climate impacts various environmental and social systems.  The approach of this course deals with climatic applications ranging at geographic scales from regional to local.  Methodologies include the main principles of understanding radiation, microclimatic, and statistical data to climate problems such as involved in agriculture, water resources, drought, air quality, urban heat island, and weather hazards.

GEOG 549-001 WATER AND RESOURCES
T TH 12:30p.m. – 1:45p.m.  CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Allan James (7-6117)

This course examines watersheds from a geographic perspective.  The focus is on physical aspects of environmental systems that generate and receive water and sediment, and on  interactions with humans.  Topics are divided into three areas: physical hydrology, water quality, and water-related hazards.  Discussions of physical hydrology emphasize surface-water processes, runoff generation, and flow conveyance (evapotranspiration, infiltration,  runoff, channels, lakes, wetlands, etc.) as well as the growing role of the hydrosphere in  global-change studies.  The topic of water quality includes basic constituents in water, measurement  methods, and processes of non-point source pollution production.  Coverage of water hazards will focus on physical and technical aspects of flood-risk assessment.  This  course is recommended for Earth science students and environmental resources managers  who want to develop a broad, intuitive, and analytical understanding of processes interacting at the watershed scale. 

GEOG 552-001 LiDARgrammetric and Photogrammetric Digital Surface Mapping
M 4:00p.m. – 5:15pm CALLCOTT 003
Lab: W 4:00p.m. – 5:15pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976)

The purpose of the course is to present concepts and approaches for mapping the Earth’s terrain and vegetative surface from photogrammetric and lidargrammetric technologies.  Both technologies are state-of-the-art in practical applications.  The goal of each approach is to correctly determine the geographic position (in x-y-z) of surface features.  Both technologies use fundamental algebraic approaches for determining position. Photogrammetry is fundamentally based on stereography while lidargrammetry is based on position from trilateration of visible/infrared light.  Each week, the concepts and methods will be presented and discussed. Laboratory assignments will then require students to apply these approaches to imagery and data for mapping the location of elevation, vegetative, and buildings.  Graduate students will conduct an independent final project using either lidargrammetric or photogrammetric methods.

GEOG 554-001 SPATIAL PROGRAMMING
T 12:30p.m. – 1:45pm CALLCOTT 003
TH  12:30p.m. – 1:45pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. Diansheng Guo (7-2989)

Spatial Programming.  Computer programming of spatial problems; spatial statistical analysis, interactive graphics, and computer maps.

GEOGRAPHY E562-300 SATELLITE MAPPING & GLOBAL
 POSITIONING  SYSTEMS

Pre-requisite GEOG 345 OR GEOG 363 OR GEOG 551 OR
CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR
T TH 5:30p.m.- 6:45 p.m.CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Lewis Lapine (7-5234)

Technology and use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) for mapping applications.  Discussion of the GPS space segment, receiver technologies, range observable and positioning accuracy.  In depth discussion of geodetic datums, coordinate systems and projections.  Applications to large/medium scale mapping applications, remote sensing, and aerial photographic missions. The student is advised that the course provides an In depth explanation of the physics, measurement concepts, accuracy estimation and error analysis.  A fundamental understanding of trigonometry and analytical calculus is required. Other Campus Units with Interest? Geology, Engineering, Marine Science.

Additional Resources needed:  University provided PC=s running Windows 3.1 or higher.  Justification. The global positioning system (GPS) technology is a dual-use satellite-based positioning technology that became fully operational in 1993.  GPS is a key data collection methodology for geographic mapping applications, remote sensing imagery collections, and the construction of geographic information system (GIS) databases.

The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamental material of satellite-based positioning, variations in the positioning methods, and the application to design/ construction of geographic databases.  The material in this course is complimentary with the content geographic information processing (GIP) courses in the Geography Department and is an essential part of the evolutionary nature of the GIP curriculum.

GEOGRAPHY 563-001 & 002: ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T TH  9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m.   CALLCOTT 003
Lab I:  T TH  9:30a.m. – 10:45a.m.  CALLCOTT 005
Lab II: TH 11:00a.m. – 12:15p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Christopher Upchurch  (7-5867)

This course covers the technical and conceptual bases of Geographic Information Systems.  This includes how GIS is used to perform spatial analysis, analysis of networks, incorporation of remote sensing data, and three-dimensional surfaces.  An integral part of this course is the extensive experience students gain using an operational geographic information system.  This experience allows the exploration of theoretical topics presented as well as examination and formulation of real-world applications areas as diverse as real estate, crime analysis, environmental protection.

GEOG 568-001 HUMAN DIMENSIONS  OF GLOBAL
ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE
Prereq. Geog 343 or consent of  Instructor
MW  2:30p.m. – 3:45p.m. CALLCOTT 202
Dr. Kirstin Dow (7-2482)

While global environmental change is a physical phenomenon, understanding social systems is crucial to investigating causes, consequences, and response opportunities. Human activities have always resulted in environmental change at local levels; however, environmental change on the global scale is a different type of problem.  Current human-induced environmental changes are taking place at scales, rates, and magnitudes that often exceed those of natural systems and demand innovation in social systems, such as international governance. The cumulative impact of large populations and local activities are adding to the pace of change. Social processes driving these transformations, such as trade, development, migration, urbanization, and environmental awareness, are increasingly operating at global scales and creating new linkages among places.

The focus of reading, discussion, and research is on the social processes shaping environmental changes. Major sections of the course will deal with the role of human driving forces, social processes of defining environmental problems, assessments of consequences, and social and policy responses.  This course introduces the physical dimensions of global environmental change, however, Geography 343 - Human Impact on the Environment, Biology 270, GEOL 103 or permission of the instructor is required.

GEOG 569-001 ENVIRONMENT & DEVELOPMENT/ANTH 569-001
T TH  2:00p.m. – 3:15p.m.  CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Edward Carr (7-1854)

This course explores the intersection of international development and environmental change, considering both how development creates environmental change, and how environmental change (such as global climate change) affects development efforts.  Students will become familiar with theories of development, issues of environmental change and degradation, and how they come together in particular places through both conceptual and case-study readings.

GEOGRAPHY 595-001 -- INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY
(*A Signed Internship Contract Required by the Instructor before Enrolling)
T B A
  Dr. John Jakubs (7-6604) CALLCOTT 120

The internship in geography helps students acquire valuable "on the job" experience and develop marketable job skills as well as learn about employment opportunities and requirements.  Students serve as interns with cooperating government agencies, or commercial and nonprofit businesses.  A special effort is made to assign each intern to a position compatible with his/her interests, abilities, and career aspirations.  The course is graded on a pass/not pass basis.  Grades are determined by the Internship Director in consultation with supervisory personnel in cooperating agencies.  Grades are based on the performance of internship duties and the preparation of an internship summary report.

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GEOGRAPHY 705 -- DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.

GEOGRAPHY 706 -- SELECTED TOPICS IN CART/RS
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.

GEOG 721-001 SEMINAR IN SYSTEMATIC GEOGRAPHY:
Geography of  Development & Anti-Development
TH 2:00p.m. - 4:30p.m. CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Edward Carr (7-1854)

Beginning with a critical interrogation of the concept of development itself, this course examines the theories and meanings that underlie development practice.  Students will examine the historical development of development theories, the basic features of the related history of development practices, and major critiques of development with the goal that, by the end of the course, they will be grounded not only in development theory/practice/discourse, but also in influential contemporary critiques of and forms of resistance to development.

GEOGRAPHY 731-001 SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN GEOG
M 12:20p.m. – 2:50p.m. CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Diansheng Guo (7-2989)


This seminar introduces contemporary quantitative analysis methods in geography, concentrating on methods for analyzing geographic phenomena represented by spatial, temporal, and multivariate data. The course will cover: (1) multivariate methods using the Generalized Linear Model (GLM), including those used for pattern searching (such as Principal Components Analysis) and those used for prediction (such as multivariate regression); (2) non-linear methods for prediction (such as decision trees, neural networks) and clustering (such as self-organizing maps, hierarchical clustering,); and (3) space-time scan statics and spatial dependence analysis methods. Students learn to use these methods from lectures, discussion, and practical application to their own data sets.

GEOGRAPHY 740-001 RESEARCH TRENDS IN GEOGRAPHY
W 11:15a.m.  – 1:45p.m. CALLCOTT 112
Dr. William Graf (7-5234)

Seminar in research in geography, focusing on refining research questions and writing research proposals.  The final product of the course will be a draft proposal for each student.

GEOG 747-001 SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
F  9:30a.m. – 12:00p.m. CALLCOTT 228
Dr. John Kupfer(7-6739)

GEOG747: Seminar in Physical Geography - Principles of Landscape Ecology. Landscape ecology is the study of spatial pattern and its relationship to ecological process at a range of scales. The goal of this course is to introduce principal and emerging concepts in landscape ecology as well as some of the techniques used in landscape ecological research, with an emphasis on geographic information systems, remote sensing and spatial analysis. There are four topical areas to be covered in the course: 1) The three major factors responsible for landscape patterns (physical/environmental factors, biotic factors, disturbance); 2) The detection and quantification of landscape pattern, including the use of neutral models and scale analysis; 3) The analysis and prediction of landscape change, and 4) Applications of landscape ecology to land management. It is not expected that students will have had previous coursework in biogeography, ecology, GIS, remote sensing or spatial ecology; rather, the seminar will hopefully build on what you DO know while providing all of the necessary information that you DON’T know along the way. The format of the class is part seminar (discussion of readings) and part application (applying the methods to a sample dataset). Students will be evaluated on the basis of a final research paper that involves utilizing the theories and methods discussed in this class to address a specific hypothesis or research application.

GEOGRAPHY 751-001 DIGITAL TECHNIQUES OF REMOTE SENSING
T  2:00p.m. – 4:30p.m. CALLCOTT 005
Dr. John Jensen (7-5790)

This course investigates the principles of digital image processing which can be applied to remotely sensed imagery to extract meaningful thematic (e.g., crop type, land cover) and biophysical (e.g., biomass, temperature, color) information. Emphasis is placed on understanding the logic and appropriate application of image restoration, enhancement, analysis, classification, and change detection algorithms, and accuracy assessment. Several interactive digital image processing system (e.g., ERDAS, ENVI, Image Analyst) are used by the students to analyze satellite and airborne-acquired remotely sensed images.  Evaluation will be based on approximately 10 exercises (20%), a mid-term examination (30%), a final examination (30%), and a term project (20%).

GEOG 763-001 SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
W 1:25p.m. – 3:55p.m. CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Christopher Upchurch (7-5867)
Topic:  Web-Based GIS


The purpose of the course is to study selected research topics in geographical information systems.  The methods used to examine each topic are both pragmatic and theoretical; including GIS assignments (mini-tasks), review of research articles (or relevant chapters), and classroom discussion.  The Spring 2007 semester we will focus entirely on Internet/Web methods for GIS applications.  Many of the concepts and implementation approaches change rapidly in Web-Based GIS.  The current areas of interest are web services, AJAX with implementations using Visual Studios, ArcServer, Googlemaps/Earth, MS Virtual Earth.  These are the concept and implementation alternatives that we will concentrate on in the Spring of 2008 seminar.  The Department has purchased a new web server for this and related courses.

GEOGRAPHY 799 -- THESIS PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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GEOG 801-001 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES  TO GEOGRAPHY
W 9:05a.m. – 11:35a.m.  CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Susan Cutter (7-1590)

Career management, professional development, ethics, and a geography career prospective for PhD students with degrees in geography; includes a group project in support of the department. 

GEOGRAPHY 805 -- DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION PROCESSING

(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics in geographical information processing processing to be individually supervised by graduate faculty.

GEOGRAPHY 899 – DISSERTATION PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)  T B A
Dr. William Graf (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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