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Spring 2011 Class Schedule

Course levels: Undergraduates may take 100- through 500-level courses. Graduate students will only receive credit for courses numbered at the 500-level and above. Some class material may be available on-line.

 |  200  |  300  |  400  |  500  |  700  |  800

GEOGRAPHY 103-001– INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
 MW  2:30 pm – 3:45 pmCALLCOTT 011
Ms. Sarah Schwartz (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts

GEOGRAPHY 103-002 – INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
T TH  12:30 pm – 1:45 pm  CALLCOTT 011
Mr.  Robert Greeley  (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also shows how geographic knowledge is relevant to current issues of globalization.

GEOGRAPHY 103-003 – INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
MWF 10:10 am. –11:00 am. CALLCOTT 101
Ms. Stephanie Dodds  (7-5234)

This course introduces students to the breadth and excitement of the field of geography and illustrates the earth science, culture-environment, locational, and area analysis traditions of geographic research and writing. It also explores the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts

GEOGRAPHY E104-300 – INTRO TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
MW 5:30 pm -6:45 pm CALLCOTT  101
Ms. Kirstin Hunt (7-5234)

Physical geography is an area of study that synthesizes and connects elements of our physical environment as they relate to human beings. GEOG 104 is an introductory level course that explores the processes and forms of Earth's surface system, including climate, hydrology, soils, biogeography, water resources, and landforms. The objective of this course is to provide a systematic introduction to physical geography, emphasizing the basic principles that explain the processes and forms of the atmosphere (including climates and meteorology), hydrosphere (including rivers and oceans), biosphere (with emphasis on the distribution and diversity of organisms), and the geosphere (with emphasis on the surface forms and processes).  Dominant themes of the course include the spatial distribution of basic physical, chemical, and biological processes, as well as interactions of human societies with the natural systems that support them.
 

GEOGRAPHY 105-001 – THE DIGITAL EARTH
         T 2:00 pm -3:15 pm CALLCOTT 003
Lab:  TH 2:00 pm- 3:15 pm CALLCOTT 005
Mr. Wm. Lynn Shirley (7-4590) 

The Digital Earth is an introductory survey course about how the earth is represented in digital formats (e.g. maps) and how it can be viewed and analyzed:  from global positioning systems (GPS), aerial photography and remote sensing as means of capturing earth images, to geographic information systems (GIS) and cartographic visualization as means of analyzing and displaying spatial information.  Students will use GPS equipment, learn to create 3-D building representations and be exposed to leading edge trends in mapping technology – with examples from everyday life like web maps and smart phones.

A balance of lecture and hands-on, in-class computer exercises are used to introduce conceptsusing applications like Google Earth, ArcGIS, SketchUp, and ArcPAD.  Only basic Windows operating system experience is assumed. 

GEOGRAPHY 121- 001– LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
T TH 11:00 am - 12:15 pm CALLCOTT 011
Ms. N. Jensen  (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world.  

GEOGRAPHY 121- 002 – LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
MWF 11:15 am – 12:05 pm CALLCOTT 201
Manali Baruah (7-5234)

This introductory class examines the world through geographic regions - bounded parts of the world considered as one because they possess some sort of organizing principal.  To frame this course around this concept, however, is not to take it for granted.  In the course of the semester, we will examine not only how the organizing principals that give us regions like "Latin America" came about, but also the various benefits and drawbacks to the continued use of such regions to understand our increasingly interconnected world. 

GEOGRAPHY 201-001, 002, 003 – LANDFORM  GEOGRAPHY
9:30 am – 10:45 am T TH CALLCOTT 201
Dr. Allan James  (7-6117)
Lab I:  TH 11:00 am – 12:50 pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab II:  TH 1:25 pm – 3:15 pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab III: TH 3:15pm – 5:05 pm CALLCOTT 202

This course is an introduction to the physical features on the Earth's  land surface emphasizing soils, hydrology, and processes of landform  creation by water, wind, ice, and gravity.  Landforms and soils provide evidence of past environmental conditions, how they have  changed, and the processes involved, including human actions and natural agents.  The course emphasizes environmental changes in the recent geologic past up  to the present.  Three hours of lectures and one 110-minute laboratory per week. 

GEOGRAPHY 202-001 & 002 – WEATHER AND CLIMATE
T TH 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm CALLCOTT 102
  Dr. April Hiscox (7-6604)
Lab I:   W 12:20 pm - 2:10 pm   CALLCOTT  004
Lab I:  W 12:20 pm - 2:10 pm   CALLCOTT  005
Lab II: W 2:30 pm - 4:20 pm – 4:20 pm CALLCOTT 004
Lab II: W 3:45 pm – 4:20 pm CALLCOTT  005

This course provides students with a general understanding of the processes which influence weather and climate patterns on the earth.  It first examines the sources of energy driving atmospheric processes, the importance of atmospheric moisture, and the forces creating the winds.  The second part of the course focuses on storm systems, including mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather.  The last third of the class is devoted to the study of climate, climate variability and change, and the impact of such change on human activity.  The laboratory sections will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics.  The final grade will be based on three lecture exams, three lab exams, take-home exercises, a weather journal, and regular lecture and lab quizzes.  *4 credit hour course, includes a 2 hour laboratory each week.

GEOGRAPHY 210-001– PEOPLES, PLACES and ENVIRONMENTS
T TH 11:00 am – 12:15 pm  CALLCOTT 201
Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

This course provides a thematic introduction to contemporary human geography, a broad geographic subfield directly concerned with human beings and their interaction with their natural and cultural environment.  The course explores themes of urbanization, population growth, rural to urban and international migrations, international development, territorial sovereignties, statehood and terrorism, and the cultural geographies of place and landscapes, just to name a few, to illustrate how these different concerns are linked through geographic perspectives and methods of investigation.  

GEOGRAPHY 221-001 – GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
MWF 9:05 am -9:55 am CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Jerry T. Mitchell (7-2986)

An intensive regional analysis of South Carolina. Selected phenomena such as urbanization, industrialization, land use, the physical environment, and their interrelationships.

GEOGRAPHY 223-001 – GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA / LASP 331
T TH 12:30 pm  – 1:45 pm CALLCOTT 201
Mr. James Byrum (7-6380)

An introduction to the physical and human geography of Latin America. Lectures are structured in 5 major areas: (i) physical geography (different ecosystems,  climate, vegetation, and land patterns), (ii) historical geography (the impact that colonization had on indigenous peoples, on the social and political organization of the region, and on the behavioral aspects of its individuals), (iii) population geography (racial and ethnic composition; population growth and demographic transition; patterns of mortality, fertility and migration; settlement patterns; religious practices; and urbanization), (iv) economic geography (patterns of economic activity, and the potential influences of international economic cycles and organizations), and (v) political geography (political changes, including national governments and international policies).

GEOGRAPHY 226-001 – GEOGRAPHY OF THE MIDDLE EAST
T TH 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Amy Mills (7-5688)

This course approaches the region of the Middle East from a human geography perspective and does not attempt to cover the entire region. Rather, students in this course will use geographic concepts to: 1) develop an understanding of historic and contemporary cultures and environments in the Middle East and; 2) examine current topics and debates in the Middle East as local expressions of geographic connections to the region and to global processes.  The course begins with a historical geographic overview of the region and then focuses on specific country examples and special topics in social, cultural, economic, and political geography.  Among the topics to be covered are: expansion of Islam, Islamic cities, and medieval Islamic geography; colonial and national boundaries; urbanization and poverty; environmental resources in culture and politics; gender, veiling, and Islamic feminism; and current debates in society and culture.

GEOGRAPHY 313-001 – ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
T TH  9:30 am - 10:45 am CALLCOT 101
Mr. James Byrum  (7-6380)

This course introduces students to the local and global dimensions of economic activity in the contemporary world economy. The course material, which includes: texts, films, newspaper articles, and lectures, will help students to develop both an understanding of economic processes and the skills to analyze economic processes within complex social and political contexts. The subjects covered in this course are very topical and contemporary; they include: Economic Globalization, The World Bank, The International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, International Debt Crises, Export Processing Zones, International Labor Migrations, Transnational Corporations, and Offshore Outsourcing.


GEOGRAPHY 341-001 – CARTOGRAPHY
MW 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm  CALLCOTT 003
Dr. Sarah Battersby  (7-5729)
          LAB:  F 12:20 pm – 1:10 pm CALLCOTT 005

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of map design. It provides the student with an understanding of the most appropriate ways of symbolizing geographic data on maps. Students develop cartographic skills through the completion of map projects using the latest Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software. Students learn how to design effective and attractive maps through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, and creating their own maps. In the latter half of the course, each student completes a final mapping project, based on a topic he or she selects.

GEOGRAPHY 345-001 – INTERPRETATION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS
T 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm CALLCOTT 003
Subhajit Ghoshal  (7-5234)
Lab:  TH 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm CALLCOTT 005

This course introduces the basics of aerial photography including radiant energy, properties of the photographic image, photo geometry, photogrammetric measurement, photo acquisition, and interpretation of aerial photographs.  Emphasis is placed on practical training in an effort to make the student a competent user of air photos for a variety of geographic and multidisciplinary applications.  

GEOGRAPHY 346-001 – CLIMATE AND SOCIETY
T TH 11:00 am – 12:15 pm  CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Cary Mock (7-1211)

This course examines the interrelationship between climate and human activities. We will study the physical nature of the climate system, climate variability and change; and their climatic impacts on society, including the social, economic, and political factors involved with these impacts. The approach will be based mostly from the examination of selected case studies.  Specific topics that will be covered include past climatic change and society during the presettlement era, perceptions and impacts of climate during the historical period in North America, climate determinism, severe drought, climatic hazards which include hurricanes, climate and health, future global warming, and stratospheric ozone.   Class sessions will vary between lecture, discussion, debates, and in-class exercises.  Evaluation will be based on short writing assignments and exams. There are no course prerequisites.

GEOGRAPHY 363-001– INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MW 10:10 am – 11:00 am CALLCOTT 201
Staff (7-5234)
Lab I: F 10:10 am – 11:00 am CALLCOTT 005

Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.  Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with an emphasis on modeling the Earth and abstracting geographical data, collection of geographical data using modern techniques such as GPS, and analysing patterns and spatial relationships. 

Practical experience with GIS is provided during the lab exercises using a state-of-the-art GI System. Students are expected to be comfortable with the Microsoft windows interface.

GEOGRAPHY 371-001 – AIR POLUTION AND CLIMATOLOGY
T TH 9:30 am – 10:45 am CALLCOTT 102
Dr. April Hiscox (7-6608)

Air pollution—at local, regional, and global scales—stands as one of the most important environmental problems of the modern technological age. This course examines the processes and issues that relate to air pollution. Emphasis is on the role of the atmosphere in air quality. Additional topics of enquiry include sources of air pollution, environmental and health effects of air pollution, air quality sampling and monitoring, urban smog, and ozone depletion. 

GEOGRAPHY 399 – INDEPENDENT STUDY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)        
T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

GEOGRAPHY 498 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234) 
CALLCOTT 127

GEOGRAPHY 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)        
T B A
Dr. Gregory J. Carbone (7-5234)
CALLCOTT 127

GEOGRAPHY 516-001 – COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT
T TH 11:00 am – 12:15 pm CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Jean Ellis (7-1593)

Coastal regions in the United States are under intense anthropogenic and natural pressures. This course integrates physical, social, and economic principles underpinning contemporary coastal management practices. In this course, students will learn about the competing interests of coastal zone stakeholders, environmentalists, and major industry, including landowners, tourism and recreation, fisheries, and natural resource extraction. Concepts of conservation, preservation, and sustainability related to coastal regions will be discussed. Students will learn the dominant coastal physical processes as a basis for understanding coastal zone management practices. Coastal zone management practices and policies will be considered at multiple spatial scales: international, federal, regional, state, and local, with a focus on the United States Coastal Zone Management Act and the South Carolina Coastal Zone Management Plan. The physical, social, and policy-based impacts of sea level rise and coastal hazards will also be discussed.

GEOGRAPHY 541-001 – ADVANCED CARTOGRAPHY
M  4:00 pm – 5:15 pm CALLCOTT 003
LAB: W 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Sarah Battersby (7-5729)

This course examines current issues and approaches in cartography and geographic visualization, focusing on the uses of interactivity and animation in cartography in order to facilitate thinking, problem solving, and decision making.  Through a series of mini-projects during the first part of the course, the student will gain experience in the use of computers and graphics software to develop interactive cartographic visualizations.  Students will complete a fully interactive or animated, web-publishable map as a final project. 

GEOG 549-001 – WATER AND RESOURCES
T TH 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm  CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Allan James (7-6117)

This course examines watersheds from a geographic perspective. The focus is on physical aspects of environmental systems that generate and receive surface water and sediment, and on interactions with humans. The course is divided into three topical areas: physical hydrology, water quality, and water-related hazards. Physical hydrology emphasizes the surface-water processes of runoff generation, flow conveyance, and the role of the hydrosphere in global-change studies. Water quality includes basic constituents in water, measurement methods, and processes of non-point source pollution production. Water hazards focus on physical and technical aspects of floodplain management and flood-risk assessment. This course is recommended for Earth science students and environmental resources managers who want to develop a broad, intuitive, and analytical understanding of  processes interacting at the watershed scale.

GEOGRAPHY 563-001 – ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T  9:30 am – 10:45 am   CALLCOTT 003
Dr. Christopher Upchurch  (7-5867)
Lab I:  TH  9:30 am – 10:45 am  CALLCOTT 005

This course covers the technical and conceptual bases of Geographic Information Systems.  This includes how GIS is used to perform spatial analysis, analysis of networks, incorporation of remote sensing data, and three-dimensional surfaces.  An integral part of this course is the extensive experience students gain using an operational geographic information system.  This experience allows the exploration of theoretical topics presented as well as examination and formulation of real-world applications areas as diverse as real estate, crime analysis, environmental protection.

GEOGRAPHY 563-003 ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T  TH 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm CALLCOTT 003/005
Dr. Christopher Upchurch  (7-5867)
Lab: T TH 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm CALLCOTT 003/005

This course covers the technical and conceptual bases of Geographic Information Systems.  This includes how GIS is used to perform spatial analysis, analysis of networks, incorporation of remote sensing data, and three-dimensional surfaces.  An integral part of this course is the extensive experience students gain using an operational geographic information system.  This experience allows the exploration of theoretical topics presented as well as examination and formulation of real-world applications areas as diverse as real estate, crime analysis, environmental protection.

GEOGRAPHY 565-001 – GIS DATABASES AND THEIR USE
M 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm CALLCOTT 003
W 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976)

Representation, construction, maintenance, and analysis of spatial data in a geographic information system (GIS) database.

Prerequisites: One of the following: GEOG 363, 341, 551, or 563

GEOGRAPHY 567-001 – LONG TERM ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE
T TH 2:00p.m – 3:15 pm CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Cary Mock (7-1211)

An understanding of past environmental changes is imperative in order to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic variability and to assess how global climate changes impact various components of the physical landscape.  This course provides an overview of the tools and databases used to study past climatic changes and associated environmental responses that occur in the biosphere, oceans, and lithosphere.  An emphasis will be placed on 1) the Quaternary (last 2.5 million years), as it is during this timeframe that the global climate system experienced multiple glacial/interglacial cycles and numerous rapid climatic changes (similar as portrayed in movie “The Day After Tomorrow”); and 2) the past 1000 years since high resolution annual changes at this timeframe are important for planning schemes and societal impacts.  Specific topics also include an overview of different data types for paleoenvironmental reconstruction and paleoclimatic implications on future global warming.  

GEOGRAPHY 581-001 – GLOBALIZATION & CULTURAL QUESTIONS / ANTH 581
T TH 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm Hamilton 318
Dr. Ann Kingslover

This course on events and processes glossed as "globalization" will survey theoretical, historical, economic, diasporic, migration, identity, gender, work, human rights, social movements, language, media, religious, environmental and agricultural, and health themes related to globalization. The class will do a small collaborative research project with students in another country, via a wiki. Students will also write individual research papers.

GEOGRAPHY 595-001 – INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY

(*A Signed Internship Contract Required by the Instructor before Enrolling)
T B A
Dr. Michael Hodgson (7-8976) CALLCOTT 326

The internship in geography helps students acquire valuable "on the job" experience and develop marketable job skills as well as learn about employment opportunities and requirements.  Students serve as interns with cooperating government agencies, or commercial and nonprofit businesses.  A special effort is made to assign each intern to a position compatible with his/her interests, abilities, and career aspirations.  The course is graded on a pass/not pass basis.  Grades are determined by the Internship Director in consultation with supervisory personnel in cooperating agencies.  Grades are based on the performance of internship duties and the preparation of an internship summary report.

GEOGRAPHY 705 – DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHY
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127
Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty. 

GEOGRAPHY 706 – SELECTED TOPICS IN CART/RS
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127
Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.

GEOGRAPHY 730-001 – SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY
M 1:25 pm – 3:55 pm CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Kirstin Dow (7-2482)

Analysis of geographic research on nature-society interactions with an emphasis on climate change adaptation.  (Prereq: GEOG 530 or GEOG 568)

GEOGRAPHY 740-001 – RESEARCH TRENDS IN GEOGRAPHY
F 2:30 pm- 5:00 pm  CALLCOTT 112
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234)

Seminar in research in geography, focusing on refining research questions and writing research proposals.  

GEOG 747-001 – SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
F  9:30 am – 12:00 pm CALLCOTT 228
Dr. John Kupfer (7-6739)

Seminar in Physical Geography: Connectivity in Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems. Understanding the effects of spatial pattern on ecological processes is at the heart of landscape ecology so it is not surprising that connectivity, the connectedness of landscape elements or the landscape mosaic as a whole, has been and continues to be a primary research topic and one with relevance to a broad range of fields. For example, the maintenance of connectivity is being promoted as a key biodiversity conservation strategy to combat habitat loss, fragmentation and as an adaptation strategy to climate change. Within landscape ecology, the focus of connectivity is often on how it influences the dispersal of organisms across landscapes, riverscapes or seascapes, thereby affecting gene flow, extinction and recolonization rates in habitat patches. However, the term can be applied to the movement or propagation of a much broader range of phenomena, including the movement of water through watersheds, the fluxes of energy across landscapes, and the propagation of disturbances such as fire. This seminar will focus on the importance and quantification of connectivity in terrestrial and aquatic systems. For more information, please contact Dr. John Kupfer, Department of Geography, kupfer@sc.edu.


 

GEOGRAPHY 751-001 – DIGITAL TECHNIQUES OF REMOTE SENSING
T  2:00 pm – 4:30 pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. John Jensen (7-5790)

This course investigates the principles of digital image processing which can be applied to remotely sensed imagery to extract meaningful thematic (e.g., crop type, land cover) and biophysical (e.g., biomass, temperature, color) information. Emphasis is placed on understanding the logic and appropriate application of image restoration, enhancement, analysis, classification, and change detection algorithms, and accuracy assessment. Several interactive digital image processing system (e.g., ERDAS, ENVI, Image Analyst) are used by the students to analyze satellite and airborne-acquired remotely sensed images.

 Evaluation will be based on approximately 10 exercises (20%), a mid-term examination (30%), a final examination (30%), and a term project (20%).

GEOGRAPHY 799 – THESIS PREPARATION

(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

GEOG 801-001 – CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES  TO GEOGRAPHY
W 9:05 am – 11:35 am  CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Susan Cutter (7-1590)

This course examines the contemporary literature in the broad field of geography.   Using a combination of readings, seminar discussions, and short papers, students will critically evaluate current topical areas, methodologies, and prevailing theoretical and conceptual orientations of the discipline.  The goal is for students to situate their own doctoral research within the broader disciplinary context.   

GEOGRAPHY 805 – DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics in geographical information processing processing to be individually supervised by graduate faculty. 

GEOGRAPHY 899 – DISSERTATION PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
 T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOG 801-001 – CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES  TO GEOGRAPHY
W 9:05 am – 11:35 am  CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Susan Cutter (7-1590)

This course examines the contemporary literature in the broad field of geography.   Using a combination of readings, seminar discussions, and short papers, students will critically evaluate current topical areas, methodologies, and prevailing theoretical and conceptual orientations of the discipline.  The goal is for students to situate their own doctoral research within the broader disciplinary context.   

GEOGRAPHY 805 – DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

Directed research topics in geographical information processing processing to be individually supervised by graduate faculty. 

GEOGRAPHY 899 – DISSERTATION PREPARATION
(*Requires Departmental Chair Approval)
 T B A
Dr. Gregory Carbone (7-5234) CALLCOTT 127

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