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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Geography


Spring 2015 Courses

Undergraduates may take 100- through 500-level courses. Graduate students will only receive credit for courses numbered at the 500-level and above.


GEOGRAPHY 103-001: INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
T TH 1:15pm – 2:30pm CALLCOTT 011
Dr. Larianne Collins (777-4973)
This course introduces students to the breadth and relevance of the field of geography. It explores the paradigms of space, place, mobility, and scale in the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also demonstrates the applicability of geography to other fields of study and current issues of globalization. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 103-002: INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
MW 2:20pm – 3:35pm CALLCOTT 011
Mr. Ronald Schumann (777-5234)
This course introduces students to the breadth and relevance of the field of geography. It explores the paradigms of space, place, mobility, and scale in the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also demonstrates the applicability of geography to other fields of study and current issues of globalization. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 103-E01: INTRO TO GEOGRAPHY
MW 5:30pm – 6:45pm CALLCOTT 201
STAFF (777-5234)
This course introduces students to the breadth and relevance of the field of geography. It explores the paradigms of space, place, mobility, and scale in the various subfields of geographic inquiry and shows how geographic expertise can be used in important decision-making and problem solving contexts. This course also demonstrates the applicability of geography to other fields of study and current issues of globalization. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 104-001: INTRO TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
MWF 10:50am – 11:40am CALLCOTT 201
Mr. Christopher Kaase (777-5234)
Physical geography synthesizes and connects elements of our physical environment as they relate to human beings. It includes many aspects of various earth and life sciences, but expresses them in a way that emphasizes patterns of interaction between elements and with humankind. This means that physical geography, like other branches of geography, examines spatial relationships – not only where things are, but also the processes that underlie the observed patterns. The objective of this course is to provide a systematic introduction to physical geography, including the major components of the earth system (atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere) as well as regulatory processes, distribution patterns of important aspects, and impacts of human activity.

 

GEOGRAPHY 105-001: THE DIGITAL EARTH
MW 2:20pm – 3:35pm CALLCOTT 202
M 2:20pm – 3:35 CALLCOTT 302
Staff (777-5234)
The Digital Earth is an introductory course about the earth and how it can be viewed and analyzed digitally.  The course covers a wide range of topics: making measurements on the earth, global positioning systems (GPS), aerial photography, remote sensing as means of capturing earth images, geographic information systems (GIS) as a means of analysis, dynamic maps on mobile devices, creating 3D structures and visualizing various types of mapping data.
     Through lecture and computer/field exercises, students will learn the basics components necessary to create and explore many types of digital earth map representations. Each topic has an accompanying lab exercise which serves to tie concept to application. No previous technical experience is assumed and only basic Windows operating system familiarity required.

 

GEOGRAPHY 121- 001: LANDS & PEOPLES OF THE WORLD
MWF 12:00pm – 12:50pm CALLCOTT 011
Dr. Conor Harrison (576-6010)
This course introduces students to diversity, inequality, and interconnectedness in the contemporary world through the lens of regional geography.  In terms of diversity, this course highlights the ways that the physical environment, social and economic systems, political relationships, and historical circumstances have produced distinctive regions, like ‘Latin America’ and ‘the Middle East’.  In terms of interconnectedness, this course explores the ways in which global processes—world trade, colonialism and neo-colonialism, geopolitical conflict, and climate change—have integrated different world regions into a complex global system.  In terms of inequality, this course gives special attention to the way that regional and global processes intersect to produce and reinforce social and geographical disparities.

  

GEOGRAPHY 201-001, 002, 003, 004: LANDFORM GEOGRAPHY
T TH 10:05am – 11:20am   CALLCOTT 201
Lab I:   W 9:40am-11:30pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab II:  W 12:00pm – 1:50pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab III: T 2:50pm – 4:40pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab IV: TH 2:50pm – 4:40 pm CALLCOTT 202
Dr. Allan James (777-6117)
This course is an introduction to the physical features on the Earth’s land surface emphasizing soils, hydrology, and processes of landform creation by water, wind, ice, and gravity.  Landforms are physical features on the Earth’s surface such as valleys, hill-slopes, beaches, sand dunes, and stream channels.  The study of landforms is one of the oldest of the natural sciences from which many classic scientific premises and methods were born.  Landforms and soils provide evidence of past environmental conditions, how they have changed, and the processes involved, including human actions and natural agents.  The course emphasizes environmental changes in the recent geologic past up to the present.  *4 credit hour course includes a 2 hour laboratory each week.

 

GEOGRAPHY 202-001, 002, 003, 004, 005: WEATHER AND CLIMATE
T TH 10:05am-11:20am PETIGRU 108  
Lab I:   T 2:50pm-4:40pm CALLCOTT 004/005
Lab II:  TH 2:50pm-4:40pm CALLCOTT 004/005
Lab III: W 9:40am-11:30am CALLCOTT 004/005
Lab IV: W 12:00pm-1:50pm CALLCOTT 004/005
Lab V:  W 3:30pm-5:20pm CALLCOTT 004/005
Dr. April Hiscox (777-6604)
This course provides students with a general understanding of the processes which influence weather and climate patterns on the earth.  It first examines the sources of energy driving atmospheric processes, the importance of atmospheric moisture, and the forces creating the winds.  The second part of the course focuses on storm systems, including mid-latitude cyclones and severe weather.  The last third of the class is devoted to the study of climate, climate variability and change, and the impact of such change on human activity.  The laboratory sections will include experiments, workbook exercises, and analysis of real-time computer weather graphics.  The final grade will be based on three lecture exams, three lab exams, take-home exercises, a weather journal, and regular lecture and lab quizzes.  *4 credit hour course includes a 2 hour laboratory each week.

 

GEOGRAPHY 210-001: PEOPLES, PLACES and ENVIRONMENTS
T TH 11:40–12:55pm CALLCOTT 011
Dr. Amy Mills (777-5688)
This course provides a thematic introduction to contemporary human geography, a broad geographic subfield directly concerned with human beings and their interaction with their natural and cultural environment.  The course uses spatial approaches and concepts from geography to explore many themes related to globalization and the interactions between people and places amongst diverse societies around the world. Some of the themes addressed in the course are: urbanization, population growth, rural to urban and international migrations, international development, territorial sovereignties, statehood and terrorism, ethnicity and race, and cultural diversity. These themes are linked through geographic perspectives and methods of investigation.

 

GEOGRAPHY 221-001: GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
MWF 9:40am – 10:30am CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Jerry T. Mitchell (777-2986)
An intensive regional analysis of South Carolina. Selected phenomena such as urbanization, industrialization, land use, the physical environment, and their interrelationships.Upon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1) demonstrate basic factual knowledge of the discipline of geography, its tools, and its terminology, 2) apply geographic concepts toward identifying the past and current landscapes of South Carolina, including the role of space in shaping patterns of race, ethnicity, economic development, and educational opportunities, 3) interpret, classify, and map spatial data of both physical and social phenomena related to South Carolina, 4) identify geographic contexts at a variety of spatial scales that shape human interaction with physical and social phenomena, and 5) generate and evaluate hypotheses to account for observed phenomena in South Carolina, whether contemporary or historic.

 

GEOGRAPHY 223-001: GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA
T TH 11:40am – 12:55pm CALLCOTT 201
Mr. James Byrum (777-6380)
An introduction to the physical and human geography of Latin America. Lectures are structured around 5 major themes in Latin America: (i) physical geography, a review of the varying ecosystems,  climate, vegetation, and land patterns of the region; (ii) historical geography, an examination of the indigenous people and the impact that European colonization had on the region, the resulting social and political organization of the region, and various cultural-behavioral aspects of the region’s people, (iii) population geography, an examination of the racial and ethnic composition of the region’s people today, its population growth and demographic transition, its patterns of mortality, fertility and migration, its settlement patterns, its religious practices, and the urbanization of the region; (iv) economic geography, an exploration of the pattern considerations of economic activities over time in the region and the potential influences of international economic cycles and organizations); and (v) political geography, the political evolution of the region, including the national governments and their international policies. Reading and writing assignments will encourage students to examine and explore differences and similarities between Anglo-America and Latin America.

 

GEOGRAPHY 228-001: GEOGRAPHY OF SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
MW 2:20pm – 3:35pm CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Edward Carr (777-1854)
Building upon a historical understanding of economic and political relationships both within Sub-Saharan Africa and between Sub-Saharan Africa and the rest of the world, this course examines contemporary patterns of social, economic and environmental change in this highly challenged world region.  To better understand the problems and potentials of this world region, this course examines particular local issues (deforestation, desertification, etc.) as complex interactions of local situations with regional and global factors.  

 

GEOGRAPHY 330-001: THE GEOGRAPHY OF DISASTERS
T TH 10:05am – 11:20am CALLCOTT 102 
GEOGRAPHY 330-E01: THE GEOGRAPHY OF DISASTERS
This is an online course. Web Based Instructional Method
Dr. Melanie Gall (777-9818)
This course introduces you to the nature and impact of as well as the social responses to disasters. We focus on the origin and characteristics of disasters, their spatial distribution, lessons learned from the great disasters, and how society anticipates and responds to disasters. The major goals of the course are to familiarize you with the range and types of environmental hazards/disasters and their geographic distribution; examine the causes or triggering mechanisms (natural, human, technological) of disasters; and assess the societal impacts to disasters on individuals, organizations, and governments from the local to global scales. By the end of the semester, you should be able to: 1) list and explain the causes of disasters, 2) describe selected historically significant major disasters , 3) examine and review the societal responses and lessons learned of major disasters, and 4) interpret the geographic variability in disaster agents and impacts 

 

GEOGRAPHY 343-001: HUMAN IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT
MW 3:55pm – 5:10pm CALLCOTT 101
Dr. David Kneas (777-1308)
This course examines the relationship between society and the environment, that is, relations between culture, power, and environmental change. The course not only addresses themes of environmental degradation, but also considers the history and culture of environmental protection. In this regard, we will explore ideas of nature (from frontier wilderness to tropical Amazonia) and analyze the ways ideas of nature have influenced national identity, racial difference, and the branding and consumption of goods. In our approach to issues of environmental degradation we will examine the wider relations of power and economic production that drive environmental change, while critically examining popular framings of environmental problems. In situating issues of environmental degradation and protection in their wider political, cultural, and historical context, this course helps students develop and apply critical thinking skills towards the environment and their place within it. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 345-001: INTERPRETATION OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS 
T TH 10:05am – 11:20am CALLCOTT 004
Lab TH 10:05am – 11:20am CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Cuizhen Wang (777-5867)
This course introduces the basics of aerial photography including radiant energy, properties of the photographic image, photo geometry, photogrammetric measurement, photo acquisition, and interpretation of aerial photographs.  Emphasis is placed on practical training in an effort to make the student a competent user of air photos for a variety of geographic and multidisciplinary applications. No previous technical experience is needed. Basic knowledge of ArcGIS will help in lab exercises but is not required. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 347-001: WATER AS A RESOURCE
T TH 2:50pm – 4:05pm CALLCOTT 102
Dr. Jessica Barnes (777-9945)
This course examines the political, social, and cultural dimensions of water resources management. In the first part of the class we will explore the multiple functions that water fulfills as a resource. It quenches thirst, sustains crops, generates power, cools industry, carries waste, and maintains ecosystems.  For each of these topics we will look at the management issues, problems, and solutions that play out on individual, national, and global scales. The second part of the class will focus on the political dynamics of water distribution, access, and use. We will investigate questions of transboundary water management, climate change adaptation, water-related disasters, water governance, water scarcity, and the threat of water wars.

 

GEOGRAPHY 363-001-002: INTRO TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MW 10:50am – 11:40am CALLCOTT 003
Lab 1:  F 10:50am – 11:40am CALLCOTT 005
Lab II: F 1:10pm – 2:00pm CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Michael Hodgson (777-8976)
Geographic Information Systems represent a major advancement in computer handling of geographical data.  These systems are used extensively throughout all levels of government, private industry, and academia to provide support for spatial decision making and problem solving.  Principles and methods of Geographic Information Systems are presented with an emphasis on modeling the Earth and abstracting geographical data, collection of geographical data using modern techniques such as GPS, and analyzing patterns and spatial relationships.  
     Practical experience with GIS is provided during the lab exercises using a state-of-the-art GI System. Students are expected to be comfortable with the Microsoft windows interface.

 

GEOGRAPHY 399: INDEPENDENT STUDY
(Independent Study Contract Required and Department Permission)
Contact Geography Department for more information: 777-5234 / CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 498: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(Department Permission Required)
Contact Geography Department for more information: 777-5234 / CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 499: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
(Department Permission)
Contact Geography Department for more information: 777-5234 / CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 512-001: MIGRATION AND GLOBALIZATION
T TH 10:05am-11:20am CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Caroline Nagel (777-4970)
Migration has been one of the most significant forces shaping modern societies.  Today, no region or country is isolated from the changes wrought by population movement. The scale and diversity of migration flows can be linked to changing patterns of global integration.  But migration is not simply an outcome of globalization; instead migration actively creates ‘the global’ by forging expansive networks of people, commodities, cultures, and political action.  In this course, we will explore historical and contemporary processes driving migration flows, the impacts of migration on places of origin and destinations, and the multiple linkages that exist between migrants and their places of origin.  We will also give special attention to border politics, citizenship and integration policies, gender and migration, and shifting patterns of immigrant settlement.

 

GEOGRAPHY 535-001: HAZARDS ANALYSIS AND PLANNING
M 3:55pm – 5:10pm CALLCOTT 202
Lab: W 3:55pm – 5:10pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. Susan Cutter (777-1590)
Dr. Chris Emrich (777-1591)
Examination of the geo-spatial aspects of hazards analysis and planning with specific reference to disaster preparedness, recovery, mitigation, and resilience. This course 1) provides a historical overview of hazards assessment and planning within the United States including the legal frameworks such as the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 and its amendments; 2) introduces the conceptual and theoretical background to hazards analysis including scale, geospatial models, and metrics for vulnerability and resilience; 3) introduces analytical tools used in hazards and vulnerability assessments; and 4) illustrates the application of existing hazards research on planning and analysis into contemporary practice.  Using a combination of learning styles ranging from reading, lectures, and in class discussions to more active engagement with online discussions, blogs, GIS labs, and hands-on exercises, the course illustrates how the principles of the geographical sciences tailored to hazards analysis are translated into useful information for practitioners.  Students should already have some of the fundamental knowledge and basic introductory background in hazards and in geographic information systems.  
     By the end of the semester students should be able to: 1) demonstrate the ability to think spatially, analyze hazards data, and provide a place-based hazard assessment for a community, county, state, or region, 2) understand the geographical dimensions and information requirements for preparedness, mitigation, and recovery, 3) understand limitations in measuring hazards and vulnerability at different spatial scales, 4) critically evaluate hazard assessment methodologies including limitations in models and in available data streams, and 5) spatially represent hazards, vulnerability, and resilience at local to national scales. 
     Prerequisites: GEOG 363 and 530, or equivalents; or permission of the instructor

 

GEOGRAPHY 549-001: WATER AND WATERSHEDS
T TH 2:50pm – 4:05pm CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Allan James (777-6117)
This course examines watersheds from a geographic perspective.  The focus is on physical aspects of environmental systems that generate and receive surface water and sediment and on interactions with humans.  Students will learn about physical hydrology, water quality, and pollution.  Hydrology emphasizes surface-water processes of runoff generation, flow conveyance, storm hydrographs, and effects of urbanization.  Water quality covers the constituents in water and measurement methods.  NPS pollution includes erosion and sedimentation processes. Lab, field, and geospatial methods will be introduced.  Examples and projects will be drawn from Rocky Branch Watershed that drains Five Points and most of the USC campus.   This course is recommended for Earth science students and environmental resources managers because it develops a broad, intuitive, and analytical understanding of processes interacting within watersheds.

 

GEOGRAPHY 563-001: ADVANCED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
T TH 11:40am – 12:55pm CALLCOTT 003
Lab: TH 11:40am – 12:55pm CALLCOTT 005
Dr. Diansheng Guo (777-2989)
This course covers the technical and conceptual bases of Geographic Information Systems.  This includes how GIS is used to perform spatial analysis, analysis of networks, incorporation of remote sensing data, and three-dimensional surfaces.  An integral part of this course is the extensive experience students gain using an operational geographic information system.  This experience allows the exploration of theoretical topics presented as well as examination and formulation of real-world applications areas as diverse as real estate, crime analysis, environmental protection.

 

Geography 566-001: Social Aspects of Environmental Planning and Management
MW 2:20pm – 3:35pm CALLCOTT 112
Dr. Kirstin Dow (777-2482)
This course will cover the processes of climate adaptation planning and management from central concepts in adaptation to issues such as projecting impacts, vulnerability assessment, coping with uncertainty, and decision making.  We will consider case studies that reveal the diverse issues, approaches, and challenges From New York City, Paris, London, and Venice to Kivalina in Northwest Alaska, South Africa, coastal Bangladesh, the Mekong Delta, and other communities large and small, more and less affluent.

 

GEOGRAPHY 571-001: MICROCLIMATOLOGY
T TH 1:15pm – 2:30pm CALLCOTT 101
Lab: TH 1:15pm – 2:30pm CALLCOTT 302
Dr. April Hiscox (777-6604)
This course examines the interactions between the earth’s surface and the lower atmosphere. The focus on the course is the description of transport processes of energy and mass in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. Processes discussed with include radiation, turbulence, soil heat fluxes, momentum transfer, latent and sensible heat fluxes, moisture fluxes and evaporation. Students will work with microclimatic data and instrumentation. After completion of this course, students will understand the scientific theory governing land-atmosphere interactions, as well as the role these small scale processes play in the earth’s climate system. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 590-001: BEACHES-DUNES INTERACTIONS
Cross-listed Course: MSCI 590 Prerequisites: Minimum Junior standing required
T TH 11:40–12:55pm CALLCOTT 101
Dr. Jean Taylor Ellis (777-1593)
The purpose of the course is for students to acquire an appreciation of the influence of wind on coastal systems. The course will be structured around the concept of beach-dune interactions. From a marine perspective, wind is the generating force of a majority of waves, especially those found along the South Carolina coast. Waves therefore influence seashore currents, sediment transport, and aquatic bedforms. Additionally, waves will influence beach swash dynamics and classifications. From a terrestrial perspective, wind drives aeolian transport processes, which in turn creates and modifies coastal dune systems. This course will investigate concepts from a field-based process geomorphology perspective, one that will also include time series analysis of data. Graduate students in GEOG or MSCI 590 will have additional assignments to earn graduate credit. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 595-001: INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY
for Graduate Credit
(*A Signed Internship Contract Required and Approved by the Instructor)
Dr. Caroline Nagel (777-4970) CALLCOTT 106
The internship in geography helps students acquire valuable "on the job" experience and develop marketable job skills as well as learn about employment opportunities and requirements.  Students serve as interns with cooperating government agencies, or commercial and nonprofit businesses.  A special effort is made to assign each intern to a position compatible with his/her interests, abilities, and career aspirations.  The course is graded on a pass/not pass basis.  Grades are determined by the Internship Director in consultation with supervisory personnel in cooperating agencies.  Grades are based on the performance of internship duties and the preparation of an internship summary report.

 

GEOGRAPHY 595-002: INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY
for Undergraduate Credit
(*A Signed Internship Contract Required and Approved by the Instructor)
Dr. Amy Mills (777-5234) CALLCOTT 127
The internship in geography helps students acquire valuable "on the job" experience and develop marketable job skills as well as learn about employment opportunities and requirements.  Students serve as interns with cooperating government agencies, or commercial and nonprofit businesses.  A special effort is made to assign each intern to a position compatible with his/her interests, abilities, and career aspirations.  The course is graded on a pass/not pass basis.  Grades are determined by the Internship Director in consultation with supervisory personnel in cooperating agencies.  Grades are based on the performance of internship duties and the preparation of an internship summary report.

 

GEOGRAPHY 705: DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN GEOGRAPH
(Contract Required and Approved by Instructor)
Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.
Department Permission
(777-5234) CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 706: SELECTED TOPICS IN CART/RS
(Contract Required and Approved by Instructor)Directed research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.
Department Permission
(777-5234) CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 731-001: SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN GEOGRAPHY
W 1:10pm – 3:40pm CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Diansheng Guo (777-2989)
This seminar introduces contemporary quantitative analysis methods in geography, concentrating on methods for analyzing geographic phenomena represented by spatial, temporal, and multivariate data. The course will cover: (1) multivariate methods using the Generalized Linear Model (GLM), including those used for pattern searching (such as Principal Components Analysis) and those used for prediction (such as multivariate regression); (2) non-linear methods for prediction (such as decision trees, neural networks) and clustering (such as self-organizing maps, hierarchical clustering,); and (3) space-time scan statics and spatial dependence analysis methods. Students learn to use these methods from lectures, discussion, and practical application to their own data sets.

 

GEOGRAPHY 740-001 RESEARCH TRENDS IN GEOGRAPHY
T 2:50pm – 5:20p.m. CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Amy Mills (777-5688)
Seminar in research in geography, focusing on refining research questions and writing research proposals.    For more information, contact Dr. Amy Mills at amills@mailbox.sc.edu.

 

GEOGRAPHY 747-001: SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
T TH 11:40am – 12:55pm CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Jean Taylor Ellis (777-1593)
This is a seminar to investigate the systems and processes on Earth’s surface, with particular focus on the hydrodynamic and aerodynamic components of coastal systems.  Students will acquire an appreciation of the influence of wind on coastal systems. The course will be structured around the concept of beach-dune interactions. From a marine perspective, wind is the generating force of a majority of waves, especially those found along the South Carolina coast. Waves therefore influence neashore currents, sediment transport, and aquatic bedforms. Additionally, waves will influence beach swash dynamics and classifications. From a terrestrial perspective, wind drives aeolian transport processes, which in turn creates and modifies coastal dune systems. This course will investigate concepts from a field-based process geomorphology perspective, one that will also include time series analysis of data. 

 

GEOGRAPHY 751-001: DIGITAL TECHNIQUES OF REMOTE SENSING
T TH 1:15pm – 2:30pm CALLCOTT 004
Lab T 1:15pm – 2:30pm 005
Dr. Cuizhen Wang (777-5867)
This course covers detailed techniques of computer-assisted digital image processing (DIP), information extraction and land use/land cover mapping from satellite imagery. Topics include: Image pre-process (radiometric/atmospheric/geometric correction);  spatial and spectral transformation;  land use/land cover classification, and change detection. Lab exercises heavily rely on the Erdas/Imagine in computer labs. Each student is responsible for a final project to solve specific research problems using the DIP techniques discussed in this course.  

 

GEOGRAPHY 799: THESIS PREPARATION
(Approved by Instructor)
Thesis Preparation research topics individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.
Department Permission
(777-5234) CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 805: DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION PROCESSING
(Approved by Instructor)
Directed research topics in geographical information processing to be individually supervised by graduate faculty. 
Department Permission
(777-5234) CALLCOTT 127

 

GEOGRAPHY 847-001: ADVANCED SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY:  APPROACHES AND APPLICATIONS IN SPECIES DISTRIBUTION MODELING AND MAPPING
F 9:30am – 12:00pm CALLCOTT 112
Dr. John Kupfer (777-6739)
In recent years, predictive modeling of species distributions has become an important tool for addressing various issues in ecology, biogeography, and evolution, including the identification and protection of habitat for threatened and endangered species, management of non-native species, and climate change research. Most modeling approaches developed for predicting plant or animal species distributions have their roots in quantifying species–environment relationships and extrapolating those relationships in space through the use of GIS. Recent developments in spatial distribution models (SDMs) allow us to forecast potential anthropogenic effects on patterns of biodiversity at different spatial scales. For the first half of the semester, we will examine commonly used SDM methods. The second half of the semester will hen focus on model applications, giving students the opportunity to focus on a specific topic of choice. Sample topics that could be covered include the use of SDMs for the assessment of climate change impacts, conservation management issues, non-native species invasions and the development of novel modeling methods, including the linkage of SDM’s and population models or the use of hierarchial Bayesian models for species modeling. This seminar is open to both masters and Ph.D. students, but students should have taken a basic course in statistics and have a working knowledge of correlation and regression.

 

GEOGRAPHY 863-001: ADVANCED SEMINAR IN GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
M 1:30pm – 3:40pm CALLCOTT 228
Dr. Michael Hodgson (777-8976)
A research seminar in which students conduct a detailed analysis of specific aspects of geographical data handling. This will include the design, implementation, and management of an operational geographical information system. Please contact Dr. Michael Hodgson at hodgsonm@mailbox.sc.edu for a detailed course description.

 

GEOGRAPHY 899: DISSERTATION PREPARATION
(Approved by Instructor) 
Dissertation Preparation research topic is individually assigned and supervised by graduate faculty.
Department Permission
(777-5234) CALLCOTT 127