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College of Arts & Sciences
Jewish Studies Program


2011 Solomon-Tenenbaum Lectureship

Solomon-Tenenbaum Lecture 2011


Speaker

Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky, Ph.D.

 

Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies
Director, Louis Finkelstein Institute for Religious and Social Studies
Jewish Theological Seminary

September 13, 2011

LECTURE:
"Sage Tales: The Power of Rabbinic Story and What it Can Teach Us Today"
8:00 p.m.
Campus Room at Capstone House, USC Columbia
*Free and Open to the Public*

&

SYMPOSIUM:
"On the academic study of the ancient story"
1:30 - 2:45 p.m.
Rutledge Chapel on the Horseshoe
*Free and Open to the Public*

Symposium
Panelists:

Federica K. Clementi
Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies, English, 
and Comparative Literature, 
University of South Carolina
"Holocaust and myth: How tales help us speak"

 

Michael Gibbs Hill
Assistant Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature, 
University of South Carolina
"Ancient tales and modern Chinese thought"

 

Paul Allen Miller
Carolina Distinguished Professor of Classics, 
University of South Carolina
"Stories in Plato and Cicero:
Narrative goes where philosophy only dreams"

 

Gordon D. Newby
Professor of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, 
Emory University
"Tafsîr Isra'îliyât and Midrash:
A shared tradition in Islam and Judaism"

 

Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky
Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies, 
Jewish Theological Seminary
"The turn from history to literature
and the end of Wissenschaft des Judentums"

Moderator:

Elise Blackwell
Novelist & Director of the MFA Program in English, 
University of South Carolina

 

Link to symposium program

Lecture Description:
Sage Tales: The Power of Rabbinic Story and what it can teach us today: 
Great stories have the power to draw the heart. But certain stories have the power to draw the heart to God and awaken the better angels of our nature. Such are the classic tales of the Rabbis of the Talmud-colorful, quirky yarns that tug at our heartstrings and test our values, ethics, morality, and imaginations. Rabbi Prof. Visotzky draws on four decades of telling and teaching these legends in order to unlock their wisdom for the contemporary heart. He introduces us to the cast of characters, explains their motivations, and provides the historical background needed to penetrate the wise lessons often hidden within these unusual narratives. In learning how and why these old-told tales were spun, we will discover how they continue to hold value for our contemporary lives.

Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky, Guest Lecturer: 
Dr. Burton L. Visotzky, is Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies and director of the Louis Finkelstein Institute for Religious and Social Studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary, where he joined the faculty upon his ordination as rabbi in 1977. Visotzky has served as visiting faculty at Oxford, Cambridge, the Russian State University of the Humanities in Moscow, Princeton University, and the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He works in Jewish-Christian-Muslim dialogue in the U.S. and abroad, meeting with religious leaders in Warsaw, Rome, Doha, Cairo, and Madrid, among other places. He appears frequently on radio and television. Prof. Visotzky is the author of over 100 articles and ten books; most recently SAGE TALES; Wisdom and Wonder from the Rabbis of the Talmud (Jewish Lights, 2011).

More information on Rabbi Burton Visotzky. click on this link Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky,