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College of Arts & Sciences
Linguistics Program


Psycholinguistics and Cognitive and Formal Linguistics

M.A. and Ph.D. Concentrations

The Linguistics Program at the University of South Carolina offers M.A. and Ph.D. concentrations in psycholinguistics and in cognitive and formal approaches to linguistics. We welcome you to explore these concentrations.

What kind of training do students receive?
Who are the faculty in these concentrations?
What graduate courses have we recently offered? 
What dissertation projects have our students completed?
Who are some of our other faculty interested in these areas?
What related graduate courses do we list in the Bulletin?


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What kind of training do students receive?

The faculty members who teach in these concentrations teach graduate courses in syntax, semantics, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, cognitive science, philosophy of language, psychology of language, and in experimental methods. Our students have the opportunity to become familiar with a variety of methodological approaches: theoretical, experimental (including behavioral, eye tracking, and neuroimaging), and corpus-based analysis. In particular, students have the opportunity to work in the labs housed at the Institute of Mind and Brain that host state-of-the-art equipment for eye tracking, EEG/ERP, and behavioral testing.

The Linguistics Program requires some training in formal linguistics from all its doctoral students and offers courses in other concentrations, such as Sociolinguistics, Linguistic Anthropology, Second Language Acquisition/TESOL, and Historical Linguistics. Thus students have opportunities to become well versed in the broad range of linguistic subfields covered by our sixteen-person Linguistics Program faculty.


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Who are the faculty in these concentrations?

A range of core and affliated faculty members have taught courses related to Psycholinguistics and Cognitive and Formal Linguistics. (See table below for a complete list of faculty with interests in these concentrations.) The following faculty members most regularly teach courses in these areas.

  • Amit Almor (Ph.D. in Cognitive Science, Brown University) Psycholinguistics, spoken and written language processing, reference processing, attention and language, space and language, neuroimaging
  • Anne Bezuidenhout (Ph.D. in Philosophy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) Philosophy of language, semantics, pragmatics, experimental approaches to semantics and pragmatics
  • Stan Dubinsky (Ph.D. in Linguistics, Cornell University) Syntax, semantics, morphology, language rights, and linguistic theory
  • Robin Morris (Ph.D. in Psychology, University of Massachusetts) Psycholinguistics, language processing in reading, vocabulary acquisition, eye movement monitoring
  • Mila Tasseva-Kurktchieva (Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of South Carolina) SLA theories, generative SLA, L2 processing, comprehension and production in L2, syntactic theory, linguistic theory

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What graduate courses have we recently offered?

Bayesian Models of Language, Mind and Brain Seminar 
Brain and Reading
Cognitive Psychology Laboratory
Evolution of Linguistic Theory, Practice, and Methods
Formal Semantics
Introduction to Semantics & Pragmatics
Introduction to Syntax
Language, Space, and Brain Seminar
Philosophy of Language
Psychology of Language
Psychology of Reading
Research Methods in Digital Humanities
Syntactic Theory


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What dissertation projects have our students completed?


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All faculty with Psycholinguistics and Cognitive and Formal Linguistics as an area of interest

Amit Almor

Associate Professor (Psychology)

Ph.D., Brown University, 1995

Psycholinguistics, spoken and written language processing, reference processing, attention and language, space and language, neuroimaging

Anne Bezuidenhout

Professor (Philosophy)

Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1990

Philosophy of language, semantics, pragmatics, experimental approaches to semantics and pragmatics

Stanley Dubinsky

Professor (English)
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1985 

Syntax, semantics, morphology, language rights, and linguistic theory

Robin Morris

Professor (Psychology) 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1990

 
Psycholinguistics, language processing in reading, vocabulary acquisition, eye movement monitoring

Mila Tasseva-Kurktchieva

Program Director

Research Associate Professor (Linguistics)
Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 2006 

SLA theories, generative SLA, L2 processing, comprehension and production in L2, syntactic theory, linguistic theory

Dirk den Ouden

(Consulting Faculty)
Associate Professor; Director, Neurolinguistics Laboratory (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Ph.D., University of Groningen (The Netherlands), 2002 

Neural correlates of language representation and use; aphasia, stroke; phonology, apraxia of speech; syntax, verbs, sentence production/processing; functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); electroencephalograhy (EEG); transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), High-Definition transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (HD-tDCS)

Dan Fogerty

(Consulting Faculty)
Assistant Professor (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Ph.D., Indiana University, (Majors: Speech and Hearing Science, Cognitive Science), 2010

Acoustics, phonetics, speech perception, cognitive hearing science




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Graduate Courses in Psycholinguistics and Cognitive and Formal Linguistics listed in the Bulletin

LING 567 - Psychology of Language

Credits: 3 

Theories of speech perception, lingustic theories of syntax and semantics, the brain mechanisms underlying language, the development of language in children, and the role of language in thought.

Equivalent Course PSYC 506

LING 565 Philosophy of Language 

Credits: 3 

An examination of concepts and problems such as meaning, reference, analyticity, definition, and the relation between logic and philosophy. 

LING 570 Introduction to Language Development [= COMD 570]

Credits: 3 

The language acquisition process in normal children, including the development of semantics, morphology, syntax, phonology, and pragmatics; American dialects and bilingualism.

LING 765 Studies in Philosophy of Language 

Credits: 3

An examination of concepts and problems such as meaning, reference, analyticity, and translational indeterminacy; evaluation of accounts of speech acts, the semantics of propositional attitudes, and metaphor and other pragmatic phenomena.

LING 805 - Psychology of Reading

Credits: 3 

Focuses on meaning and specifically how conceptual and semantic knowledge is represented and processed in the mind and brain. Reviews research from philosophy, linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience to understand current views of how conceptual and semantic information is organized and used in language processing. LING 805-P/PSYC

LING 805-P: Meaning in the Brain and Mind

Credits: 3 

Focuses on meaning and specifically how conceptual and semantic knowledge is represented and processed in the mind and brain. We will review research from philosophy, linguistics, psychology, and neuroscience to understand current views of how conceptual and semantic information is organized and used in language processing.

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