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College of Arts & Sciences
Linguistics Program


Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

Fall 2017: Undergraduate and Graduate Courses

 Course times and instructors subject to change. Master Schedule has the most up-to-date information.

 

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Course Descriptions

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Enrollments for Individual Sections

LING 101

Linguistics I: Introduction to Language

Satisfies the Global/Social Science (GSS) Carolina Core requirement

TR 10:05 - 11:20

Chun

 

LING 240

Language Conflict and Language Rights

Satisfies the Values, Ethics, and Social Responsibility (VSR) Carolina Core Requirement

TR 11:40 - 12:55

MW 5:30 - 6:45 

Dubinsky

TBA

 

LING 300

Introduction to Language Sciences

(3 Sections)

(Crosslists: ANTH 373/PSYC 470)

(SCHC Students Only for Morris section)

MWF 10:50 - 11:40 
 

TR 6:00 - 7:15
  

TR 11:40 - 12:55

Staff

Staff

Morris

ANTH 373
PSYC 470

ANTH 373
PSYC 470

ANTH 373
PSYC 470

LING 301

The English Language

(Two Sections) (Crosslist: ENGL 389)

MW 1:00 - 2:15

MW 3:55 - 5:10

Disterheft

Disterheft

ENGL 389

ENGL 389

LING 305

Language and Racism

(Crosslists: ENGL 439/ANTH 391)

TR 2:50 - 4:05

Chun

ENGL 439

ANTH 391

LING 314

Spanish Phonetics & Pronunciation

(Crosslist: SPAN 317)

TR 11:40-12:55

Holt

SPAN 317

LING 340

Language, Culture & Society

(Crosslist: ANTH 355)

MWF 1:10-2:00

Reynolds

ANTH 355

LING 405

Teach English Abroad

(Crosslist: ENGL 439/ANTH 391)

MW 3:55-5:10

Rowe

ENGL 439

ANTH 391

LING 421

English Grammar

(Crosslist: ENGL 450)

TR 10:05 - 11:20

Liu, Q.

ENGL 450

LING 442

African American English

(SCHC Students Only)

(Crosslist: AFAM 442/ANTH 442/ENGL 457; Meets with LING 805)

MW 2:20 - 3:35

Weldon

AFAM 442

ANTH 442

ENGL 457

LING 503

Introduction to German Linguistics

(Crosslist: GERM 515)

TR 1:15 - 2:30

Goblirsch

GERM 515

LING 504

Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

(Crosslist: SPAN 515)

TR 2:50 - 4: 05

Moreno

SPAN 515

LING 565

Philosophy of Language

(Crosslist: PHIL 517)

TR 11:40 - 12:55

Bezuidenhout

PHIL 517

LING 570

Introduction to Language Development

(Crosslist: PSYC 589)

TR 1:15 - 2:30

Tasseva

PSYC 589

LING 701

Quantitative Approaches to Linguistic Analysis

Satisfies the doctoral research methods requirement

T 4:25 - 7:00

Dalola

 

LING 711

Phonological Theory

Satisfies the doctoral core requirement

TR 10:05 - 11:20

Holt

 

LING 720

Introduction to Syntax

Core requirement for MA and PhD degrees

TR 2:50 - 4:05

Tasseva

 

LING 739

The Evolution of Linguistic Theory, Practice and Methods

TR 2:50 - 4:05

Dubinsky

 

LING 795

Principles & Strategies for Teaching ESOL

Core requirement for the TESOL certificate, EFL and K-12 tracks

TR 4:25 - 5:40

Liu, Q.

 

LING 805

African American English

(Meets With LING 442/AFAM 442/ANTH 442/ENGL 457)

MW 2:20 - 3:35

Weldon

 

LING 890

Seminar in Language Acquisition: L2 Phonology

MW 2:20 - 3:35

Liu, J.

 

PSYC 822

Seminar in Cognitive Psychology

F 9:00 - 11:45

Almor

 

EDRD 796

Teaching Reading/Writing

W 4:40 - 7:25

Lopez-Robertson

 

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LING 101: LINGUISTICS I: INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE

TR 10:05 – 11:20; CHUN

SATISFIES GLOBAL/SOCIAL SCIENCE (GSS) CAROLINA CORE REQUIREMENT

This course introduces students to contemporary issues in the field of linguistics by focusing on the sociocultural and cognitive-behavioral dimensions of language. We will explore how languages are defined (What is language? Do non-human animals use language? Is sign language a real language?), how ways of speaking differ (Who speaks Standard English? Why do some speakers sound more intelligent and more beautiful than others? What does our speech say about who we are?), how we learn language (Do we need to teach children how to speak? Why is it so hard to learn a second language?), how language is represented in the brain (Which parts of our brain are devoted to words and which parts to grammar? How do we process language?), and why languages matter in our world (How can we use language strategically? Why should they be saved?).

            By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify, evaluate, and challenge common linguistic misconceptions regarding what language is, how languages are learned, and how different social groups speak.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the diversity of the world’s languages and of the human experiences shaped by these languages.
  • Critically evaluate how language relates to social value, prejudice, and worldview.
  • Engage in critical, scientific, and comparative analyses of language structures and conventions across diverse languages and dialects.
  • Define basic theoretical concepts in sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics.

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LING 240: LANGUAGE CONFLICT AND LANGUAGE RIGHTS

TR 11:40 – 12:55; DUBINSKY

MW 5:30 - 6:45; TBA

SATISFIES VSR VALUES, ETHICS, AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CAROLINA CORE REQUIREMENT

Whether arising though conquest and colonization, immigration, enslavement, or the creation of a political state that ignores "natural" ethnic territories, linguistic minorities have existed at least since the dawn of history. Virtually without exception, where there exists a linguistic minority, there exist issues related to the rights of the minority to use its language freely and without prejudice. In this course, Language Conflict and Language Rights, we will explore the issues surrounding linguistic human rights, the fundamental right to use one's language and the efforts that have been made to both secure those rights and deny them through official legislation and unofficial actions. Examples will be drawn from state history, national issues, and international issues.

The overall goal of the course is to examine the issues surrounding language rights and how these are integral to human rights in general and an individual's definition of personal and cultural identity. We will do this by examining a variety of case studies of the abridgment of language rights locally, nationally, and internationally. As a backdrop to this, we will first explore a number of facets of language, including some basic facts about language; the role of language in defining one's identity, language and culture, dialects, language attitudes, bilingualism, second language acquisition, and others.

This course will define the concept of language rights from a linguistic perspective, will cover language and nationalism with special reference to the situation in the United States, will survey geographically and linguistically disparate language rights cases, will connect all this to issues of language vitality and revival, and will consider the ramifications of language rights to language planning.

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LING 300/ANTH 373/PSYC 470: INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE SCIENCES (three sections)

MWF 10:50 - 11:40; STAFF

TR 6:00-7:15; STAFF

TR 11:40 – 12:55; (SCHC students only); MORRIS

Linguistics is roughly divided into two subfields- language and the brain, and language and society.   The first half of this course, after establishing the definition and the nature of human language, will focus on how languages are done in the brains of their speakers.   We will be introduced to phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of human languages using data from a variety of languages, including English.   In the second half of the class, we will be focusing on aspects of language use: discourse analysis, stylistics, child and adult language acquisition, sociolinguistics, dialectology, and the political economy of languages in today’s world.  Upon completing this class, students will have been exposed to the most important aspects of all of these subfields of linguistics, and be able to conduct their own analyses on language as they encounter it in the world.

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LING 301/ENGL 389:  THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (two sections)          

MW 1:00 – 2:15; DISTERHEFT

MW 3:55 – 5:10; DISTERHEFT

This course introduces students to the field of linguistics with an emphasis on the English language. It will provide a broad survey of various aspects of language structure and language use in order to develop analytical skills that are useful to both linguists and non-linguists interested in language issues. Students will learn how to analyze and describe languages, apply basic analytical techniques to language data, understand what we know when we "know" a language, and explore what language reveals about human beings, their histories, and their cultures.

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LING 305/ENGL 439/ANTH 391:  LANGUAGE AND RACISM

TR 2:50 - 4:05; CHUN

This course explores the intersection of language, race, and power; it examines this intersection by using conceptual and methodological tools of linguistics and anthropology. Drawing from cases primarily involve the English language or communities in the United States, this course will cover the following topics: (1) LINGUISTIC PROFILING: how we sometimes use language to identify a speaker’s race and whether such profiling is racist; (2) CROSS-RACIAL APPROPRIATION: why we sometimes “borrow” the language of racial groups to which we do not belong; (3) RACIAL MOCKERY: how we perform linguistic caricatures of racial speakers; (4) ETHNIC SLURS: how words referring to racial groups can convey derogatory meanings; (5) EUPHEMISMS: whether we become “colorblind” by replacing explicit racial terms with terms such as “immigrant” or “urban”; (6) REAPPROPRIATION: how and whether ethnic slurs can become positive in-group terms; (7) MAINSTREAM U.S. STANDARD: whether the different statuses of black and white varieties in contexts of U.S. media and education reproduce racial hierarchies; (8) IDEOLOGIES OF RACISM: what cultural assumptions underlie our accusations of certain speech acts as racist or our denials of other acts as non-racist; and (9) ANTI-RACIST STRATEGIES: how we can use language to counter racist acts and beliefs.

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LING 314/SPAN 317:  SPANISH PHONETICS & PRONUNCIATION

TR 11:40-12:55; HOLT

(taught in Spanish)

Analysis of and practice in pronunciation, listening comprehension and dialect recognition based on the study of the speech sounds, combinations, patterns, and processes of Spanish phonetics and phonology.

Objectives: To analyze and practice pronunciation and listening comprehension.
Learning the sound system of Spanish well is typically quite difficult for most English-speaking students. This course is designed to help you master Spanish pronunciation, and to help in this aim you will be exposed to the area of linguistics called phonetics, the study of speech sounds, and to phonology, how we understand the sounds of our language and the combinations they form. We will see that the same or similar sounds may be interpreted differently in English and Spanish, and throughout this course we will contrast these two languages. In this course we will be concerned primarily with articulatory phonetics, the description of how sounds are produced in the mouth and throat. We will describe sounds by their place and manner of articulation and practice phonetic transcription (both broad and narrow) of the major dialects of Spanish using the set of symbols employed to represent speech sounds, the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). We will also see how these sounds interact in Spanish (and English) to form the sound system of the language. Armed with this knowledge and practicing these sounds, your pronunciation will improve dramatically, including that of such obvious markers of nonnative status as the pronunciation of vowels, rr and other difficult sounds for the English speaker; and you will more easily recognize and identify different accents and dialects. Additionally, we will analyze and come to understand the systems of spelling and accents in Spanish, which are actually valuable tools to the learner in knowing how to speak and write correctly.

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LING 340/ANTH 355: LANGUAGE, CULTURE & SOCIETY

MWF 1:10-2:00; REYNOLDS

In this introductory course we will be exploring the relationship between language, culture, and communication as it has been theorized and analyzed within linguistic anthropology, one of the four main fields of American Anthropology. You will learn about what scholars have had to say on the subject, past and present, as well as gain hands-on-experience in what linguistic anthropologists actually do. I encourage you to bring your questions and queries to class and share them with your peers and me as we problematize the naturalized, and seemingly transparent systems of communication that shape our lives.

Upon completion of Anthropology 355/Linguistics 340 students should be able to:

1)         Identify and apply basic concepts and terminology from linguistic anthropology;

2)         Distinguish different units and levels of linguistic and discourse structure;

3)         Recognize the ways language and culture are interdependent.

4)         Understand some of the methods used in and the goals of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguistics.

5)         Trace the historical trajectory of the discipline of linguistic anthropology as well as the different emphases and approaches to the study of language and culture;

6)         Develop critical thinking skills that will facilitate the interpretation of professional publications;

7)         Apply basic methods in linguistic anthropological research both short exercises and a group project that will allow them to synthesize research findings, develop and argument in accordance with linguistic anthropological approaches, and employ anthropological writing conventions.

Audience:  Undergraduate students, no prerequisite, not limited to anthropology / linguistics.

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LING 405/ENGL 439/ANTH 391: TEACH ENGLISH ABROAD

MW 3:55-5:10; ROWE

You will work with English as a second language learners and veteran teachers here at USC. You will have hands-on experiences while you develop your knowledge and skills for teaching and global travel. Please join us as we explore the excellent opportunities of English Language Teaching! There are no prerequisites for this course.

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LING 421/ENGL 450:  ENGLISH GRAMMAR          

TR 10:05 – 11:20; LIU

An intensive survey of English grammar: sentence structure, the verbal system, discourse, and transformations. Also discussed are semantics, social restrictions on grammar and usage, histories of various constructions, etc. Please read Chapter 1 of the textbook before the first class meeting. One midterm, final exam, frequent homework assignments.

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LING 442/AFAM 442/ANTH 442/ENGL 457/LING 805: AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH

MW 2:20 – 3:35; WELDON

(SCHC Students Only)

This course is designed to introduce students to the structure, history, and use of the distinctive varieties of English used by and among many African Americans in the U.S. In this course, we will examine some of the linguistic features that distinguish African-American English (AAE) from other varieties of American English. We will consider theories regarding the history and emergence of AAE. We will look at the representation of AAE in literature. We will examine the structure and function of various expressive speech events in the African-American speech community. And we will consider attitudinal issues regarding the use of AAE, especially as they relate to education and the acquisition of Standard English.

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LING 472/FORL 472:  TECHNOLOGY FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

T 3:05 – 5:45; DUCATE

Meets with FORL 772/LING 772

This course will acquaint students with the principles and practices concerning the use of technology in foreign language education. Its main focus will be to explore the connection between Second Language Acquisition theories and the implementation of current technologies with a focus on web 2.0 tools. Specifically, we will examine ways in which technology can be used to support the development of communicative competence as learners engage in the process of acquiring another language. Open to students of any specialization, this course aims to cover the essentials that language educators need in the field of second language education.

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LING 503/GERM 515:  INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LINGUISTICS

TR 1:15 – 2:30; GOBLIRSCH

The course simultaneously presents an introduction to the concepts of general linguistics and a discussion of the structure of modern German. Phonetics, phonology, morphology, orthography, syntax, semantics, etymology, and pragmatics will be treated. There will also be some attention to German language variation. Although the language of the course is English, knowledge of German is assumed.

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LING 504/SPAN 515:  INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LINGUISTICS

TR 2:50 – 4: 05; MORENO

(taught in Spanish)

El objetivo principal de este curso es una comprensión lo más amplia posible del lenguaje humano: qué es, para qué lo usamos y cómo funciona. Estas preguntas quizá parezcan triviales ya que todos sabemos cómo usar el lenguaje y cómo hacerlo funcionar. Sin embargo, a lo largo de este curso descubrirán que hay una gran diferencia entre saber hacer funcionar el lenguaje y saber cómo funciona.

Algunas de las preguntas que trataremos son: ¿Qué significa “saber una lengua”? ¿Qué significa “saber español”? ¿En qué difiere el español de las otras lenguas? ¿En qué se parece? ¿Debemos seguir hablando de una lengua, “el español”, o de varios “españoles”? Este curso presentará a los estudiantes las diferentes áreas en que está dividida la lingüística española y los problemas de los que se ocupa cada área.

Al analizar las estructuras gramaticales del español (en el sentido más amplio de este término) y hacer comparaciones con las del inglés, lograremos una mayor comprensión de cómo funciona la lengua española (y en menor grado, el inglés), y como consecuencia podremos anticipar mejor las preguntas de nuestros alumnos y contestarlas con precisión, exactitud y confianza.

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LING 565/PHIL 515: PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

TR 11:40 – 12:55; BEZUIDENHOUT

This course is structured around some central questions of concern to philosophers of language and linguists who work in semantics and pragmatics. We will explore issues, theories and debates such as:

  • the relation between words and things and the theories of reference that have been proposed to explain this relation
  • the relation between natural languages and logic and the role of logic in modeling natural language meaning and reference
  • the role of speaker intentions in accounting for meaning and reference
  • the differences between asserting, implicating, and presupposing something
  • the theory of speech acts and Grice’s theory of conversational implicature
  • the knowledge and use of language and the role that context plays in utterance comprehension and production

Prescribed Text for the Course: Kemp, G. (2013). What is this Thing Called Philosophy of Language? Routledge. ISBN-13: 9780415517843. Some additional readings for the course are taken from other sources. Electronic versions of these additional papers will be made available via the Blackboard web site for this course.

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LING 570/PSYC 589: LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

TR 1:15 – 2:30; TASSEVA

(restricted to SCHC and graduate students)

This course covers the language development, both monolingual and bilingual from birth to early elementary school years. We will take a psycholinguistics perspective to the issue and explore avenues in which monolingualism and bilingualism are the same, yet take differential developmental paths and lead to more or less different outcomes.

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LING 701: QUANTITATIVE APPROACHES TO LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS

T 4:25 – 7:00; DALOLA

Satisfies a doctoral research methods requirement

Modern linguistic research increasingly involves quantitative analysis to count or measure various aspects of linguistic behavior in order to answer questions about the way language works. This course will guide students through the description, visualization and basic statistical analysis of both discrete and continuous linguistic data using R, an open-source statistical software environment. Popular quantitative methods from various linguistic subfields will be discussed and applied across subdisciplines.

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LING 711: PHONOLOGICAL THEORY

TR 10:05 – 11:20; HOLT

Satisfies the doctoral core course requirement

The objective of this course is to prepare students to read current phonological literature and to carry out research on phonological phenomena, in light of the current dominant paradigm, Optimality Theory. In particular, we consider OT approaches to phonological representations and alternations to the analysis of segments, syllables and prosody. Further, we will apply current theory to the students’ own interests/specializations (first and/or second language acquisition, historical change, sociolinguistics, etc.).

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LING 720: INTRODUCTION TO SYNTAX

TR 2:50 – 4:05; TASSEVA

Required for master’s and doctoral students

This course is an introduction to formal syntactic theory and is aimed at developing an understanding of the fundamental ideas, concepts and terminology currently used within the field of formal syntax. Though focusing mainly on the syntax of English the course will investigate universal principles of sentence structure ranging from the basic structure of clauses to derived syntactic constructions. In addition to introducing current analyses of sentence structure, the course will emphasize syntactic argumentation as well as linguistic generalizations.

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LING 739:  THE EVOLUTION OF LINGUISTIC THEORY, PRACTICE AND METHODS

TR 2:50 – 4:05; DUBINSKY

This course focuses on the development of linguistic theory through the 20th century.  The first half of the course surveys the history of the discipline through the middle of the 20th c., the second half of the course concentrates on the evolution of generative syntax over the past 50 years.

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LING 795:  PRINCIPLES & STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING ESOL

TR 4:25 – 5:40; LIU

Core requirement for the TESOL certificate, EFL and K-12 tracks

This course will survey the teaching of English to speakers of other languages, including the theoretical principles and practical strategies for approaches, methods, techniques, and materials, as they concern elementary, secondary, and post-secondary learners. WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:  language learning autobiography, second language acquisition theory-to-practice paper, analysis of and reflections on teaching observations, teaching report, teaching/tutoring/practical experiences journal, materials review/reflective analysis; ORAL PRESENTATION: approach/method/technique demonstration and presentation, written handouts to accompany presentation.  TUTORING/TEACHING/PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES:  experiences to be arranged, 20 contact hours required.  TEXTS: Brown, Teaching by Principles:  An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy, 3rd ed. (Pearson/Longman, 2007), required; Richards and Rodgers, Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching, 2nd ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2001), required; handouts; websites. This course satisfies one of the course requirements for the South Carolina Department of Education ESOL add-on certification.

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LING 805: AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH

MW 2:20 – 3:35; WELDON

Meets with LING 442/AFAM 442/ANTH 442/ENGL 457/LING 805

This course is designed to introduce students to the structure, history, and use of the distinctive varieties of English used by and among many African Americans in the U.S. In this course, we will examine some of the linguistic features that distinguish African-American English (AAE) from other varieties of American English. We will consider theories regarding the history and emergence of AAE. We will look at the representation of AAE in literature. We will examine the structure and function of various expressive speech events in the African-American speech community. And we will consider attitudinal issues regarding the use of AAE, especially as they relate to education and the acquisition of Standard English.

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LING 890: SEMINAR IN LANGUAGE ACQUISITION: L2 PHONOLOGY

MW 2:20 – 3:35; LIU

This course offers a broad introduction to the study of the acquisition of second language speech sounds and phonology. The content of the course includes three themes: 1. Theoretical issues and frameworks in L2 phonology; 2. Second language speech perception and production; 3. Training and curriculum design for L2 speech learning. In this way, it helps us understand L2 phonology from linguistic, cognitive and socio-cultural perspectives. Throughout this course some of the questions we will ask include: What are the major factors that shape final attainment of L2 phonology? Why do different L2 linguistic features impose different degree of difficulty for the learners? What is the role of universal grammar in the acquisition of L2 phonology? How can a formal linguistic framework model L2 phonology? What are the different theoretical models for speech perception and production? Can the acquisition of L2 phonology be accounted for by the general model of speech perception and production? How can social factor influence the acquisition of L2 phonology? How can we help improve learners’ non-native speech learning? What components should we consider in foreign language curriculum design if we try to improve L2 learners’ pronunciation?

 

COURSES OF INTEREST IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

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PSYC 822: SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

R 1:30 – 4:15 PM; ALMOR

This graduate seminar is intended as a broad yet rigorous introduction to some of the major current themes in psycholinguistics.  We will review main ideas and techniques in the study of spoken and written words, sentence processing, and discourse processing. At the end of this class students will be familiar with several significant milestones in the history of psycholinguistics as well as current models and themes. On the basis of this knowledge, students will be able to critically evaluate current scientific work in the field and utilize psycholinguistic themes and techniques in their own research.

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EDRD 796: TEACHING READING/WRITING

W 4:40 – 7:25; LOPEZ-ROBERTSON

This course surveys research on the mental processes and the linguistic contexts involved in reading and writing in a second language.  Pedagogical implications for elementary, secondary, and post-secondary learners are discussed.

The course will be taught at Jackson Creek Elementary School in Richland District Two.