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College of Arts & Sciences
Linguistics Program


Fall 2017 Linguistics Program Undergraduate Short Course Descriptions

Course times and instructors subject to change. Master Schedule has the most up-to-date information.

 

LING 101: LINGUISTICS I: INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE

TR 10:05 – 11:20; CHUN

SATISFIES GSS - SOCIAL SCIENCES CAROLINA CORE REQUIREMENT

What is language? How does language make us who we are?

This introductory course addresses issues of linguistic relevance to your daily life: What is language? Are human language and animal communication really that different? Is English a global language? Who speaks the best English? What does our speech say about who we are, where we come from, and where we are going? How do children learn language? Why is it so hard to learn a second language? How do we process language? What does language look like in our brains?

 

LING 240: LANGUAGE CONFLICT AND LANGUAGE RIGHTS

TR 11:40 – 12:55; DUBINSKY

SATISFIES VSR VALUES, ETHICS, AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CAROLINA CORE REQUIREMENT

Examine world history and political events through the lens of language!

Learn how international and local political and ethnic conflicts can be better understood through the lens of language, how language plays into the politics of power and social difference, and how linguistic minorities have struggled through conquest, colonization, immigration, enslavement, and class distinctions.

 

LING 300/ANTH 373/PSYC 470: INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE SCIENCES (three sections)

MW 2:20 – 3:35; STAFF

TR 6:00-7:15; STAFF

TR 1:15 – 2:30; (SCHC students only); MORRIS

What is language and how does it define us?

Language is both a system and creative entity. It lives in our brains but is shaped by society as a social convention. Come learn how the cognitive and social sides work together and help shape us as human beings.

 

LING 301/ENGL 389:  THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (two sections)          

MW 1:00 – 2:15; DISTERHEFT

MW 3:55 – 5:10; DISTERHEFT

How does English work? Why is there no “proper English”?

This course provides an introduction to the field of linguistics through an in-depth exploration of many facets of the English language. We will examine the English sound system (phonetics and phonology), word structure (morphology), grammar (syntax), and meaning and usage (semantics). We will also consider other aspects of English, including its acquisition by children, its history as a language, and its social functions as a local and global language.

 

LING 305/ENGL 439/ANTH 391:  TOPICS: LANGUAGE AND RACISM

TR 1:15-2:30; CHUN

That’s so racist! Or is it? Find out how racism is tied to language and what we can do about it.

This course explores the connections between language, race, and power by answering questions like the following: Are ethnic slurs always racist? Do we discriminate based on a person’s accent? What roles do the media and educators play in perpetuating or breaking down racial stereotypes? What is colorblindness? What is a microaggression? What is appropriation? What tools do we have to respond to racism? In short, we will investigate what racism is, how it relates to language, and what we can do to counter it.

 

LING 314/SPAN 317:  SPANISH PHONETICS & PRONUNCIATION

TR 11:40-12:55; HOLT

Not your parents’ Spanish class, and not like any you’ve had before!

Analyze and practice pronunciation based on the study of Spanish speech sounds and processes. Your pronunciation will improve dramatically, including such obvious markers of nonnative status as the pronunciation of vowels and trilled rr. To top it off, you will more easily recognize and identify different accents and dialects, and improve general listening comprehension. (taught in Spanish)

 

LING 340/ANTH 355: LANGUAGE, CULTURE & SOCIETY

MWF 1:10-2:00; REYNOLDS

How should you speak to your mother-in-law in Guugu Yimidhirr (an Australian language)?  When does silence speak louder than words?

Explore the relationship between language, culture, and communication as it has been theorized and analyzed within linguistic anthropology, one of the four main fields of American Anthropology. You will learn about what scholars have had to say on the subject, past and present, as well as gain hands-on-experience in what linguistic anthropologists actually do.

 

LING 405/ENGL 439/ANTH 391: TEACH ENGLISH ABROAD

MW 3:55-5:10; ROWE

Come prepare for the English Language Teaching adventure in your future!

You will work with English as a second language learners and veteran teachers here at USC.  You will have hands-on experiences while you develop your knowledge and skills for teaching and global travel. Please join us as we explore the excellent opportunities of English Language Teaching! There are no prerequisites for this course.

 

LING 421/ENGL 450:  ENGLISH GRAMMAR          

TR 10:05 – 11:20; LIU

Not your high-school grammar course!

Have you ever heard about descriptive grammar? This course will introduce you to grammar patterns emerging from a million-word written and spoken corpus. By the end of the course, you should be familiar with grammatical terms and be able to explain grammar rules, diagram English sentences, carry out editing, and perform linguistic analysis at discourse level.

 

LING 442/AFAM 442/ANTH 442/ENGL 457/LING 805: AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH

MW 2:20 – 3:35; WELDON

African American English: What it is… What it ain’t!

Learn about the history, structure, and use of African American English (AAE) from a linguistic perspective! Acquire the skills needed to debunk myths about the variety and gain an appreciation for its rule-governed system. Consider the contributions of AAE to music, literature, and various other aspects of (African) American culture and society. Reflect on the debate over the role of AAE in education and implications for the teaching of Mainstream Standard English.

 

LING 504/SPAN 515:  INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LINGUISTICS

TR 2:50 – 4: 05; MORENO

¿Qué es, para qué lo usamos y cómo funciona. ¿Qué significa “saber una lengua”?

El objetivo principal de este curso es una comprensión lo más amplia posible del lenguaje humano: ¿Qué significa “saber español”? ¿En qué difiere el español de las otras lenguas? ¿En qué se parece? ¿Debemos seguir hablando de una lengua, “el español”, o de varios “españoles”? Este curso presentará a los estudiantes las diferentes áreas en que está dividida la lingüística española y los problemas de los que se ocupa cada área. (taught in Spanish)

 

LING 565 / PHIL 517: PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE

TR 11:40 – 12:55; BEZUIDENHOUT

Could Humpty Dumpty be right when he tells Alice that, when he uses words, they mean just what he chooses them to mean?

You will find out in this course, where we will examine how words get meanings, what the relation is between words and things, the role of speaker intentions in accounting for meaning and reference, and the role that conversational context plays in the comprehension and production of utterances (both written and spoken). We will read and discuss recent arguments presented by philosophers and linguists addressing these and other related issues.

 

LING 570/PSYC 589: LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

TR 1:15 – 2:30; TASSEVA

Can we teach children native language? What does it mean to grow up bilingual? How do language disorders affect typical language development?

You will find out what it takes to acquire a native language, whether we agree parents and caregivers teach children their native language, what differences there are between typically developing children and children with language disorders. You will learn about empirically established patterns but also challenge some old and recent arguments about child language acquisition.