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College of Arts & Sciences
Department of Sociology


Fall 2017

SOCIOLOGY, USC, COLUMBIA

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Fall 2017

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.1: INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY            MWF               9:40AM – 10:30AM                         Aaron Vincent

 

   

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Selected theoretical orientations, methodological procedures, and illustrative substantive data pertaining to the relations between the individual and society

 

                                                                                                                                             

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.2:   INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY           MWF            10:50AM – 11:20AM           Zachery Butler                    

 

TEXT:  You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist, 4th Edition by Dalton Conley Also required is a digital product from the publisher of the text: “Inquizitive”

CONTENT:  In this course you will be introduced to the discipline of sociology.  By learning about sociological theories, terms, and methods, you can develop your own “Sociological Imagination.” A way of looking at our social world that allows us to go beyond our everyday understanding to reveal the complexity of social processes. 

REQUIREMENTS:  3 Exams (33%) Quizzes (50%) Inquizitive (17%)

FORMAT:   Lectures, class discussions, and online activities 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.3:  INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY            TR         11:40AM – 12:55PM             TBA

                                                                                   

 

                                                                                                                                             

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.4:  INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY             TR          10:05AM – 11:20AM               Adrianne Dues                        

 

This course will introduce you to the foundations of sociology!  We will examine many of the questions that sociologists ask and the theories that frame these questions.  We will address several questions such as why is there inequality? What role does race play in our society? How is our society changing? The course will specifically look at culture, social class and inequality, race ethnicity and gender, health, social deviance, social movements, and social institutions. Using media and film, the course will also include sociological examples occurring in present day society. Throughout the course of the semester I hope to enhance your ability to think critically, develop your ability to express your thoughts, and give your insight on sociological perspectives.

REQUIREMENTS: Exams, Quizzes, Participation

FORMAT: Lecture, Discussion, Media & Film 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.5:   INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY            MW        2:20PM – 3:35PM            Daniela Negraia      

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The goal of this course is to introduce students to the study of sociology.  During this course we will learn basic concepts and perspective used in sociological research.  We will examine the nature and characteristics of social behavior and inquire on the role played by groups, organizations, institutions and cultures.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a good representation of sociological theories and methods.

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                           

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.6:  INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY            MW         12:40PM – 1:55PM         Anna Rogers

                             

TEXT: You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist by Dalton Conley

CONTENT:This course will introduce students to sociological theory and major areas of research in the discipline of sociology. Through the use of lectures and various forms of media we will discuss sociological facts and principles through an analysis of group-making processes and products. This course will have three major components. The first section of the course will introduce students to sociological theory. The second section of the course will show how these theories are applied to topics such as gender, race, class, religion, deviance, law, and health. The third component of this course includes analysis of popular culture from American society that demonstrates how sociological theory can be applied to everything from every day interactions to larger worldwide networks. This course will show how we shape society and how society shapes us.

REQUIREMENTS: 3 tests, 10 quizzes, and assignments in Blackboard.                                                                                                                        5 Pop Quizzes: 20% of final grade (4% each)                                                                                                                                                                        3 Tests: 60% of final grade (20% each)                                                                                                                                                                         Assignments: 20% in total                                                                                                                                                                                      FORMAT: Video Lectures and Visual

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.7:   INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY        TR           1:15PM – 2:30PM              Professor Brent Simpson    

 

TEXT:There is no text book. Instead, all readings will be posted on Blackboard (http://blackboard.sc.edu).

CONTENT: This course is a selective survey of sociology. One of the many great things about sociology is its breadth. But that also makes it impossible to cover all the issues that deserve attention in a survey course. Thus, our coverage will be selective. We will focus primarily on questions related to how social order exists (and why it sometimes breaks down); how you seek to manage the impressions you give off to others and what happens when you fail; some sociological perspectives on crime & violence; some of the many ways that social networks and other social forces powerfully impact your life (for better or worse), including whether you’ll be happy and whether (and whom) you will marry. Finally, we will also look at the nature, causes and consequences of various forms of inequality (namely, those based on income, wealth, gender, and ethnicity).                                                                                                                   REQUIREMENTS: Grades are based on four exams, including a cumulative final exam. Each exam counts 25% toward your final grade. Students will have the opportunity to replace their lowest exam score with their “iClicker” score.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.8:  INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY         TR      2:50PM – 4:05PM          Professor Andrea Henderson-Platt        

 

CONTENT:: This course offers you an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes in the field of sociology.  It will focus on the function and organization of society, as well as how society impacts and influences individual understanding, action, and well-being.  Basic sociological ideas will be explored, such as culture, socialization, gender, race, and inequality.  In addition, we will examine how social institutions, such as religion, family, health, and education, influence everyday life chances.   The purpose of the course is to instill in you a “sociological imagination,” which can be used to decipher current social issues.  The knowledge gained in this course will aid you in future studies in a variety of fields and careers, and encourage the development of critical thinking about important social issues.

FORMAT:  Lecture, films, discussion, exams and quizzes.

 

                                                                                                    

SOCIOLOGY 101.H01:   INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY      TR        10:05AM – 11:20AM            Laura Brashears

Restricted to South Carolina Honors College Students

 

Each of us has an idea of what is meant by the word “society:” the people we live with, the work we do, and the government agencies that touch our lives. We live in particular places, work at specific businesses, and belong to our own groups. And while we must experience society from our own individual perspectives, none of those individual perspectives can encompass the totality of each of our experiences. Sociologists seek to examine the social world through an objective lens, rising above individual experiences to understand the whole. In other words, sociologists do not take the world before their eyes for granted; rather, we use scientific methods to gain a deeper understanding of how “society is inside of man and man is inside society.”

 No social endeavor is off-limits to sociologists; we study religion, education, the family, the self, crime, work, economics, politics, organizations, demographic shifts, gender, race and ethnicity and social movements, among other things. We even study how science itself operates as a social entity.

 

In this course, I will introduce you to a lot of facts that sociologists have collected within quite a few of these areas. While I think these facts are interesting, and important (or I wouldn’t bother teaching them!), I am much more concerned with teaching you how to step back and examine your world from an “outsider’s” perspective. In other words you will learn to use the “sociological imagination”, a faculty that allows us to see the way the world is, and to imagine how it might have been, or might become, different. Once you do so, you will be able to develop a deeper understanding of how social factors have influenced you in the past, and will continue to influence you in the future.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.H02:   INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY         TR          11:40AM – 12:55PM           TBA

Restricted to South Carolina Honors College Students

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.H03:  INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY             TR            1:15PM - 2:30PM      Professor Jason Cummings       

Restricted to South Carolina Honors College Students

 

CONTENT:  This course will introduce you to the sociological perspective! Broadly speaking, sociology is the study of society. According to the American Sociological Association, "Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior…"  We will examine many of the questions that sociologists ask, the theories that frame these questions and the methods that answer them.  We will address several questions such as why is there inequality? Why do some people commit crimes and others don’t? Why are there so many problems with the U.S. health care system? Throughout the course of the semester I hope to enhance your ability to think critically, develop your ability to express your thoughts and give your insight on how you shape society and how society shapes you. 

REQUIREMENTS:  Exams, Quizzes

FORMAT:  Lecture, Discussion, Media

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 101.S01: INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY          TR      1:15PM – 2:30PM          Professor Brent Simpson

 

TEXT: There is no text book. Instead, all readings will be posted on Blackboard

CONTENT: This course is a selective survey of sociology. One of the many great things about sociology is its breadth. But that also makes it impossible to cover all the issues that deserve attention in a survey course. Thus, our coverage will be selective. We will focus primarily on questions related to how social order exists (and why it sometimes breaks down); how you seek to manage the impressions you give off to others and what happens when you fail; some sociological perspectives on crime & violence; some of the many ways that social networks and other social forces powerfully impact your life (for better or worse), including whether you’ll be happy and whether (and whom) you will marry. Finally, we will also look at the nature, causes and consequences of various forms of inequality (namely, those based on income, wealth, gender, and ethnicity).

REQUIREMENTS: Grades are based on four exams, including a cumulative final exam. Each exam counts 25% toward your final grade. Students will have the opportunity to replace their lowest exam score with their “iClicker” score.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 220.1: ELEMENTARY STATISTICS FOR SOCIOLOGISTS     MWF       10:50AM – 11:20AM     Professor Jimy Sanders

 

CONTENT: The goal of this course is to help students improve their statistical literacy.  The course provides an introduction to descriptive, explanatory, and inferential statistical analyses.  Contemporary sociological examples are employed to demonstrate how various types of statistical analyses are helpful in conducting research.  Limitations of applying statistical techniques are also considered.  Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of when and why various statistical techniques are useful, and how to properly interpret different types of analyses. Students will make use of simple mathematical skills, but the mastery of complex mathematical operations is not a goal of this course.       

 

                                                                                                                                                  

REQUIREMENTS: There are three examinations during the semester and a cumulative final.  The examinations emphasize the interpretation of data and statistical analyses.  Minimal mathematical calculations are involved.  The examinations are not conducted with the use of a computer, but pocket calculators are needed.  Of the first three examinations, the lowest score will account for 10                                                                                                                                                             

percent of your course grade whereas the other two scores will each account for 30 percent of your course grade.  The final examination also accounts for 30 percent of your course grade.  Failure to take an examination results in a grade of zero for that examination.  Makeup examinations are provided only when the student has a legitimate excuse (e.g., sickness, death in the family, out of town on university activities).  Grades are assigned on a 10 point scale: 90s are As, 80s are Bs, etc.  B+ = 87-89, C+ = 77-79, D+ = 67-69.

FORMAT: Lecture, questions/answers.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 300.1      SOCIAL STRUCTURES                 MWF         10:50AM – 11:20AM                TBA  

 

 

       

SOCIOLOGY 302.1:    SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY            MW         2:20PM – 3:35PM           Professor Mathieu Deflem

TEXT: Collection of readings on Blackboard.
CONTENTS: Overview and discussion of major developments in sociological theory, including classical sociology and selections from modern and contemporary theory.
REQUIREMENTS: Three tests and a final exam.
FORMAT: Lecture.  

 

                                                                                                                                                                            

SOCIOLOGY 303.1:    SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS    TR    2:50PM – 4:05PM      Professor Jennifer Augustine                                     

Course Description:   You are always observing the world around you. If you’re paying attention, you have questions about why things are the way they are. Why do the rich live longer than the poor?  Why do children of single mothers have lower test scores than children who grow up with two parents? Why are women in the United States paid less than men? These are important questions, but how do we answer them? The aim of this course is to teach you how to investigate such sociological questions by providing you a range of tools for studying the world around you. These tools will encompass the various research methods and skills used by sociologists. Such knowledge and skills will allow you to identify important research questions, design a study that you will carry out, and critically evaluate the research of others.

                                                                                                                                 

 

SOCIOLOGY 305.1:  SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY            TR             1:15PM – 2:30PM                       TBA

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 315.1:  GLOBAL POPULATION ISSUES         TR                  10:05AM – 11:20AM           Professor Douglas Anderton

 

TEXTS & ONLINE MATERIALS: Selected journal articles and reports are provided on-line.  No text is required.

CONTENT:  This course provides an overview of selected population theories, the history of world population, and the interaction of population growth with social organization, the environment and technology, all in a policy oriented framework.  Topics are covered from global, regional and local perspectives, including important demographic trends (e.g. reproductive control, health, aging, mortality, and immigration) and the impacts of population behavior on economic development, inequality, resource scarcity and climate change.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:  Upon completing this course students should have a critical understanding of the following: (1) general theories regarding population growth and the impacts of growth, (2) global population history and the lessons of history for population policies, (3) contemporary population issues spanning (a) health and the life course, (b) economic development and inequality, and (c) environmentally scarce resources and climate related conditions, (4) current policy debates and proposed policies, from a global perspective and from the perspective of both more-developed and less-developed regions of the planet.       

FORMAT:  This is a blend of a traditional lecture course and a “flip” (or Team Based Methods) course.  Although we will begin with lectures and discussion, informational materials will be increasingly delivered outside of course meeting times to allow seminar activities during course time.  Seminars will largely be in the format of Policy Workshops/Presentations led by assigned teams. 

REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:

1) E-Journal: Half of your grade will be based upon an e-format (e.g. Word Processor, Blog, etc.) analytical journal in which you will track policy issued discussed for two assigned countries (one more developed and one less developed) throughout the course. Questions from assigned readings will also be answered within the journal.

2) Policy Presentations: 40 % of your grade will be based on group policy workshops and presentations.

3) Participation: 10% of your grade will be based upon participation in the course.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 320.1:  INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY          TR           2:50PM – 4:05PM                          Professor Shane Thye

 

TEXTS:   Social Psychology.  David G. Meyers (1999), McGraw Hill.

CONTENT:    This course is a broad introduction to social psychology.  Particular emphasis is placed on the way groups have an effect on human thought and behavior.  We examine topics such as perception, status structures, decision making, cults, persuasion, aggression, love, conflict, resolution, and many more.

REQUIREMENTS:   There are three in-class exams, each of the same relative weight.  While there will be no cumulative final exam you will find that the concepts in this course will necessarily cumulate.  Pop quizzes are given in class and a number of short papers are assigned.

FORMAT:   Lecture and discussion.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 323.1:  SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR                                TBA                                     Joseph Padgett

 

CONTENT: This course considers why and how certain attributes and behaviors are defined as deviant, the consequences of deviant labels, and how norms, values, and rules are made and enforced. We will cover basic concepts that run across deviance theories and research, including social control, subcultures, and deviant careers. The course will present various theories of deviant behavior and societal reaction.  We will discuss methodology and how deviance, its causes, and its outcomes are researched, understood, and explained by sociologists and other social scientists. The course will touch on substantive topics in the research of deviance such as

crime, organizational and occupational deviance, substance use, sexuality, suicide, disability, and mental illness.

REQUIREMENTS: Exams, short essays, class discussion

FORMAT: Lecture, discussion, multimedia

 

 

 SOCIOLOGY 326.1:  SOCIOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE     MW       9:15AM – 10:30AM           Professor Caroline Hartnett                         

 

The Life Course Perspective argues that we make active choices to construct our biographies, that things affect us differently depending on when in the life course they happen, that we are shaped by our historical context, that the various domains of our lives (work, family, etc.) are intertwined, and that our biographies are linked to others'. We will use this framework to better understand how social inequalities (particularly related to health, family and fertility patterns, education, and work) emerge and evolve during childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. This is a reading intensive course in which students are expected to participate in class discussions.
                                                                                                                                 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 330.1:   SOCIOLOGY OF THE PARANORMAL       TR         11:40AM – 12:55PM           Professor Barry Markovsky

                            

CONTENT:  This course will permanently change the way you think about paranormal phenomena. We take a two-pronged approach to understanding widespread beliefs in ESP, UFOs, astrology, faith healing, ghosts and many others. First, we consider the social and psychological processes that lead people to believe paranormal claims, even in the absence of good evidence. Second, we take a skeptical stance in analyzing the claims themselves. We first review the topics of critical thinking, scientific theorizing and scientific

methods for evaluating evidence. Following this, we cover a variety of cases through readings, lectures, and videos. Each new case

                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                          

triggers an analysis, drawing upon knowledge from a variety of different scientific fields. Special attention is paid to social science explanations, including theories of perception, persuasion, attitude and attribution formation, interpersonal social influence processes, small group “micro-cultural” factors, and large-scale cultural and communication processes.

 

SOCIOLOGY 370.1:   SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT            MW               2:20PM – 3:35PM                         Derek Silva

CONTENT: This lecture-based course is designed to introduce the student to the most important theoretical and empirical developments in the sociology of sport. First and foremost, this is a course in the sociology of sport. As such, we will put aside questions of individual performance and training in favor of the sociological study of sport in society. This course will be divided into three sections: (a) theoretical foundations in the sociology of sport; (b) thematic discussions of the role of sport within society; and (3) critical analysis of empirical research and current developments in the sociology of sport. The first section will survey some of the most important theoretical developments in sociology as it relates to sport in society.                                                                                                                                                                           

We will begin with some classical work  (Marx, Weber, Durkheim) prior to shifting towards the contemporary (Foucault, Bourdieu). We will then examine institutionalized sport from a sociological perspective. Here we will discuss the role of gender, sexuality, race, and social class in sport and how these influence society and social structures. Finally, We will move to a critical analysis of empirical research and current developments in the sociology of sport. In this final part, we will examine case studies and current issues in sport and apply some of the knowledge we have gained throughout the course.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to know and understand the manner in which sociologists study sport. They should also be able to discuss the role of race, gender, sexuality, and social class in sport and how this intersects with society. Finally, students should be able to empirically analyze contemporary issues in sport and how these influence society and various social institutions. These outcomes will be measured with three quizzes and a final examination, in addition to a final essay.

REQUIREMENTS: The assignments count for a total of 100 points, distributed as follows:

Quiz 1:                                              15 points

Quiz 2:                                              15 points

Quiz 3:                                              15 points

Paper:                                               15 points

Final Exam (cumulative):  40 points

FORMAT: This course will be organized around lectures, film, class discussion, and small group projects. There will be three quizzes – one for each section – followed by a cumulative final examination. There will also be a term paper. This paper will demonstrate the students’ ability to utilize course material to critically examine an issue or event in sport and discuss its relation to society and social institutions.                                                                                              

 

SOCIOLOGY 398.1: TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY             TR          1:15PM – 2:30PM               Professor Matthew Brashears

 

CONTENT:  "What do terrorist groups, criminal syndicates and online groups like Anonymous have in common? First, they hope to accomplish one or more goals and, second, they must do so while remaining largely undetected. In other words, they belong to a new and intriguing class of entities known as “covert social networks”. In this course we will consider the unique difficulties encountered by covert social networks, as well as their peculiar strengths. We will begin with a discussion of what is meant by a social network, introduce the problems and opportunities faced by such structures when they attempt to remain covert, and finally discuss possible methods for finding them. By the end of the course, students should have a better understanding of the dark side of social networks."       

 

SOCIOLOGY 505.1:  SOCIAL STRUCTURE - COMMUNITIES       TR         2:50PM – 4:05PM      Professor Matthew Brashears

 

CONTENT: This course analyzes how communities are composed of smaller sub-units as well as how communities interact with larger societal social structures. We will begin by considering the importance of structure and culture in determining the outcome of individual lives. We will then look at the interactions of these broad forces in education, association, sexuality, economics, and a variety of other domains. By the end of the course students should have a basic grasp of how a variety of different areas of our society function as parts of larger systems.                                         

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 512.1:  INTERNAL AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION           MWF      1:10PM – 2:00PM        Professor Jimy Sanders

 

The goal of this course is to introduce students to sociological research and theory on the topic of human migration. Emphasis is placed

on learning about the range of conditions that encourage and discourage human migration, the modern history of human migration (we touch only briefly on ancient human migration), and how human migration impacts both points-of-origin and points-of-destination. Particular attention is paid to how economic development and inequality are related to human migration and how migration has grown in political salience. Because the course is sociological in its approach, we place emphasis on examining social causes of human behavior. The behavior (migration) may be that of individuals or of groups. We also take into account both historical and contemporary social contexts within which migration manifests (e.g., the Syrian civil war).

 

             

SOCIOLOGY 510.1:  LIFE COURSE DEMOGRAPHICS           MW      12:40PM – 1:55PM        Professor Caroline Hartnett

 

This is primarily a course on how to conduct demographic data analysis. Students will become familiar with various types of demographic data, learn techniques for analyzing and presenting data, and have opportunities to practice applying these skills using Excel and Stata. In addition, we will read about and discuss topics such as: childhood health, school readiness, early childbearing, transitions from education to work, migration, marriage and divorce, retirement, and poor health in old age. It is recommended (but not required) that students take SOCY 310 or 315 before enrolling.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 598.1:   SELECTED TOPICS         TR          1:15PM – 2:30PM               Professor Andrea Henderson-Platt

 

This course offers an introduction to a conceptual and topical overview of the Sociology of Medicine and Health (aka Medical Sociology or Sociology of Health and Illness).   This sub-discipline of sociology starts from the assumption that we cannot understand the topics of health and illness simply by looking at biological and medical knowledge, but, instead, we must also consider a variety of social, political, economic, and cultural forces.   Specific topics to be addressed in this course include:  (a) the social and cultural meanings and experiences of health and illness; (d) the social determinates of health and health disparities, including the connections between race, class, gender and health; (c) the organization of health care delivery systems and associated patient outcomes; and (d) providers and patients—the impact of culture, roles, and relationships. In sum, this course will explore each of these issues and help improve your understanding of the many ways that society and culture affects health and illness.

 

 

SOCIOLOGY 710.1:  THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY      M      4:40PM – 7:25PM        Professor Mathieu Deflem

TEXT: Collection of primary texts and readings available online. 
CONTENTS: This graduate-level seminar reviews selected developments in the theoretical foundations of sociology, especially from the period that coincided with the institutionalization of sociology as a social science. 

REQUIREMENTS: Active class participation; mid-term paper; class presentation; and a final paper. 
FORMAT: Seminar.

 

                                                                                                                                                                            

SOCIOLOGY 769.1:   TOPICS IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY         R            5:00PM – 7:45PM         Professor Shane Thye

 

OVERVIEW: This course focuses on the purposes, design and implementation of laboratory experiments in sociology.  Special attention is paid to the role of sociological theory in the design of experiments.  In addition I will (1) provide step-by-step methods covering all aspects of developing and running experiments, including how to avoid common flaws and pitfalls;
(2) teach hands-on basic and intermediate-level statistical methods for analyzing data.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course students will be able to: (i) determine which procedure in ANOVA is appropriate for each experimental design, (ii) discuss the difference between Type I and Type II statistical error and understand the consequences of each, (iii) understand the effects of disproportionality in experimental data, (iv) calculate the F statistic, Tukey’s T, Scheffe’s T, Bonferroni T, Newman Kewls, Dunnetts test, and understand when each is appropriate, (v) understand the different sums of squares extraction techniques and determine when each is appropriate, (vi) be able to calculate statistical power both after the fact and before the study is conducted, (vii) read and interpret Feldt power charts, and (viii) recognize various experimental designs and understand which statistical techniques are and are not appropriate.

 

SOCIOLOGY 775.1:  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY            TR       1:15PM – 2:30PM          Professor Andrea Henderson-Platt

 

This course offers an introduction to a conceptual and topical overview of the Sociology of Medicine and Health (aka Medical Sociology or Sociology of Health and Illness).   This sub-discipline of sociology starts from the assumption that we cannot understand the topics of health and illness simply by looking at biological and medical knowledge, but, instead, we must also consider a variety of social, political, economic, and cultural forces.   Specific topics to be addressed in this course include:  (a) the social and cultural meanings and experiences of health and illness; (d) the social determinates of health and health disparities, including the connections between race, class, gender and health; (c) the organization of health care delivery systems and associated patient outcomes; and (d) providers and patients—the impact of culture, roles, and relationships. In sum, this course will explore each of these issues and help improve your understanding of the many ways that society and culture affects health and illness.

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